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An extremely fine and important sapphire tonneau-form skeletonized

cal. RM56-02 manual winding tourbillon movement, 19 jewels, sapphire centre bridges and titanium movement baseplate suspended from single-braided cable through 8 pulleys  skeletonized dial, outer minute track sapphire tonneau-form case, sapphire crystal bezel and display back secured by 12 screws  case, dial and movement signed  with a transparent strap by Aerospace Nano® and titanium Richard Mille folding clasp Accompanied by Richard Mille warranty and a traveling pouch. Created for the Hong Kong Watches & Wonder event in 2015, the magnificent RM56-02 Sapphire Tourbillon is the watchmaking milestone for it's complex case design for the weightlessness and transparency. This timepiece is centred on two innovations, the first being the cable and pulley system that suspends the movement from the sapphire case taken from their RM 27-01 Nadal watch; and second, the unparalleled use of sapphire to create transparent components. Being cut and milled from solid blocks of sapphire, RM56-02's entire case, including the front bezel, caseband and back bezel. Knowing as a particularly scratch-resistant material, sapphire creates the transparency to the timepiece based on its molecular composition. The three-part case is made entirely of sapphire crystal making it scratch resistant. This wristwatch is a true testament to Richard Milles commitment to perfection as the case has to be milled and ground from solid pieces of sapphire and takes up to 40 days to create one RM 56-02 case and an additional 400 hours for the sapphire bridge. Furthermore, the grade 5 titanium baseplate is suspended by a system of four pulleys on the case as well as six pulleys on the baseplate itself, which is all held together with a 0.35mm braided cable. With only 10 pieces produced, technique and creativity is what makes this watch a novel piece in the Richard Mille collection and beyond. This elegant and complex wristwatch features unique components that reinforce the brands craftsmanship and innovation. It is a rare collectors watch that is seldom presented.

  • HKGHongkong (S.A.R. Kina)
  • 2017-10-01
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An attractive

Omega Case, dial, movement and buckle signed, dial further signed Tiffany & Co. So often in the careers of great men and women of history, there came a point in time where they were told their talents were not sufficient to realize their dreams. In the case of Elvis Presley, these words came early and often – in the halls of his high school, early auditions, in the failure of his earliest acetate albums – as he was told very clearly that not only could he not sing, but also the music that captured his interest had no real value. The end of 1953 saw a dramatic change in attitudes towards Presley’s viability as a singer and performer, and by the end of the decade he was a musical phenomenon who electrified millions of attendees at his live performances and sold an unprecedented number of records under the stewardship of RCA Records, the record company he signed with in late 1955. From the mid-1950s until his untimely death in 1977 Elvis had an active role in creating the modern American musical landscape and the development of a unique youth culture. Elvis’ importance to the inception of rock and roll, and contemporary music as a whole, cannot be understated. His image has transcended the categories of the music he played and the movies he starred in to become a cornerstone of modern pop culture. Depicted in every material form imaginable, his estate at Graceland remains a pilgrimage site for fans of his music. In 2010, the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C. held an exhibit entitled “One Life: Echoes of Elvis, ” giving scope to the impact of Elvis on American history and culture. The recording studio in Nashville, Tennessee opened by RCA Records in 1957 remains open today, located in the historic Music Row. Elvis recorded many of his overwhelming number of hit records throughout the late 1950s and 1960s at the very same location. In February of 1961, at a charity luncheon and subsequent concert arranged by the record company with the governor of Tennessee and the mayor of Memphis present, RCA Records presented Presley with a plaque commemorating the 75 million records he had sold worldwide. Accompanying this plaque, which remains at Graceland to this day, RCA Records also gifted this Tiffany-signed Omega wristwatch to Presley. The 25th of February 1961 was proclaimed ‘Elvis Presley Day’ and the singer was made an Honorary Colonel of the city of Memphis. The concert itself was an immense success, raising $51,612 for various Memphis charities and the Elvis Presley Youth Center in his hometown of Tupelo, Mississippi. With regards to the watch itself, the case back inscription reads: “To Elvis 75 Million Records RCA Victor12-25-60”Elvis is the second all-time best-selling musician, and the best-selling individual artist behind The Beatles, having sold in excess of 500 million albums. 1960 was a particularly eventful year for Elvis’ popularity, and Christmas of that year marks a peak in visibility and success. Having steadily released content recorded in anticipation of Elvis’ hiatus between 1958 and 1960 when he was drafted into the U.S. Army, RCA Records was eager for Elvis to return to the studio. In March and April of 1960, Elvis recorded Elvis is Back!, released on April 8th, 1960, and then in October of 1960, Elvis recorded His Hand In Mine, released on November 10th. On December 25th, 1960, Elvis had two well-attended movies in theaters, Flaming Star and G.I. Blues, as well as both the number one single in the United States, “Are You Lonesome Tonight” and the United Kingdom, “It’s Now Or Never.” Research suggests that December 25th marks the actual date Elvis reached 75 million records, and RCA arranged the laudatory charity luncheon and concert not only to award Elvis for such a significant achievement, but also to reestablish Elvis as a performer. Elvis was likely the first artist, individual or otherwise, to ever reach 75 million records sold.The incredible provenance of this historic timepiece is furthermore confirmed by photos of Presley wearing the watch at the charitable concert that followed the luncheon, as well as certificates of authenticity from the Elvis Presley Museum. According to a statement made by the owner of the present lot, and part and parcel with Elvis’ modus operandi with his personal watches, the watch was given to the current owner’s uncle after he had expressed his admiration. Spotting the diamond studded Hamilton the admirer was wearing, Elvis proposed a trade, and they quickly swapped the pieces. Elvis was known to have owned quite an array of watches, and a selection of those were presented to him on particularly significant occasions. More than that, however, Elvis was known to give away his watches if someone expressed desire or admiration, such as with the gold Omega Constellation he bequeathed to a fellow musician and former US Army veteran, which sold at auction in 2016. Other watches owned or purportedly owned by Elvis Presley have come to auction in the years since the King’s death, either along with other Presley memorabilia or from the estates of subsequent owners. None, however, mark as great a moment in his career. Scholars largely agree the years up to 1958 and Elvis’ induction into the US Army as the peak of Elvis’ career, where his eminence as a musician, actor and pop culture icon converged to reach mass popularity and influence. Reaching 75 million records in 1960, after two years in the US Army, robbed of the chance to record and perform, was an incredible feat. Musically, the charity concert itself marks the re-entry of Elvis into the realm of live performance, a place where he was largely seen as masterful and in command, where he truly belonged as an artist and performer. The watch is cased in 18k white gold, housing a manually-wound Omega calibre 510 stamped with the ‘OXG’ import code for the United States, which aligns with the ‘Tiffany & Co.’ signature under the Omega signature and applied logo. The bezel is set with forty-four brilliant cut diamonds, accenting slim, elongated hour markers and an elegant silvered ivory dial. Omega confirms the movement for this piece was supplied to their American agent at the time, the Norman Morris Corporation, and manufactured in 1958. The case was made by American case manufacturer Jonell Watch Case Company, Inc., located in Long Island City, New York, which supplied cases for Omega’s American distributors until at least 1965. We are humbled and thrilled to present the current lot that once belonged to the man who simply said, in response to questions regarding his popularity, “All I do is sing and dance a little.”

