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The Royal Presentation Mirror-Image Pair Geneva, Swiss, No. 2007 & 2008, the enamels depicting “Affection & Innocence” attributed to Jean-Abraham Liss

The Royal Presentation Mirror-Image Pair Geneva, Swiss, No. 2007 & 2008, the enamels depicting “Affection & Innocence” attributed to Jean-Abraham Lissignol (1749-1819) after an engraving by Francesco Bartolozzi, the cases No. 9703 & No. 9704 by Freres Oltramare (c. 1810/11 and 1826). Made circa 1815 for presentation in the name of King George III to the Chinese Emperor Jiaqing in 1816. An extraordinarily fine, magnificent and historically important, large, mirror-image pair of gold, painted on enamel and pearl-set, quarter-repeating pocket watches with special three-tone blued-steel decorated mirror-polished steel and gilt movements. Accompanied by the original morocco fitted presentation case, the lining embossed with the arms of King George III and a gold and painted on enamel key. C. Four-body, of unusual form, by Freres Oltramare, master mark “FO”, the full width of the band entirely set with large splitpearls giving a bowed effect, the bezel, pendant and bow entirely set with split pearls, the back cover with an extremely finely painted on enamel scene of “Affection & Innocence”, in mirror image to the second watch, large split pearl-set border. Hinged gold-rimmed glazed cuvette to view the movement. D.White enamel with bold radial Roman numerals, outer minute track, subsidiary seconds. Blued steel lozenge hands. M. 52 mm., 23’’’, unusual three-tone, gilt brass, mirror-polished steel and blued steel, Lepine-type calibre, brass plate and going barrel finely engraved with scrolling foliage, mirror-polished steel bridges and cocks, to the surfaces of which have applied finely pierced and chased blued steel foliate decoration, brass pivot bushes, jeweled cylinder escapement with steel escape wheel, three-arm balance with polished steel rim, flat balance spring, index regulator, repeating with two hammers on two square-section polished steel gongs activated by depressing the pendant. Diam. 62 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2008-11-16
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Breguet, Paris, No. 4111 "Montre plate à équation et à répétition, sur le principe des chronomètres, répétant l'heure, la demie, les quarts et les dem

Breguet, Paris, No. 4111 "Montre plate à équation et à répétition, sur le principe des chronomètres, répétant l'heure, la demie, les quarts et les demi-quarts". An exceptional 18K gold and silver equation of time watch with annual calendar, manual perpetual calendar, mean and true solar time, and half-quarter repeating, constructed on the principals of the garde-temps, in a Morocco fitted box No. 4111 Signed Breguet, Paris, No. 4111, sold on 10 January 1827 to Mr. Peyronnet for the sum of 7,500 Francs 25''' gilded brass movement, with going barrel, more than 21 jewels, straight line calibrated lever escapement with divided lift and straight pallets, banking against the escape wheel arbour, draw, cut bimetallic steel/platinum compensation balance with rims cut in the centre, sunk at the centre for the double roller, gold and platinum screws, with pare-chute suspension on both pivots, blued steel Breguet balance spring, the annual calendar driven from the gold days of the week wheel, making one revolution in five weeks, equation cam set at the centre of the annual wheel, ingenious system of transmitting power from the mean time motion work to the solar time motion work via special double wheel/double rack and pinion mechanism; repeating on a single blued steel gong with one hammer activated by a slide in the band, engine-turned silver dial by Pierre-Benjamin Tavernier, to the left true solar time subsidiary dial with Arabic radial numerals, outer minute track and yellow gold Breguet hands, symmetrically to the right mean time subsidiary dial with radial Roman numerals, outer minute track and yellow gold Breguet hands, subsidiary dial for the seconds at noon with blued steel equilibrated hand, fast/slow setting aperture above 6 o'clock surmounted on the left with days of the week aperture and on the right with leap year indication aperture, outermost annual date track with indication of the month of the year and their length and date of the months giving by a long "serpentine" yellow gold hand making one revolution in one year, circular engine-turned à grains d'orge three body "forme quatre baguettes" yellow gold case, silver engine-turned band; ball-shaped pendant and round bow, case no. 4072 by Tavernier's workshop (later Master mark "M A B"), dial signed 61.2 mm. diam.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2012-05-14
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Patek, Philippe & Cie., Genève, No. 80897, case No. 204270, made espe-cially in 1890 for Jean de Gradowski