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2018-05-13
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Geneva, attributable to Frères Rochat, made for the Chinese market, circa 1820. Extremely rare and magnificent pair of gold and enamel pearl- and diam

Geneva, attributable to Frères Rochat, made for the Chinese market, circa 1820. Extremely rare and magnificent pair of gold and enamel pearl- and diamond-set singing bird pistols. C. Made entirely of gold and enamel in the form of a double-barreled flintlock pistol, conjoined hexagonal barrels in translucent dark blue enamel over flinqué with gold scrollwork simulating damascene work, the opening set with diamonds and terminating with hinged panel enameled on the outside with black enamel and inside painted with a bird among flowers, the gold pan sides with rectangular gold plaques with concave corners, one depicting a sleeping lion, the other an antelope with black enamel border in diamond-set frame, the bottom of the pan decorated with a pattern of alternating straps of gold and black enamel, the grips with translucent scarlet enamel over engine-turning with pearl-set rosette in the middle with rose-cut diamond in the center, lower edge set with half pearls, upper edge decorated with wreath of laurel leaves made of graduated half pearls and black enamel, the back of the grip decorated with gold and black enamel fine crossing pattern with scrolling set with graduated half pearls. The top edge set with half pearls, gold matted and engraved hammers, the head of the flint vise engraved with lion’s heads, gold vise nuts terminated with diamonds, agate flints, gold pan covers mirror polished inside and engraved with acanthus leaves on the outside with their springs terminating with diamonds, opening under the right pan cover for sound, three barrel-like ramrod pipes, the ramrod containing the key for the watch. -{266}- 835 Frères Rochat Property of a West Coast Gentleman M. Rectangular, two tier, each slightly different, 115 x 29 mm, brass, reversed fusee and chain, six cams set on the extension of the second wheel arbor controlling the sound (whistle), the bird’s movements (turning, flapping wings, opening the beak and moving tail) controlled by two cams set on the same arbor between the plates, unusual mechanism for lifting and retrieving the bird, where both functions have their own mechanisms, each with its own spring, circular bellows. Punched with unidentified mark on chain ring of one of the pistols. Dim. Length 145 mm., width 38 mm. To be sold without reserve

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-05-14
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An 18k yellow gold chronograph with daniels independent double-wheel

• gilt brass movement with Lepine calibre construction, 32-hour duration, two going barrels with contra-rotating trains driving the two escape wheels of the Daniels independent double-wheel, incorporating a 'Y' shaped central locking detent with three pallets, mono-metallic stainless steel four-arm balance with gold adjusting screws and Daniels auxiliary compensation, free-sprung overcoil balance spring, the two trains calculated for mean-solar and sidereal time including seconds, annual calendar ring with kidney-cam and equation of time indication, accurate lunar dial driven from the sidereal train and indication of the age and phase of the moon, centre-seconds chronograph mechanism engaging either train, selected by a lever on the movement • silver engine-turned dial with 24-hour chapter ring to the left for sidereal time, 12-hour chapter ring to the right for mean-solar time, each with overlapping subsidiary seconds dials below, roman and arabic numerals, outer seconds track for chronograph, aperture in the mean-solar chapter ring for the annual calendar, apertures in the sidereal dial for the age and phase of the moon, fan-form sector above for equation of time, signed Daniels in a cartouche below the seconds rings, gold Daniels hands to the mean-solar dials and blued-steel Daniels hands to the sidereal dials and chronograph • case with engine-turned bezels, glazed back with two round buttons in the band for chronograph, Daniels pendant and bow • dial and movement signed • attached yellow gold double-link chain and gold and blued steel double ended key Accompanied by a George Daniels presentation case. In 1974 Dr. Daniels invented the independent double-wheel escapement; the movement was to captivate collectors with its visual appeal of symmetrical trains. Dr. Daniels was on a trip to Zurich where he met an important collector for dinner.  The collector nudged him and said ‘what do you have in your pocket’, so he took out his watch, a gold Daniels pocket watch with independent double-wheel escapement. The collector said he had to have the watch and asked him to sell it to him. Dr. Daniels said it was not for sale but the collector persisted. Dr. Daniels thought this was an enormous compliment as he did not even ask the price, and so sold him the watch. Dr. Daniels immediately regretted selling this watch and therefore decided to make another which would be an improvement on the first both in terms of complication and accuracy. Having not fully exploited the first watch, the second watch would have separate calculations for each train, it was therefore possible to indicate both mean-solar and sidereal time. In the 18thcentury to check the accuracy of your watch you had to have a precision clock which was set by a star. This watch by means of having solar and sidereal time could make the calculation for you, the difference being 3.555 minutes per day. To try and improve the calculation of the train which allowed for an error of 0.8 seconds per year Dr. Daniels contacted a friend at Cambridge University to ask if they knew of a mathematician interested in watches. He got a response almost immediately and extraordinarily enough the mathematicians name was Professor Daniels.  The professor was able to calculate a better ratio of 0.28 seconds per day, which Dr. Daniels was very happy with. Dr. Daniels used to say to people, ‘when you are on your package tour to Mars you need a watch like this, and when using the telephone for long distance calls you could switch the chronograph into sidereal time to cut your bills by 3.555 minutes per day’. Originally the watch had been referred to as the Daniels squared (2) because of the assistance he received from Professor Henry Daniels but Dr. Daniels did not think this was good enough so named it the ‘Space Travellers’ watch in honour of the American landing on the moon which was the greatest space exploratory journey of the century. Sotheby's sold the first Space Travellers' watch on 17th November 1988 in Geneva for 220,000 CHF.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2012-11-06
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La leçon de chant Frères Rochat, Geneva, No. 120, made for the Chinese market, circa 1815

La leçon de chant Frères Rochat, Geneva, No. 120, made for the Chinese market, circa 1815. Exceptional and unique large rectangular 18K gold and enamel pearl- and diamond-set large singing bird box featuring two birds with rare forward movement of the head and body. C. Four-body, the center of the front lid with aperture for large very finely painted on enamel medallion with flowers and fruits, which when lifted reveals two birds rising over a realistically painted enamel nest with straw and flowers and champlevé enamel border. Between them is a vase with diamond-set flowers, at which the birds appear to peck. The birds rotate, turn their heads, move their heads back and forth, lean forward, flap their wings and and tails and open their beaks to sing, one after the other. The top panel decorated with gold scrolling and champlevé foliate and floral patterns against pink champlevé enamel, outer edges and aperture set with half pearls, one side hinged revealing the key compartment. Side panels and the base decorated with translucent green enamel over double pattern engine-turning with frames of white and pink champlevé enamel and blue enamel flowers. M. Rectangular, 100 x 65 mm. brass, large going barrel, twelve cams and a whistle with sliding piston for the song’s modulation. The cams rotate four times per song and lift one step every rotation, allowing a long duration of singing. Addfitional set of four cams mounted on the extension of the third wheel for controlling the bird movement. Cam and fusee-like chain controlling the raising of the medallion and the birds. Punched with the maker’s mark FR and serial number on the inside of the front plate. Diam. 105 x 72 x 40 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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A small silver-mounted ebony roman striking table clock, London, dated 1677

6-inch latched velvet-covered dial with silver winged cherub spandrels and chapter ring, the centre with circular foliate pierced and engraved plaque signed Joseph Knibb Londini Fecit, two train fusee movement with five latched baluster pillars, tic-tac escapement and striking  the roman notation on two bells, the backplate signed Joseph Knibb Londini Inventit and Fecit Anno Domini 1677, further decorated with engraved sprays within a wheatear border, numbered count wheel, the domed case with carrying handle and pierced frets, the corners with ball finials, the front door with winged cherub escutcheons Joseph Knibb, the most famous and inventive member of the celebrated Knibb clockmaking family was born circa 1640. He was apprenticed to his cousin Samuel in about 1655 and after serving seven years worked first at Oxford and then moved to London in 1670 where he was made Free of the Clockmakers' Company. He must soon have built up a good reputation for himself as it is recorded that he supplied a turret clock for Windsor Castle in 1677 and payments were made to him in 1682 on behalf of King Charles II. No other maker produced such an intriguing variety of striking and repeating mechanisms and perhaps the most interesting of these is the Roman system employed in this clock. It is an ingenious method of accurately sounding the hours by a smaller number of blows than the conventional system. Two bells are used, the smaller of which indicates the Roman I as displayed on the dial and the larger bell the Roman V. The Roman X is indicated by two blows on the larger bell. The greatest number of blows struck at any hour is four at 8 and 12 o'clock. The advantage of the Roman system is that the clock has to make only twenty-six blows in twelve hours compared with seventy-eight blows on a conventional clock. The numeral for 4 o'clock, on a Roman striking clock, is shown as IV, requiring only two blows, rather than the more usual IIII. Knibb may have had some difficulty persuading his clients to accept this form of striking as examples are rare and the notation is, at first, confusing. Clocks by Knibb with velvet dials and silver mounts are extremely rare and this example has almost every desirable feature being particularly small, having Roman striking, tic tac escapement and a most interesting inscription which could refer to either or both the striking and escapement. Towards the end of the 17th century Joseph Knibb moved to Hanslop in Buckinghamshire. A few clocks with the Hanslop address are known but by the early years of the 18th Century Knibb had virtually retired; he died in December 1711.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2012-11-06
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Precision Timekeeper with 3 ComplicationsAntide Janvier, "pour son Ami Gorcy, composé à Paris, terminé en 1810".Unique and spectacular, astronomical,

Precision Timekeeper with 3 ComplicationsAntide Janvier, "pour son Ami Gorcy, composé à Paris, terminé en 1810".Unique and spectacular, astronomical, 3 week-going, double overhanging pendulum, "resonance" mantle regulator with two independent trains, each with one-second remontoir and Berthoud type detent escapement. C. Rectangular mahogany base with rounded front corners, applied ormolu decoration in the front depicting two fish spouting water, supporting a protective glass dome. D. White enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, three hands: fleur de lis for the hours and blued steel index for the minutes driven by train No. 1 (left) and "poker" minute hand driven by train No. 2, winding apertures at 4 and 8 o'clock. The dial is flanked by two silvered humpback panels with seconds chapters at the top, theleft one driven by train No. 1 and the right one, running counterclockwise, by train No.2. M. Rectangular, 19,5 cm wide, 12,8 cm high, brass, mounted to heavy brass frame, two trains, each one with its own ingeniously simple constant force Berthoud detent escapement, two brass-steel gridiron compensating pendulums beating half seconds, knife-edge suspensions. Each escapement consist of pivoted rocking frame holding wheel, say, "A" and pivoted in such a way that it meshes with the pinion "B" (10eaves) of the fifth train wheel "C" (10 teeth) resembling an escape wheel. The rocking bar by the force of gravity falls down on the side where the wheel "A" is pivoted. The other side of the wheel meshes with 10-tooth escape wheel so, when the escape wheel is locked, the force of mainspring transmitted by the pinion "B" lifts the wheel A and consequently raises the bar, furnishing constant energy to the escapement. The end of the rocking bar is terminated with a detent that locks the wheel "C"ust after the lifting. The pendulum unlocks the escape wheel which is driven by the falling action of the rocking bar and so delivers an impulse to the pendulum with constant momentum. The pendulum is terminated by a platform holding the impulse pallet and unlocking spring, both with regulating screws. Two spring-loaded steel brackets securing pendulums for transport, four leveling knobs at each corner of the base, with a level at the back of the base, two length-adjustment knobs at the top of te frame.Signed on the movement, the dial, and both pendulums, the subsidiary seconds dials signed "A" and "J".Dim. Height 63 cm, base width 35 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2001-11-11
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An exceedingly rare

Rolex Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed The most unattainable and sought-after variant of all Paul Newman wristwatches is unequivocally the “Oyster Sotto Paul Newman”. Scholars estimate that less than 20 examples have appeared and no more than a handful have been sold at auction thus far.The moniker “Oyster Sotto”, meaning “Oyster Underneath” in Italian, signifies the correct dial configuration of a reference 6263 “Paul Newman” fitted with a black dial. A correct one displays “Rolex Cosmograph Oyster” rather than “Rolex Oyster Cosmograph”, the latter of which is the correct configuration of a “Paul Newman” with white dial. “Oyster Sotto” dials were fitted to the earliest 6263s, the “Oyster” designation referring to the model’s water-resistant screw-down pushers.Prominently displayed in literature, this watch is one of the most impressive “Oyster Sotto” wristwatches to ever appear in the public eye. The watch is positively unpolished, exhibiting crisp lug-holes and razor-sharp edges. It even displays original bevels on the bottom edge of the lugs, which would have disappeared with the slightest polishing.Among the very first “Oyster Sotto” Cosmographs ever produced, the present watch is classified as Mk 1. It features a “small R” in Rolex and ever so slightly slanted ‘H’ in “Cosmograph”. Furthermore, the “Oyster” designation does not have serifs. These dials were originally fitted to non-waterproof references 6262 or 6264, which bore “Rolex Cosmograph”. The “Oyster” inscription was thus added to the dial after by Rolex,to denote reference 6263’s waterproof ability.Most importantly, the earliest “Oyster Sotto” models are all found within a close serial range of each other, bearing a 2’085’xxx serial number. To date, the market has identified a handful of correct Mk 1 examples, all within 10 digits of each other. Moreover, they are fitted with a 6239 case back stamped C.R.S for the maker C.R. Spillmann S.A. Other correct features of this watch are the first generation ‘millerighe’ pushers, the 5-point Rolex crown that displays only the coronet and the Mk 1 bezel.As an even nicer touch, it’s offered with its Rolex ‘Garanzia’ dated November 22, 1972 stating the watch was sold in Pelloni, Rome. Situated on Via del Corso 140, retailer and jeweler Pelloni was eventually purchased by Hausmann & Co, still in business today.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2018-05-12
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"Sympathique" Watch No. 1, accompanied by the Master Clock. A)Unique gold gentleman's astronomical wristwatch, with 1 minute tourbillon, regulator dia

"Sympathique" Watch No. 1, accompanied by the Master Clock. A)Unique gold gentleman's astronomical wristwatch, with 1 minute tourbillon, regulator dial, phase and age of the moon, and winding indicator, automatically wound and set to exact time by the accompanying Clock. Delivered with both gold and leather bracelets with double deployant buckles and a pair-case in gold enabling the wristwatch to be transformed into pocket watch. B)Unique gold astronomical clock with phase and age of the moon, equation of time, centigrade thermometer, year calendar with month and date, and days of the week. Constructed on the principals of the "garde-temps", with "remontoire", visible chronometer escapement and winding indicator. A) Case: Wristwatch; 18 ct., circular, massive and polished with reeded band, the classic Breguet s with an ingenious quick-release system for removing and re-mounting the bracelets. Pocket watch: 18 ct., two body, half-hunting form, engine-turned à grains d'orge, with aperture to reveal the dial, the cover opened by a button in the pendant, and locked closed by a bolt in the band. Dial: Regulator type, silvered and engine-turned, signed: "Breguet No. 1", the subsidiary hour ring with engraved Roman numerals, outer minute ring with Arabic 10 minute numerals, and subsidiary seconds on the edge of the tourbillon aperture. Sector for the up-and-down scale calibrated for 36 hours and an aperture for the moon phase with the age engraved on the border. Blued-steel Breguet hands. Movement: Maillechort, 13"', with fausses cOtes decoration, 23 jewels, lateral lever escapement and monometallic screw balance. Blued-steel Breguet autocompensating balance spring. One minute tourbillon with equidistant three-arm polished steel carriage driven off the third wheel. Mechanism for the instantaneous re-setting of the minute hand to exact time every two T ours mounted under the dial, and correcting the watch for a difference of up to plus-or-minus five minutes, controlled through the winding crown by the clock, along with the automatic rewinding, whenever the watch is placed in the location provided. An autonomy of 24 hours is assured from a rewinding period of 8 hours. Diam. 36 mm. B) Case: 18 ct., Empire style, glazed on four sides and hermetically sealed. Applied hand-chased mounts on all sides, inset against a matted ground, with stylised flower heads around the base, the centre motifs terminating with palm foliage, the flat section corinthian pilasters capped by sun flowers. Recessed panels and the top plate all engine-turned à grains d'orge. Spirally gadrooned bun feet, and turned finials of slightly flattened form with substantial folding handle chased with flowers and lotus leaves and supported by lion heads. Signed on an oval polished white gold plaque at the base: "Breguet - Sympathique - No. 1". Calendar adjustment and hand-setting by means of a female square and push-pieces inset flush into the side pilasters. Hinged and rising bezel allowing the watch to be inserted with either the gold or leather bracelet still partly attached. Dial: Silvered and engine-turned, signed: " Breguet, No. 1", with Roman hour numerals on a plain reserve. Blued-steel Breguet hands. Giltmetal engine-turned dial mask, with sectorshaped apertures for month with date to the left, week day to the right, and sectors above for equation of time on the left and bimetallic thermometer to the right. Moon phase visible at the back of the wristwatch compartment, with blue enamel and gold disk, the age engraved on the border. Movement: Frosted and gilt brass, eight-day going, the twin barrels mounted in the base and wound by a retractable lever below the bottom plate, providing power for both the clock itself and Xe winding and hand-setting of the wristwatch. Remontoire train and the escapement mounted on a horizontal triangular platform rewinding at intervals of 5 seconds. Spring detent escapement, with gold escape wheel, Guillaume balance in brass and invar, with old and platinum adjusting screws. Twin helical gold balance springs, mounted above and below the balance, and working in apposition. Engraved silvered sector for up-and-down scale on the movement top plate. Dim. 255 x 170 x 125 mm. Estimate: SFr. * *