Patek, Philippe & Cie., Genève, No. 80897, case No. 204270, made espe-cially in 1890 for Jean de Gradowski.Extremely rare, probably unique, 18K gold Grande Complication keyless astronomical double train Grande et Petite Sonnerie clockwatch with instantaneous perpetual calendar, phases of the moon, Julian and Gregorian calendars, minute repeating and chronograph with central 60-minute recorder, in Patek Philippe leather fitted box, accompanied by the Extract from the Archives. C. Four-body, solid, "bassine et filets", engine-turned back cover with the engraved coat-of-arms of Gradowski, reeded band, gold hinged cuvette, bolt at 4:30 hours for Grande or Petite Sonnerie, another at 9 for striking/silent, small pin at 3 for adjusting the Julian calendar every 131 years, at 10:30 a bolt for blocking the chronograph and at 2:30 a small tripping slide for repeater activation. D. White enamel, radial Roman numerals, outer minute divisions, outermost chronograph scale with fie-seconds/minute Arabic figures, four subsidiary sunk dials for days of the week, months of the four year leap cycle concentric with phases and age of the moon, Gregorian and Julian date and subsidiary seconds. Gold "spade" hands. M. 19''', nickel, "fausses-côtes" decoration, two-train, 38 jewels, straight line calibrated lever escapement, cut bimetallic compensation balance, Breguet balance spring, tandem winding, striking and repeating on gongsSigned on dial, case and movement.Diam. 54 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-06-08
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An early gold enamel pearl and gem-set singing bird automaton scent

The Case • the case of flattened pear form, one side with white enamel dial below an oscillating diamond-set balance, the other with a recessed richly painted singing bird perched on a leafy branch against a background of translucent pink enamel, bezels and borders of alternating rubies and half pearls, all surrounded by Renaissance-style gold paillon arabesques with birds and grotesques and urns of fruit over a translucent blue ground, the sides chased with similar ornament, partly enameled and set with rubies, emeralds, diamonds and sapphires, the top scent compartment with stopper combined with a watch key, enameled on both sides en suite, the stopper base stamped PG below a crown, the base with hinged mirror-lined compartment The Bird and Serinette • the bird [12 mm high] produces its song via a six pipe organ composed of two groups of three pipes following the curves of the case, the song is conveyed via metal tubes with compressed air from the bellows to the pipes and distributed by a pinned cylinder operating six valves; when activated, by a small gold button, the bird realistically sings, opens and closes his beak, swivels his body whilst his tail moves up and down The Watch • gilt brass verge movement with fusee, white enamel dial, Roman numerals, gold hands, the timepiece and balance mounted on a shaped foliate scroll engraved cartouche plate, winding arbor below the dial at 5 o'clock, the dial and balance visible through glazed apertures on the hinged covering panel Accompanied by a fitted leather box. “The playthings of Kings,” is how distinguished horological author Alfred Chapuis described late 18th century singing bird automatons in his 1958 benchmark book Automata. Chapuis writes, “only for the princely clients of   former days could such richly produced objets d’arts be made for the decoration of the boxes was in the same class as the mechanism.“ In writing this passage, Chapuis could have easily been referring to the present singing bird scent bottle. It is clear that Chapuis carefully chose the finest examples for his book. In post-war Switzerland, Chapuis, already a prolific author on the subject of horology, had garnered tremendous respect and had entrée into the finest collections in Europe, such as those belonging to Gustave Loup, Maurice Sandoz and Sir David Salomons. Most unusually for an object of this date, the early history of this scent bottle has been recorded. On February 16th, 1787, Jean-Frederic Leschot (1746-1824) sent from Geneva to James Cox in London two identical scent flacons, each with serinette, singing bird and watch. The bottles had been ordered by James Cox in London and were described and listed in the account ledger as No. 1-2 scent flacons enameled in blue with applied rings and flowers in pearls and rubies with sapphires, watch with the balance set with diamonds, a serinette with bird placed on a tree trunk (in a medallion), which moves its beak and tail. The cost for the two pieces was listed as £235.18 (pounds sterling). The Jaquet-Droz and Leschot account books record a second similarly-designed set of scent bottles sold to James Cox in London for £226.8 (pounds sterling). The second set also described with serinettes, singing birds and watches were sent on April 26th and 27th of the same year; however, unlike the first two bottles, they were recorded as a pair. For an illustration of this pair see: Simon Harcourt-Smith, A catalogue of various clocks, watches, automata, and other miscellaneous objects of European workmanship dating from the XVIIIth and the early XIXth centuries, in the Palace Museum and the Wu Ying Tien, Peiping, 1933, W.Y.T No.653, p.6, pl. II. A fifth scent bottle of slightly different shape and designed with the singing bird in a covered compartment, is in the L.A. Mayer Collection in Jerusalem, formerly the Sir David Salomons Collection. This fifth bottle, of slightly later date, carries the innovation which Leschot writes about to Duval in London in 1792: "Two pairs of mechanism for bottles with a watch, the same as those sent to you recently. I hope to succeed in adding something different, whereby the medallion, which in the previous ones remained open after the bird's song, will close itself." The letter mentioned above is part of a large body of Leschot's correspondence preserved today. Through these letters, much insight into his business and its practices has been gained; the letters cover a range of topics from the difficulties Leschot suffered with certain personalities he encountered, to his fear of trade secrets being shared with the wrong parties. Bernard Pin, author of Watches & Automata, The Maurice Sandoz Collection, writes about the decorative elegance of the present bottle: "we should venture to say that the ingenuity with which the singing bird's mechanism has been integrated is also worthy of praise. For in this piece, the song is obtained by the use of a tiny bird organ." The organ would gradually be replaced by a system of whistle and sliding piston, less visually interesting but more compact. Historians acknowledge that Jaquet-Droz & Leschot, along with Jacob Frisard were the earliest makers to develop singing birds in small formatted objects such as scent bottles, watches, and snuff  boxes see: Alfred Chapuis, Automata, pp. 194-195. The birds were fashioned to imitate the live canary, which had become popular in 18th century European society. The canary, beloved for its melodic sounds, became an obsession to train the canaries to sing. In this process, the serinette was a useful tool. Canaries were introduced by the Spanish (who conquered the Canary Islands in the late 15th century) to Europe. Canaries were so enthusiastically bred that 29 distinct varieties existed by the beginning of the 18th century. The process of education was described by Professor Hervieux de Chanteloup, author of the 18th century book "New Treatise of Canary Birds," and an authority on training Canaries in the 1740s. He stated, “As to the manner of proceeding, at each lesson one must repeat nine or ten times the tunes one wants to teach them; & those tunes must be played without repeating the beginning twice." See: Sharon Bailly and Christian Bailly's, Flights of Fancy, p. 42. For a full discussion on the Canary and its popularity, see Ibid, pp. 32-53. As mentioned earlier, a large body of Leschot’s correspondence is preserved. The scent bottles are referred to in various letters from 1791 to 1793, after the passing of both father and son Jaquet-Droz. Now with the firm under the control of Jean-Frédéric Leschot, Leschot writes to MM. Duval of London in 1792, "These various pieces with mechanical birds embodied many trade secrets." See: Alfred Chapuis, Automata, p. 200. Chapuis quotes from a letter dated 2nd November 1793 from Jean Frédéric Leschot to his associate Henri Maillardet in London, "My friend M. Frisard like myself thoroughly agrees with you that the smallest number of people possible should be told how these things work, apart from relatives who are close by one in the workshop and whom we can trust not to turn their   knowledge to our disadvantage." In another letter, dated February 1793, Leschot informs Louis George in Berlin: "As for the singing bird snuffbox which you have seen, this mechanical piece certainly comes from our workshop. I had the honor to inform you a few years ago that we do this sort of work putting a  mechanical bird into a jeweled object such as a snuff box or scent bottle." For further references to these singing bird flasks by this maker, see Alfred Chapuis and Edouard Gelis, Le Monde Des Automates, pp. 120-121, fig. 397, vol. II, 1928; the same piece illustrated in color, The Art of Time, The Sir David Salomons Collection of Watches and Clocks, LA. Mayer Museum, Jerusalem, pp. 68-69, 2009; Guo Fu Xiang & Guan Xue Ling, ‘Les collections de Jaquet-Droz au Musée de la Cité Interdite’, in the exhibition catalogue, Automates & Merveilles, Musée Internationale d’Horlogerie, La Chaux-de-Fonds, 2012, pp. 46-47; Osvaldo Patrizzi, "Arts of Asia," March-April 1980, "The Watch Market in China," p.71. The Case The case is stamped with the mark PG crowned, probably that of the workshop of Philippe Gervais (1734-1796), bijoutier, son of André, who came from Hanau in Germany, to Geneva and was registered