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1991-04-14
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AN EXTRAORDINARY AND RARE PLATINUM DOUBLE DIALLED WRISTWATCH WITH TWELVE COMPLICATIONS:  MINUTE REPEATER, TOURBILLON, PERPETUAL CALENDAR

PATEK PHILIPPE, AN EXTRAORDINARY AND RARE PLATINUM DOUBLE DIALLED WRISTWATCH WITH TWELVE COMPLICATIONS:  MINUTE REPEATER, TOURBILLON, PERPETUAL CALENDAR, RETROGRADE DATE, SKY CHART, MOON PHASES AND ORBIT, SIDEREAL TIME CIRCA 2003 REF 5002P SKY MOON TOURBILLON MVT 3350019 CASE 4214427, AN EXTRAORDINARY AND RARE PLATINUM DOUBLE DIALLED WRISTWATCH WITH TWELVE COMPLICATIONS:  MINUTE REPEATER, TOURBILLON, PERPETUAL CALENDAR, RETROGRADE DATE, SKY CHART, MOON PHASES AND ORBIT, SIDEREAL TIME CIRCA 2003 REF 5002P SKY MOON TOURBILLON MVT 3350019 CASE 4214427 Cal. 109, nickel lever movement stamped with the seal of Geneva, 55 jewels, free-sprung Gyromax balance, one minute tourbillon composed of 69 parts and weighing 0.3 grams, 9k gold third wheel with curved crossing, tourbillon balance wheel and fourth wheel on one axis, adjusted to heat, cold, isochronism and 5 positions, two polished hammers minute repeating on two extra-long steel alloy 'Cathedral' gongs, revolving governor with pierced and engraved bridge in the form of a Calatrava cross • gold front dial with a silvery opaline coating, engraved with repeating Patek Philippe Calatrava cross logo, applied white gold Roman numerals, chemin-de-fer minute ring, four subsidiary dials indicating day, month, leap year cycle and ages of the moon displayed in white gold, retrograde date display in red enamel from 2 to 10, reverse dial of sapphire crystal glass with silvered 24-hour scale and Arabic numerals around inside edge for sidereal time, silvered ellipse framing the visible sky (marked out with the cardinal points), planisphere of the Northern Hemisphere rotates counterclockwise above the dial, this disc with small aperture to reveal the phases of the moon, skeletonized white-lacquered gold feuille hands show the hours and minutes • platinum case with two polished bezels, screw-set down-turned lugs, case band and minute repeating slide finely engraved with halved Calatrava crosses, two crowns both embossed with a Calatrava cross for winding and setting, four small recessed buttons for correction of the front dial displays • front dial inscribed Tourbillon 3350019, dial signed Patek Philippe Geneva, case and movement signed • with a platinum PP buckle    DIAMETER 42.8MM.

  • HKGHongkong (S.A.R. Kina)
  • 2008-04-09
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An extremely attractive and most probably unique yellow gold...

Patek Philippe Case, dial, movement and buckle signed The Patek Philippe reference 2499, in any dial or case combination, can be considered one of, if not the most iconic and desirable trophy watches to crown any collection. However, an example fresh to the market with a unique champagne dial in mint condition accompanied with its original Certificate of Origin and correspondence elevates its collectability to Himalayan heights. This yellow gold reference 2499/100 with champagne dial or “doré” was made upon special order and is accompanied by a series of correspondence between the original owner, the retailer and Patek Philippe between 1979 and 1981 regarding the order and even more amusingly a long series of epistolary exchanges where the owner expresses his ultimate dissatisfaction (in a very understated manner) in receiving the watch with one strap mounted back to front! In fact the owner was so upset that the watch remained almost completely unworn and the strap remaining back to front, his curse being transformed today to a blessing for the collector who will own an unmolested timepiece.Reference 2499 was produced between 1951 (replacing the iconic reference 1518) and 1985, in a limited number of approximately 349 examples. Its large 37.5mm case, down turned stepped lugs, beautifully balanced dial layout and superlative complicated movement stamped with the Geneva seal make this reference one of the most exciting watches to leave the Patek Philippe ateliers.Patek Philippe initially used famed case maker, Vichet, to manufacture the 2499’s case, however early on switched their production to the Wenger atelier. The Vichet case had pronounced, elongated lugs, and a flat case back, while the Wenger case featured a beautifully domed caseback with more compact lugs, as found on the present timepiece.Patek Philippe evolved the dial designs as well, and can be categorized into the following four series:• First series: distinguished by square chronograph pushers, applied Arabic numerals and tachymeter scale.• Second series: first to use round chronograph pushers, either applied Arabic numerals or baton indexes, and tachymeter scale.• Third series: round chronograph buttons, applied baton indexes and outer seconds divisions, the tachymeter scale has been removed.• Fourth series: to which the present example belongs, round chronograph pushers, applied baton indexes and out seconds division, with sapphire crystal, reference 2499/100.The present timepiece, in superb condition, comes mounted with its original strap which has remained mounted back to front, original certificate indicating the “doré” or champagne dial, hang tag as well as the different exchanges between the original owner, "Watches of Switzerland", the London based retailer and Patek Philippe allowing us to delve partially in the relationship between the three parties involved in commissioning and creating this superb icon.The case displays strong definition to the lugs, and well-preserved hallmarks, and the wonderful dial with its unusual champagne color is perfectly crisp and devoid of marks. The reference 2499 is a milestone in the history of wristwatches and when a unique piece in such untouched condition appears on the auction room for the first time it is an opportunity that the discerning collector cannot let go.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2018-05-13
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Attributable to John Rich and Decombaz, circa 1805, casemaker's mark "JGR & Cie" (Jean Georges Reymond & Cie), made for the Chinese market

Attributable to John Rich and Decombaz, circa 1805, casemaker's mark "JGR & Cie" (Jean Georges Reymond & Cie), made for the Chinese market.Magnificent and extremely rare, 18K gold and enamel, pearl-set musical center-seconds scent flask fitted with a watch, with carillon and exceptional automaton scene. C. Entirely painted on enamel, the front housing the watch movement, the back the musical automaton, the former entirely decorated with red, green and imperial blue translucent champlevé enamel over Barleycorn flinqué, aperture for the watch movement with half-pearl frame, above, an enameled medallion of a young lady in a half pearl frame within an applied gold flower and leaf wreath, below the dial, applied gold flower garlands and garlands made of half-pearls, the stopper with pearl-set base,opped by a gold acorn decorated with blue champlevé enamel, oval fluted base with eight lobed sectors above, each decorated with a red palm motif on an azure enamel ground. The automaton side with a double painted on enamel panel in the center, illustrating a biblical emblem represented by the greenness of the palm tree which symbolizes the deeds of the just that will grow and evolve like the palm tree in the desert, pearl-set frame, above, an enameled portrait of a lady, all set on translucentmperial blue enamel over Barleycorn flinqué, the sides pierced, enameled and engraved with a repeated foliate pattern. Below the panels to the right, a knob which, when pressed, opens the panels and animates the scene as the music plays. The scene, in painted enamel and multicolored gold, represents a lady playing the dulcimer with a pair of hammers and nodding her head in rhythm, a gentleman beating time to the music with his arm, and a lady listening to the music, who applauds when the concertis over. When she has stopped clapping the panels automatically close. D. White enamel, radial Roman numerals, outer minute/seconds and half-minute/ seconds divisions, outer fifteen minute/seconds Arabicmarkers. Very fine blued steel and gilt "olive-shaped" hands.M. 41,2 mm, gilt full plate, cylindrical pillars, cylinder escapement, plain three-arm brass balance with under-sprung blued steel balance spring, unusual horn-shaped cock with the top symmetrically pierced and engraved with a foliate pattern, ruby endstone.Musical mechanism: Gilt, skeletonized and partially engraved, pinned barrel carillon with five hammers and five bells, each hammer adjustable to regulate the strength of the blow, fusee and chain assuring the constant tempo of the music, fly regulator. The movement is fixed to the case with three suspension levers, to eliminate dampening of the music by the case. The automaton scene is animated by a complex mechanism, placed underneath it, comprising 25 levers, 12 gears and 8 springs, driven byhe musical train.The number "144" painted under the dial and stamped on the movement, the flask stopper stamped "JGR" (Jean-Georges Reymond).Dim. Height 21cm, base width 9,5 cm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2001-10-13
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Precision Timekeeper with 1 ComplicationAntide Janvier, Horloger Mécanicien du Roy, Au(x) Louvre, circa 1800.Unique and spectacular, astronomical, 3 w