as a resident on 7 September 1761. Two years later he was received as a master under the usual restrictions imposed on foreigners and presented as his masterpiece ‘a most acceptable gold and enamel snuff box set with diamonds.' On 26 February 1764, he married a local woman, Gabrielle Rey, with whom he had three children. Gervais died in Geneva on 19 August 1796. (Archives d’Etat, Geneva, Registres du conseil, RC 262, p. 402; Elections des jurés et réception à la maîtrise, p. 79, no. 676). The mark PG crowned incuse is usually found on objects of vertu combined with watches, such as a diamond-set, two-color gold and enamel chatelaine (Sotheby’s Olympia, 24 October 2002, lot 140) and colored gold snuff boxes set with watches (Sotheby’s Geneva, 15 May 1996; Christie’s Geneva, 15 May 1990, lot 81 and 14 May 1991, lot 1). For another elaborately executed scent bottle by this maker, see Terence Camerer Cuss, The Sandberg Watch Collection, pp. 386-387. Jacob Frisard, an inventive and innovative mechanical genius, is credited with many of the advances which brought Swiss automata and singing bird boxes to their apex at the beginning of the 19th century. Jacob, son of Louis Frisard and his wife, Marie-Madelaine Bourquin, was born in January 1753, in the village of Villeret, near Berne, in the Swiss Jura. Following family tradition, he served his apprenticeship as a clockmaker in La Chaux-de-Fonds. According to Sharon Bailly, [Flights of Fancy, Geneva, 2001] he then worked for clockmakers in Turin for around 12 years from 1772, marrying there Catherine Vastapani in 1778. The couple were to produce at least 14 children and concern for his numerous progeny seems to have influenced many of Frisard's work decisions, leading him to flee Geneva for Bienne in 1792, under threat of the French invasion of Savoy. Earlier, the couple had moved to Carouge, outside the city of Geneva, around 1784. Frisard was making watches at this time as well as working closely on mechanical inventions with Jaquet-Droz and their associate Frédéric Leschot. The Frisard family apparently did not return to Geneva until the turn of the century and it is from the surviving letters Leschot wrote to Frisard during the Bienne years that much of the information we have about Jacob's working life, skills and character has been gleaned. There is no doubt that he was a mécanicien of utmost ability and he has been credited with inventing the mechanism that enabled the lids of singing bird boxes to close smoothly after the bird itself has slipped back into its nest. He himself felt that his talents had been somewhat over-shadowed by the fame of the Jaquet-Droz and Leschot name, endeavoring in later years to promote his own more elaborate creations by travelling in the way that they had done. Indeed, it was on the return from a visit to Constantinople that Frisard died in a small town in Bulgaria in 1810. James Cox was the leading eighteenth-century retailer of jeweled automata and ‘toys’, and as such, his name has become indelibly linked with these objects. Born in London in about 1723, he was apprenticed in 1738 to Humphrey Pugh of Fleet Street, a silver spinner in business as a toyman.  Thus, although Cox was described as a goldsmith when he became free of the London Goldsmiths’ Company in 1745 and years later registered a mark as such, any skills as a craftsman were always secondary to his inventiveness and marketing abilities. His career was tumultuous. After an inauspicious start followed by an early bankruptcy, he began anew on a grander scale, focusing his attention on exporting his increasingly fanciful objects to the Far East, where they were called ‘sing-songs.’ When the inherently risky Chinese market waned, he opened a museum in Spring Gardens to display his wares, famously dispersed by lottery in 1775. Although the lottery was profitable, and despite significant sales to Catherine the Great, Cox declared bankruptcy again in 1778. He continued trading as a jeweler until he retired and moved to Watford in 1795.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-06-11
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A magnificent yellow gold, silver, multi-colored agate, diamond, ruby

• Swiss B21, quartz movement • mother-of-pearl dial with applied sapphire numerals, diamond-set centerfield, gold and diamond pierced decorated hands, brilliant-cut diamond-set bezel • all housed within a circular yellow gold case, mounted onto a realistically sculptured yellow gold tree with bark-textured finish, the tree itself set within a very substantial piece of natural calcite and fluor, realistically sculptured roots and branches swathed to the base with bark-textured finish, blue, yellow and pink agate flowers blooming in abundance through the green agate foliage, each flower set with diamonds and rubies, bull rushes depicting as black onyx with green agate foliage, ruby-set stamens, amethyst petals with satin-finish green agate foliage, ruby-set stamens, the upper part of the tree with a highly realistic sculptured yellow gold bird's nest, itself containing yellow gold and diamond-set treasures, including a pair of scissors, spectacles, thimble, ruby-set ring and enamel-capped safety pin, all collected by a realistically modeled two color gold Magpie, swooping onto a branch and holding a very large oval-shaped tanzanite from its beak, the upper branches with rose quartz flowers with diamond and ruby-set stamens, with green agate leaves • inner casing, dial and movement signed and stamped PPC and hallmarked, base signed Patek Philippe, Geneva     With a Patek Philippe Extract from the Archives confirming production in 1992 and sale on January 4th, 1996.  The Extract additionally states that the clock has diamonds weighing 24.95 carats, sapphires weighing 6.02 carats, rubies weighing 13.17 carats and one massive oval tanzanite weighing an incredible 104.75 carats.  Total weight of the clock is 15.1 kg.  With an associated wooden travelling box

  • HKGHongkong (S.A.R. Kina)
  • 2013-04-07
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Breguet, No. 2807, sold to General Yermoloff on August 26, 1817 for 4,000 Francs

Breguet, No. 2807, sold to General Yermoloff on August 26, 1817 for 4,000 Francs. Extremely rare and exceptionally fine and elegant 18K gold and enamel astronomical equation of time watch with annual calendar, manual perpetual calendar, phases of the moon and mean and true solar time, in a Morocco fitted box. Accompanied by Breguet Certificate of 1857. C. Four-body, "forme quatre baguettes", back centered with engraved with coat-of-arms under pale gray translucent enamel, engine-turned around and on the band and bezel, gold hinged cuvette with winding, regulating and leap-year apertures. D. Silver, by Tavernier, engine-turned, to the left true solar time sub-dial with Breguet numerals, outer minute track and gold Breguet hands, symmetrically to the right mean time sub-dial with Roman numerals, outer minute track and blued steel Breguet hands, phases of the moon aperture above 6 o’clock surmounted with days of the week aperture with its setting aperture to the left, outermost annual date track. M. 53 mm. (23’’’), gilt brass, going barrel, 21 jewels, straight line calibrated lever escapement with divided lift and straight pallets, banking against the escape wheel arbor, draw, cut bimetallic steel/platinum compensation balance with rims cut in the center, sunk at the center for the double roller, gold and platinum screws, blued steel Breguet balance spring, the annual calendar driven from the gold days of the week wheel, making one revolution in five weeks, equation cam set at the center of the annual wheel, ingenious system of transmitting power from the mean time motion work to the solar time motion work via special double wheel/double rack and pinion mechanism. Signed on the dial and cuvette. Diam. 60 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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As a mysterious clock, “L’Esprit des Cabinotiers” sums up all that the Manufacture has offered over a quar-ter of a millennium, and indeed continues t

As a mysterious clock, “L’Esprit des Cabinotiers” sums up all that the Manufacture has offered over a quar-ter of a millennium, and indeed continues to offer at the most demanding and most accomplished level of haute horlogerie and artistic craftsmanship. Its name, referring to the Geneva watchmaker-craftsmen who used to work under the rooftops, eloquently embodies an approach focused on the tireless quest for tech-nical and aesthetic perfection, inextricably entwined with the brand’s geographical and historical origins. This exceptionally majestic object asserts its powerful presence in harmony with the traditions of 18th century timepieces made in extremely limited editions, table clocks driven by highly sophisticated mechanisms and clothed in an aura of supreme refinement. Spring Mechanism This masterpiece consists of a golden sphere engraved by hand according to the sky chart drawn by Robert deVaugondy (1723-1786), geographer to Louis XV and creator of two large globes, one celestial and the other ter-restrial.The sphere is composed of eight petals symbolizing the lotus flower, which may be progressively openedby means of an extremely sophisticated spring mechanism. The keys to the mystery and its revelation are knownexclusively to the owner of the object. The flower delicately reveals its heart, a timepiece endowed with a widerange of functions and complications. This complex mechanism captures the essence and thedensity of time. Celestial Sphere Mechanism When set into motion, the pink gold sphere opens up like a lotus flower, a symbol of harmony, and unfolds itseight petals, while a central telescopic cylinder raises the timepiece nestling at its heart. With its sixteen smallconnecting rods, tiny sapphire balls and articulations, this