Precision Timekeeper with 1 ComplicationAntide Janvier, Horloger Mécanicien du Roy, Au(x) Louvre, circa 1800.Unique and spectacular, astronomical, 3 week-going, weight-driven, "resonance" double pendulum wall regulator with two independent trains. C. Attributed to Jean-Ferdinand-Joseph Schwerdfeger (1734-1819), mahogany, glazed on both sides and the front with gilt borders, rectangular cresting above molded cornice, molded base fitted with starting device and two pins for controlling the wall distance. D. Two similar dials numbered one and two, silvered and matte, shaped at the top, arched at the bottom, No. 1 with digital hour display, minute ring set in the center with Arabic five-minute markers, seconds set at the lowest part, No. 2 thsame but without hour indication. Blued steel "arrow" hands.M. 17 x 9 cm, two independently working movements, rectangular, brass, both mounted to a very heavy, 20 mm-thick brass plate, Huygens endless rope winding with heavy brass circular weight, four-wheel trains, two independent seconds-beating Ellicott compensation compound pendulums, each with pin-wheel escapement with half-round pins and with unusual impulse delivered via a spring fixed to a suspension spring bracket with micrometric regulator screw. Case bottom equipped with a starting mechanismy Paul Garnier in 1832, ensuring that upon starting, the pendulums are put into cross swinging mode.Signed on the dial and the pendulums.Dim. Length 164 cm, base width 37 cm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2001-11-11
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John and james harrison, a historically significant ebonized precision

11¾-inch restored dial with silvered chapter ring signed Jno Harrison, Barrow and set on a broken-arch wood dial plate, decorated with gilt stylized flowers and strap work, the center with putti and apertures for calendar and seconds, the arch signed James Harrison, a maintaining power lever on the upper right side, large wood plated movement with oak wheels, lignum vitae lantern pinions and bushes, grasshopper escapement with brass escape wheel and replaced  adjustable cycloidal cheeks on the backplate, the strike with inside countwheel cut from the great wheel and top mounted bell, the replaced pendulum with brass and steel gridiron rod and calibrated regulation nut, the case with domed caddy cresting and gilt-wood finials, gilt capped hood pilasters, the trunk with shaped top to the door and inset with a gilt-wood lenticle, and a replica equation table behind a glazed panel, the plain plinth with moulded base, the sides with raised panels to allow for the oscillation of the pendulum bob, with a folder containing the history of the clock provided by the late Colonel Quill. John Harrison (1693-1776) is remembered particularly for the wonderful sea clocks that he made in his quest to solve the problem of finding longitude at sea. His early clocks, such as the present longcase clock, had movements that were made of wood and which incorporate a number of unique features which were later used in his sea clocks. His skill with wood was inherited from his father Henry Harrison (1665-1728) who was a joiner. The family moved to Barrow-upon-Humber, a remote village in North Lincolnshire, in 1697 and John Harrison continued to live and work there until the age of 44. Trained by his father to be a joiner he would have been involved in many of the activities in the village and particularly relevant was his involvement with the church and the re-hanging of bells. He was interested in music and undertook the training of the church choir. He must have had an early fascination with horology as he had completed his first clock by 1713 and no doubt had experimented with many test pieces before this. With a lively intellect, and working in isolation away from any of the usual horological manufacturing districts, he developed some unique ways of overcoming the problems of keeping a clock running and ensuring good timekeeping. Although principally a joiner, John Harrison found time to make at least eight clocks between 1713 and 1730 which can be divided into two separate groups. All have wooden movements but the first three, dated 1713, 1715 and 1717, have a conventional brass escape wheel and steel pivots running in brass bushes. The success of these early clocks must have gained him something of a reputation as a maker of clocks because he was commissioned by Sir Charles Pelham of Brocklesby Park to make a clock for the stable turret about 1720. He set about this challenging task by constructing the movement and wheel train from wood, but on a much larger scale than his previous clocks. He anticipated the problems that could arise for a clock that was housed in an uninsulated building and which would have probably been damp at certain times of the year. He realized that steel pivots running in brass bushes would soon suffer from corrosion and so he used brass pivots running in lignum vitae; no doubt his work as a joiner had alerted him to the special oily characteristics of this hard wood. The escapement caused problems and, after installation, Harrison was called back to attend to the clock on a number of occasions because difficulties arose with the running that could be attributed to the design of the escapement. After many experiments John Harrison designed a new escapement, now known as 'grasshopper’ which will run successfully without lubrication.  At this time he appears to have made other alterations such as fitting roller pinions, with lignum vitae rollers, and anti-friction rollers.  All of these alterations seem to have been designed to allow the clock to run without lubrication thereby overcoming the inadequacies of the oil that was available at the time. The problems that Harrison encountered and overcame with this turret clock were to set him on the path of seeking to develop precision timekeeping which was to occupy him for the rest of his life. By the early 1720’s James Harrison (1704-1766), John’s younger brother, had started to take an active interest in the clocks being made by his brother and indeed his name appears on the surviving precision longcase clocks that were made from 1725 onwards.  It is possible that he assisted his brother in the manufacture of the Brocklesby Park clock since it is signed Harrison without a forename. Like his brother and father James was a skilled joiner but after 1725 seems to have concentrated on making three high-precision longcase clocks with his brother. After the Brocklesby Park clock was successfully completed John Harrison sought to make a smaller domestic clock which incorporated the various features that he had invented to improve the running of the turret clock. He completed the design of this first precision longcase clock by 1725 and proceeded to make it shortly afterwards, there followed a second clock dated 1727 and a third clock was completed by 1728. A fourth movement, probably never completed by the Harrison brothers, was finished by an unknown hand in the 19th century, original Harrison features had never been fitted or were later removed by the 19th century clockmaker.  This fourth clock was re-made in correct Harrison style in 1975 using clock three as a model. The longcase clocks kept such excellent time that John Harrison was encouraged to improve on what he had already achieved and thereby rise to the challenge of perfecting a precision timekeeper that could be used at sea. It seems that Harrison first heard of the Longitude Act in 1726 and shortly thereafter abandoned his work on domestic clocks to concentrate on working towards the manufacture of a precision sea clock. The longcase clock from the Time Museum is almost certainly the first longcase clock made by James and John Harrison and may be dated 1725/6. Neither it, nor clock no. 2 would have started life with a gridiron pendulum as Harrison did not invent that form of compensation until 1727/8. Clock no. 3, dated 1728, was probably the only clock to have been fitted originally with this type of pendulum. These longcase clocks are unique in design and immediately identifiable as coming from the Harrison workshop. The wooden frames are large and secured by twenty-two mortice-and-tenon joints which are glued together to increase rigidity. The dial is fitted directly on to the frame thereby dispensing with dial pillars. The construction of the wheels is remarkable; the main body of each wheel is slotted around the circumference and individual segments of oak teeth are set into the body to ensure that the grain is radial all round the wheel to give the greatest possible strength. The history of the three completed clocks is complex and it is remarkable that all three have survived to the present day. Clock no. 2, dated 1727, was sold by John Harrison and is now in a private collection. Clock no. 3, dated 1728, is now owned by the Clockmakers’ Company, London and can be seen in their museum. The first clock, included in this Time Museum sale, has had an eventful history. It was discovered in dilapidated condition by Colonel Quill in 1954; the dial and case had been overpainted in a pinkish brown color and the dial decorated in the Victorian manner. It is this clock that Harrison depended upon to test the first of his sea clocks and it seems it remained in the Harrison family for many years. Letters exist which refer to a Harrison regulator 'Clock no.1’ which James Harrison (died 1875) was repairing for its owner John Harrison (1761-1842). The repairs had not been completed at the time of John Harrison’s death in 1842 and in March of 1843 James Harrison wrote to John’s widow requesting payment for work that he had done. The history of the clock then becomes obscure and it is likely that it was sold out of the Harrison family. When Colonel Quill acquired the clock in 1954 from a Mr. Barton-King he learned that Mr. Barton-King’s father (Andrew King), who had been a journeyman to a Hull clockmaker, had found Harrison no. 1 in the cellar of an old inn in Hull by the name of the Old Malt Shovel circa 1861/5. Apparently it had lain there amongst a lot of debris for many years. It was subsequently restored, probably by Andrew King, since his grandson related to Colonel Quill in 1973 that he remembered, as a youth, seeing a Harrison clock movement in his grandfather’s workshop. From information gathered from a newspaper Colonel Quill tracked down the Harrison no. 1 longcase clock to a private address in Hull where it was being stored on behalf of its then owner Mr. Barton-King.  The clock was eventually purchased by Colonel Quill who took the movement back to his flat in London and delivered the case to C.A. Ilbert who agreed to store it in his house until restoration could be arranged. Ilbert died before the restoration was commenced and so the clock case was moved to the British Horological Institute in Clerkenwell and stored in their library. Considerable trouble was taken to restore the clock case and dial to as near what they must have been like originally. A full record of the restoration was made by Colonel Quill and is included with the clock in this sale. The clock was sold by Colonel Quill to Seth Atwood in 1980 and was exhibited in the Time Museum until it closed on March 12, 1999. See Quill, John Harrison: The Man Who Found Longitude, pp. 23-30, where the author discusses "The Precision Regulator Clocks of John and James Harrison". Also see p. 22, fig. 8, for an illustration of the present lot. To the best of our knowledge it would appear that the present precision longcase clock most likely represents the only known clock made by John Harrison to be offered in recent times at public auction.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-10-15
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"Enigma M4" Cypher Machine, c. 1942

"Enigma M4" Cypher Machine, c. 1942 4-rotor naval Enigma machine, no. M 4609, by Chiffriermaschinengesellschaft Heimsoeth und Rinke, Berlin ("jla"), rotor no. M 4609 III, VI and VII, extra wheel Gamma, reflector wheel UKW-B, numbered plug board, connector to external 4V line, removable lamp panel, lamps replaced. Included is a group of related documents in copy. – Very good original working condition, electrical functions checked. An important example of the legendary World War II ciphering machine developed by Berlin engineer Dr. Arthur Scherbius and first manufactured there commercially by the Chiffriermaschinen Aktiengesellschaft Berlin in 1923. So complex was the Enigma, it was considered capable of producing over 22 billion code combinations without a single repetition. According to an early prospectus, "if someone worked continuously day and night and tried a different cipher-key every minute, it would take him 42,000 years to exhaust all combination possibilities". In operation, each keystroke illuminated a different character and caused one or more rotors to shift fractionally, so that a different combination was created every time. Decryption required codebooks and a list of daily key settings. The more secure 4-rotor Enigma, developed exclusively for the German Navy, was incorporated into Atlantic submarines in 1942. The seemingly impenetrable cyphers posed a serious challenge to the British armed forces until their capture of the abandoned U-559 in October 1942 altered the course of the war. – The captured submarine yielded not only an Enigma machine, but also its key-settings. Thanks to this discovery, Allied Forces were now able to decrypt intercepted German naval cypher. In order to disguise this fact from the German military, British Intelligence Services valorized the work of mathematicians Alan M. Turing and Alfred Knox, who continued to work on decryption methods with the first programmable electromagnetic computer ("The Bombe") at Bletchley Park. – The techniques of the British mathematicians were indebted to the work of Polish cryptologist Marian Rejewski and his colleagues, who had cracked the code of the 3-rotor Enigma machine as early as 1932 by rebuilding an Enigma machine! Turing had no progress till the Polish solutions and hand-made Enigma copies were brought to Bletchley park in 1939! The British "Bombe" was in fact an improved version of the Polish "Bomba" already in use since 1940. The available "Bombes" were fast enough for deciphering the codes of the 3-rotor Enigma used by the airforce, but too slow to make headway with the 4-rotor machines which employed each code book for a short time only. The result was the development of Turing's programmable computer in its first form (named "Colossus") – in use from December 1943. – An important artifact and milestone of military history! Chiffriermaschine "Enigma M4", um 1942 4-Rotor-Schlüsselmaschine (Schlüssel M) der Deutschen Kriegsmarine, Prüfnummer M 4609, Hersteller: Chiffriermaschinengesellschaft Heimsoeth und Rinke, Berlin ("jla"). Mit 4 Original-Walzen bezeichnet Nr. M 4609 III, VI und VII, Zusatzwalze Gamma, Umkehrwalze B, mit Zahlen bezeichnetes Steckerbrett, abnehmbare Lampenabdeckung, Anschluß für externe Stromversorgung (4 V), Glühlampen ersetzt. Die M4 war kryptographisch deutlich sicherer als die 3-Walzen-Chiffriermaschinen von Heer und Luftwaffe und wurde von den deutschen U-Booten eingesetzt. Mit umfangreicher Dokumentation (Kopien). – Legendäre und geheimnisumwobene deutsche Glühlampen-Chiffrier-maschine, die den Verlauf des 2. Weltkrieges entscheidend beeinflußte und zu seinem Ende beitrug, nachdem sie zuvor die deutsche Vorherrschaft zur See begründet hatte, bis es den Engländern im Oktober 1942 gelang, das havarierte U-Boot "U-559" samt Besatzung und "Enigma"-Ausrüstung zu kapern, ohne daß es die deutschen Befehlshaber bemerkten. So fielen ihnen neben der Enigma M4 auch die kompletten Schlüsselunterlagen in die Hände. Um das zu verbergen, heroisierten die englischen Militärs die beiden Mathematiker Alfred Knox und Alan M. Turing zu "Superhirnen", die es mit der Konstruktion des ersten frei programmierbaren Elektronenrechners "The Bombe" geschafft haben wollten, den Enigma-Code zu entschlüsseln! Das war aber nur Legende, denn "The Bombe" war nur ein von Turing verbesserter Nachbau der polnischen "Bomba" und seit Mitte Mai 1940 im Einsatz! Der frei programmierbare Elektronenrechner wurde in seiner ersten Ausführung ab Dezember 1943 benutzt und hatte den Namen "Colossus". Die verfügbaren "Bombes" waren schnell genug für das Lösen von Schlüsseln der 3-Walzen-Enigmas der Wehrmacht. Die nötige Geschwindigkeit zum Lösen der Schlüssel der 4-Walzen-Enigmas der Kriegsmarine brachte erst der "Colossus". – Einkalkuliert auf deutscher Seite war die Eroberung von Enigmas nebst Schlüsselunterlagen durch den Gegner. Da die Schlüsselunterlagen aber nur für kurze Zeiträume gültig waren, meinte man, daß die Enigmas insgesamt sicher seien. Dieser Rechner wurde unmittelbar nach Kriegsende von den Engländern selbst vernichtet. Aber tatsächlich gelang dem polnischen Kryptologen Marian Rejewski bereits 1932 die Dechiffrierung mit einem kompletten Nachbau. – Der "Enigma" war es dank ihres genialen Konstrukteurs Dr. Arthur Scherbius, Berlin, möglich, über 22 Milliarden (!!) Code-Kombina tionen ohne jede Wiederholung zu produzieren. Bildlich gesprochen hieße das: Wenn man jede Minute einen neuen Code benutzt und Tag und Nacht arbeitete, würde man 42.000 Jahre benötigen, um alle Code-Kombinationen auszuschöpfen. – Das hier exzellent funktionierende 4-Walzengerät ist komplett, mit Original-Holzkasten, Steckern und Lampen, und ist für nicht-druckenden Einsatz bestimmt. Bei jedem Tastendruck leuchtet ein anderes Zeichen auf, das notiert werden muß. Auch der wiederholte Druck auf dieselbe Taste führt immer wieder ein anderes Leuchtzeichen aus, ganz so, wie es der eingestellte Code zuläßt. – Zur Dechiffrierung mußte der vereinbarte Code eingestellt und die Nachricht durch simuliertes Abschreiben "lesbar" gemacht werden. – Eine technisch wie gesamthistorisch absolute Rarität von höchstem Stellenwert! – Eins der ganz großen technisch-historischen Sammlungsstücke! Start Price: €26000 (3+/2)

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-30
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A magnificent and spectacular 22k and 18k gold, silver, mother-of-pearl

• Swiss B21 quartz movement, 13 jewels • finely engined-turned gold dial, diamond-set chapter ring with emerald and ruby applied numerals • bezel set with brilliant-cut diamonds • dial and movement set within a spherical pearl form, finely decorated with mother-of-pearl scalloped inlay, four sculptured yellow gold frolicking seahorses at the quarters, the pearl encased within a magnificent realistically molded yellow gold Oyster shell with textured finish in relief, the shell hinged to open and reveal the dial, inside of the shell further inlaid with mother-of-pearl, the outside further decorated with gold and diamond-set accents, the catch molded as a smaller diamond-set oyster shell, the whole shell resting upon a realistically sculptured gold, rock crystal and diamond-set cascading wave, on a large oval rock crystal base with yellow gold decorated border accented with yellow gold shells and seahorses and set with cabochon aquamarine • case, dial and movement signed and stamped PPC     With a Patek Philippe Extract from the Archives confirming production in 1991 and sale on May 20th, 1992.  The Extract additionally states that the clock is set with diamonds weighing 42.29 carats, cabochon emeralds weighing 0.34 carats and cabochon aquamarine 9.02 carats. The total weight of 22k gold is 1100 grams. The total weight of 18k gold is 2459 grams. The total weight of silver is 1100 grams.  The total weight of the clock is 9.3 kilograms.  With a Patek Philippe presentation box.

  • HKGHongkong (S.A.R. Kina)
  • 2013-04-07
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The Sacred Mountain In the manner of James Cox, London, Anglo/Chinese (Qianlong period) circa 1780. Magnificent, highly important ormolu, silver, enam

The Sacred Mountain In the manner of James Cox, London, Anglo/Chinese (Qianlong period) circa 1780. Magnificent, highly important ormolu, silver, enamel and jeweled musical automata clock for the Oriental market, representing the Sacred Mountain of Taoism. C. Formed in three tiers, supported on scrolling flower and leaf feet with hinged foliate drape to the front concealing the clock's winding arbors. Lower tier: set to the front with the clock dial within a paste-set bezel and flanked by a pair of enameled contrary rotating whirligigs, all set on a translucent blue guilloché enamel panel within paste-set borders, the sides and back similarly set with floral-decorated enameled geometric sound frets within blue enamel panels. The rear panel with wnding hole for the musical movement. Center tier: in the form of a paste-set gilt theater within ormolu balustrades with rotating budding tree peonies in ormolu vases at each corner, and flanked by rotating silver and gilt inlaid foliate-decorated blue enameled columns, the similarly enameled side panels set with painted oval miniatures in the manner of William Hamilton R.A., depicting pastoral scenes of springtime lovers, the painted silk curtain, of an English classical garden, rising to reveaa gilded cavern within the sacred mountain, and eleven exquisitely carved and painted ivory automaton figures depicting at the top, the Three Officials, San-Kuan, and below set on a carrousel the eight immortals of Ba Xian, growing within the rocky landscape are peach trees and ferns. Upper tier: set within ormolu balustrades to the rock-strewn ground and at each corner with four further rotating tree peonies, stands a realistically modeled silver elephant with animated ears and tail and an artculated segmented trunk giving lifelike movements in all directions, the whole surmounted by a fine ormolu floral-chased saddle decorated with paste-set bees, and a sacred gourd vase set with six enamel and paste-set whirligigs and a rotating flowering peony tree finial. D. White enamel with roman numerals and outer Arabic minute ring, gilt heart-shaped hour and minute hands and blued steel counter-poised center seconds hand.M. Clock: Five-pillar two-train rack and bell hour-striking fusee movement with knife-edge verge escapement, short bob pendulum and center seconds, the winding effected at the base of the clock through transmission wheels mounted on the back plate, a roller cam and lever activating the musical and automaton movements on the hour. Musical: Massive four-pillar fusee and chain movement driving a pinned cylinder playing a single Chinese-style melody on a carillon of nine bells, tuned to a pentatonicscale, with nine hammers. Automaton: activated by the musical movement, a series of indirect gearing drives respectively, the rotating whirligigs in the lower tier, the eight tree peony vases on the center and top tiers, the four enameled pillars on the center section, the raising and lowering of the theater curtain, the carrousel and the figures within, and the six whirligigs and peony tree mounted on the sacred urn, in addition a subsidiary automaton movement concealed in the elephant's body oerates its meticulous articulations. As well as being released on the hour the musical and automaton movements can be activated at will.The clock is presented on an imposing later mahogany stand of Chinese Chippendale design with a fine inset ormolu gallery and blind fretwork frieze resting on cluster column legs.Dim.: Clock: Height 90 cm., width 38.5 cm., depth 32 cm.Stand: Height 109 cm., width 76 cm., depth 70 cm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2003-06-14
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An extremely rare

Rolex Case, dial, movement and clasp signed Just a few decades ago, before becoming the luxury powerhouse it is today, Rolex had a very different brand image. The company was established in its earliest form in London in 1905 as Wilsdorf and Davis. At the time, watches were not fashion accessories in the least, but rather proper tools used for the most varied activities: from the most mundane “time telling” for the everyday user, to the most sophisticated calculations of military navigators (at sea first, in the air later). The founder Hans Wilsdorf’s vision was to provide accurate, durable and reliable timepieces which could withstand continued professional usage; the idea of providing luxury goods was still light years away. In fact, reference 6062 can be considered one of the earliest forays of the company into the luxury goods market. Up until the 1950s, Rolex's production consisted mostly of chronograph pieces or simple calendar (Datejust) watches. The most remarkable innovations introduced by Rolex in the first part of the past century (and, considering their impact on the field, possibly ever) were not complicated tourbillons or refined carillon repeaters. Rather, they were the rotor for automatic winding, and the waterproof Oyster case: two unfathomably ingenious, useful and equally practical inventions.From this point of view, reference 6062 is a momentous milestone: for the first time Rolex went out of its “comfort zone” of relatively simple pieces and tried to create a complicated dress wristwatch. This was a double effort, as at the same time also the non-waterproof reference 8171 - featuring the same set of complications - was released. The fact that these two references are now among the rarest models made by the house speaks volumes about how that experiment went: in the eyes of the public, Rolex was not yet so strongly associated with complicated watches, albeit it had already grown to being one of the most important watchmakers in the world, and the market gave the models a lukewarm reception. In fact, after this experience, Rolex focused on professional pieces (chronographs, dual-time watches, simple calendars) until the 1990s, and it would take more than half a century to issue another moon phase model, which happened last year with the Cellini ref. 50535.When analyzing reference 6062, one cannot help but appreciate how it truly feels like a luxury evolution of a sport’s watch. First and foremost, the Oyster case makes it a waterproof piece, which is somewhat of a contradiction for a luxury watch, especially at that time. Furthermore, it is equipped with an automatic rotor. To give a comparison, Patek Philippe produced no waterproof calendar pieces, with exception of the very rare reference 2438/1, until the late 1980s. Compounding to the “clash of souls”, reference 6062 was mostly produced in yellow gold, another oddity for a waterproof case. As a matter of fact, reference 6062 is among the very rare vintage Rolex models to feature a gold production higher than steel.Thus, the piece offered here not only is an example of one of the most unusual, historically important and attractive Rolex models ever made, but it is furthermore a representative of the extremely scarce steel variety of such model. While this is more than enough to conquer the heart and mind of the collector, it furthermore features an exquisitely well preserved two tone dial: fully original and without any kind of intervention, it is highlighted by the different grené finish of the outer date ring. It is interesting to point out how stainless steel examples of the reference appear to feature exclusively the “Semi-Explorer” dial configuration (with Arabic 3 and 9, reminiscent of the famous 3/6/9 Explorer dial) in either steel or gold color. This layout bolsters the utilitarian appeal of the piece, and when featuring gold colored markers - such as in this watch - it creates a very pleasing contrast with the steel case. When talking about the case of this piece, one cannot omit to mention its excellent condition: the lugs are full and their proportions intact, the pinholes for the bracelet bars are well defined and properly distanced from the edges of the lugs and the "Modèle Déposé" engraving on the case back is crisp . Even the dedicated satin finish arrived to us very well preserved. An additional layer of appeal is also granted by the very rare and extremely attractive Rolex USA Jubilee bracelet. In the past decade no more than ten stainless steel examples of reference 6062 have appeared at auction and the present piece is one of the best preserved and original models we have seen.Compounding to its rarity, condition and undeniable aesthetic appeal, the present watch is furthermore appearing for the first time on the auction market: a true gem for the most demanding of vintage Rolex collectors.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2018-05-13
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Sid Vicious Arrested, Chelsea Hotel

Endowed with a sweet melancholic quality, Sid Vicious Arrested, Chelsea Hotel (1998) by Elizabeth Peyton is a highly dramatised work that re-lives the downward spiral of Sex Pistols icon Sid Vicious, as he is arrested for the murder of his then-girlfriend, Nancy Spungen. In a style akin to Douglas Blau and Richard Prince, Peyton reinterprets an image by photojournalist Allan Tannenbaum and reshapes Vicious in stillness and silence, as he appears enraptured by deep reflective melancholia. Detached from the frenzy and pandemonium, Peyton intimately zooms into Vicious, such that the viewer is compelled to gaze closely at the protagonist. Silencing the paparazzi behind a morose blue backdrop, the viewer only catches a subtle glimpse of the flash bulbs, and a blurred image of Vicious captor. In this solitary, almost dream-like moment, all logical elements of the situation are suspended and beauty trumps disenchantment. By distorting the original photograph, Peyton comments on the superficiality of the photographic image and its ability to distort and exaggerate moments. By diminishing the traditional distance of portraiture, she not only venerates her subjects as saints and icons, but also imbues them with a familiarity that resonates with romantic devotion: one that takes into account both their glories and faults. In the process, she reanimates nineteenth-century traditions of portraiture, which glorified high art, whilst also finding beauty in unifying the subject with expressions of humanity. Peyton explains: It's almost a nineteenth-century idea that what's on the inside appears on the outside. Balzac was into the curve of your nose or mouth expressing some kind of inner quality that it could be read on your face (Elizabeth Peyton quoted in: Elizabeth Peyton, The Index Magazine, 2000, online). Peyton thus pursues beauty not only through painting distant historical figures like Napoleon, but also by portraying far-from-perfect contemporaries, including Nirvanas Kurt Cobain and Sid Vicious. She awakens the vulnerability of her subjects, bringing them to life by dramatising their expressions. In this case, Peyton stages the very moment of Vicious arrest, emphasising the dark circles under his eyes, as he is further humanised by Peytons addition of a teardrop. Vicious features are idealised: his skin, pale; his lips, red; he is bestowed with androgynous qualities, which in spite of his angst-ridden visage, bestow a sense of youth and innocence. In the process, she casts a feminine gaze over her icon, trumping the archaic system that forces men to appear macho and unfeeling; in a Caravaggio-esque manner Peyton portrays Vicious as a virginal male. As punk and Sex Pistols historian, Jon Savage, adds, It's all right for disco divas to take off the slap when they get home, but rock stars have to be who they are, offstage and on. This absurd state of affairs crucifies lives and stunts individual and collective growth. Peyton is careful to emphasise male tenderness (Jon Savage, Boys keep swinging, Elizabeth Peyton, Frieze, November-December 1996, online). Rather than diminishing Vicious rock star image, Peyton balances illusion with reality, to awaken the inner and hidden qualities of her protagonist. Large-in-scale in comparison to many of the artists portraits, Sid Vicious Arrested is a seminal work that democratises portraiture by borrowing from a public photograph and subsequently reimagines it as fiction. Titled and numbered EP 269 on the reverse

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2018-06-26
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A historically important and unique stainless steel prototype tourbillon

Omega Dial and buckle signed Behind the apparent simplicity of its large diameter, stainless steel case and elegant two tone dial, resides the horological equivalent of a Formula 1 racecar. Since the 1980s, the tourbillon has joined the elite circle of complications to be set within a wristwatch, displaying the maker’s expertise in miniaturizing this system invented in 1801. Prior to that period, tourbillon escapements were quasi exclusively reserved to pocket watches. The present timepiece, featuring a tourbillon escapement with Guillaume balance, sheds a new light on the history of this complication in wristwatch form as it is most certainly the first prototype of a series of Omega wristwatch tourbillons from the late 1940 that unfortunately never saw the light of day.In 1947, Omega created twelve Calibre 30 I tourbillon movements of only 30mm in diameter to run in the “wristwatch” category of the Geneva, Neuchatel and Kew-Teddington Observatory trials. In these movements, the tourbillons had a rotation rate of 7.5 minutes as opposed to the more habitual 60 seconds.In these trials, manufacturers would submit one or several specially prepared movements for competition. Interestingly, these watches were never meant for sale, the purpose of these trials being not only competition but also a testing ground for research on chronometry and of course a marketing and communication tool for the manufacturer in selling their “regular production” watches.Prior to being allowed to compete, entrants were tested, and those meeting the rigorous standards were eligible for actual competition. The watches were tested in 5 positions and 3 temperatures (4°C, 20°C and 30°C) for a period of 40 to 44 days. Each movement was graded on a performance scale and awarded a certificate with the final score and rating.It is important to note that these movements did not have a particularly fine aesthetic finish but were technically the best of the best: the surfaces of pinions and wheels were highly polished with exceptionally even tolerances, springs were pre-tested and hand chosen and the dimensions of shafts and bearings perfectly executed.To make an easy comparison, these competitions were to watch brands what Formula 1 racing is to car manufactures: a laboratory and a perfect display of their knowhow and mastery.Omega’s twelve Calibre 30 I participated in several trials between 1947 and 1952 and, in 1950, even achieved the highest result that had been obtained up until then within the wristwatch category in Geneva.In 1987, seven of these twelve movements were discovered by Omega and entirely rebuilt, they were then cased in gold and silver livery and offered to a select group of collectors.However, whereas it was always believed that these movements had only been created to participate in Observatory trials, illustrations and information contained in letters preserved at the Omega Museum showcase plans for a 30mm tourbillon movement to be housed in a wristwatch, at least one such movement was created thus increasing the total count of cal. 30 I to thirteen.In a letter dated 1947 and preserved in the Omega Museum, Mr. Marcel Vuilleumier, head of the Watchmaking School of the Vallée de Joux, dreading the arrival of American and British timepieces, underlines the necessity of the Swiss watchmaking industry to concentrate on precision timepieces and suggests creating a tourbillon wristwatch. Recently, an original drawing from the year 1947 of the design of a tourbillon wristwatch prototype case was discovered that further illustrates the proceedings towards the integration of the Calibre 30 I tourbillon movement into a production wristwatch.The present watch is proof that this project was advanced far enough to produce at least one pre-series model with the 30mm. tourbillon making it superbly and historically relevant.The present watch, in superb condition, is not only magnificently attractive but has immense significance in horological history, making it most probably the very first tourbillon wristwatch that was supposed to be produced in series.We sincerely thank Petros Protopapas of Omega and the Omega Museum for their invaluable research on the present lot.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2017-11-12
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"Au Prince Serge Galitzine" The Only Known Surviving Silver Breguet Carriage Clock Breguet, No. 3358, sold to Prince Serge Galitzine on March 31, 1826

"Au Prince Serge Galitzine" The Only Known Surviving Silver Breguet Carriage Clock Breguet, No. 3358, sold to Prince Serge Galitzine on March 31, 1826, for 3,600 Francs. Extremely fine and highly important, probably unique, small, silver, eight-day "Pendule a Almanach" carriage clock built on the principles of the "Garde Temps", with jeweled lever escapement, half-quarter repeating, alarm and day and date calendar. Accompanied by the very fine, original gold tooled red morocco leather fitted box, later silver mechanical key and a Breguet certificate. C. Silver, multi-piece, "Empire", glazed on four sides and the top, four Doric type pilasters, two on each corner, with anthemion and flower-head chased entablatures and bases, hinged front and back doors for access to the dial and the movement, engine-turned top with glazed center, pivoted handle with dog's head terminals, four ball finials, repeat button and alarm-pull, the base with sound-fret pierced with a classical vase issuing stylized foliage, four engine-turned bun feet. D. Silver with champlevé radial Roman numerals, outer minute dot divisions, inner dot alarm divisions, subsidiary seconds at 12, engine-turned center, gilt brass engine-turned plate with winding aperture and to the right, alarm setting in a gold cartouche, annular silver chapter rings for the day and date, silver plaque engraved with the number. Blued steel Breguet hands. M. Rectangular, 85 x 60 mm, gilt brass, going barrel, 5-wheel train, straight-line calibrated and counterpoised lever escapement set on a platform, pallet fork with jeweled pallets, roller with arrow-shaped impulse pin, cut bimetallic 2-arm compensation balance with temperature and timing adjustment screws, parachute on the top pivot, jeweled balance and escape wheel, blued steel Breguet balance spring, index regulator, Breguet all-or-nothing type repeating system repeating by a single hammer on a bell activated by depressing the push-piece at the top of the case, alarm on the same bell with its own hammer. Dial signed and numbered. Dim. Height 11.2 cm (without handle) width 8.7 cm, depth 6.5 cm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-10-15
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