original mechanism is entirely in keeping with thenoblest watchmaking traditions, as well as with the equally time-honored art of automata. It is therefore hardlysurprising that it was crafted by a master of this extremely rare speciality.The overall effect is dynamic, ethereal, mysterious and poetic, while the cabinet of the timepiece rests firmly onthree solid gold feet. The transparency of the glare-proofed sapphire crystal provides ideal visual access, fromthe front as well as from the back, to the watchmakers’ work magnified by the masters of decoration. The goldand steel structure discreetly houses the function correctors, while two tiny holes drilled through the sapphireshell on the back of the clock serve to wind the mechanism by means of a key concealed within the base.Attention is thus naturally focused on the hand-guilloché gold dial embellished with the same motif as the other250th anniversary creations, but featuring an extremely large diameter. The center is graced with gold hour andminute hands as well as a slender deadbeat seconds hand. Compared with the classic sweep seconds hand, thedeadbeat seconds hand jumps once per second.A small central subdial displays a second time-zone, topped by four horizontal apertures showing the perpetualcalendar indications – day of the week, date, month and leap years. In terms of such sovereign complications,“L’Esprit des Cabinotiers” offers automatic hour and quarter striking and the repeating function on request. The8-day power reserve appears in a counter at noon.The lower part of the dial is occupied at 8 by the equation of time, meaning the running indication of the dif-ferencebetween mean time and true time, which fluctuates throughout the year. The moon phase, with its hand-engraved18 carat gold disc, is positioned at 6 against a starlit sky in lapis lazuli. The hand of the thermometerlocated at 4 is in blued steel, as indeed are those on the other counters.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2005-04-03
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Piguet & Meylan, Genève, the enamel attributable to Jean Abraham Lissignol, Geneva, the case attributable to Jean-Georges Rémond, Geneva, made for the

Piguet & Meylan, Genève, the enamel attributable to Jean Abraham Lissignol, Geneva, the case attributable to Jean-Georges Rémond, Geneva, made for the Chinese Market, circa 1820.Le CœurA highly important gold, enamel, pearl and turquoise-set, heart-shaped, quarter repeating musical automaton, centre-seconds, watch, in original silver fitted protecting case. C. Two-body, massive hinged at the top, the covers entirely pavé with double rows of decreasing split-pearls alternating with blue champlevé enamelled lines; the back centred with an exceptionally fine enamelled allegorical representation of Venus and Cupid, painted by Lissignol. Pearl-set bezel and intertwined turquoise set arrows. The front face decorated en suite and centred with the dial. The back panel opening and decorated inside on the edge with eau-de-nile enamel, the plate surroundinghe movement engraved with ribbon flowers enamelled in green and red flinqué colours against a pale blue champlevé ground. The enamel panel of the automaton scene finely painted with a lake-side landscape, applied with a varicoloured gold scene depicting a maiden playing a lute and a young man playing a harmonica, a windmill turning in the background. D. White enamel, with Roman numerals, outer minute and seconds ring. Blued-steel "scotties" hands with counter-poised centre-seconds. M. Gilt brasswith free standing barrel, cylinder escapement with plain three-arm balance and blued-steel flat balance spring. Pinned disc musical musical train with 20 individual tuned teeth, playing at the hour or at will, the Music/Silent lever in the edge. Repeating on two gong by depressing the pendant.Dim. 95 x 65 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1999-11-13
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AN EXCEPTIONAL AND VERY RARE GOLD PERPETUAL CALENDAR CHRONOGRAPH WRISTWATCH

18k, damascened nickel lever movement, 23 jewels, mono-metallic compensation balance, 8 adjustments, precision regulator, silvered dial, applied arabic and dot numerals, three subsidiary dials for constant seconds, 30-minute register, date combined with aperture for moon phases, apertures for day and month, outer tachometer scale, luminous hands, circular case with scooped bezel, down-turned stepped lugs with satin finished sides, rectangular satin finished flat pushers with polished sides, snap-off satin finished case back with dated monogram, case, dial and movement signed, the inside case back additionally with Asprey hallmark, accompanied by an Extract from the Archives and an 18k Patek buckle.  EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVES The accompanying Extract from the Patek Philippe Archives confirms that this wristwatch was manufactured in 1952 and sold on May 18th, 1956. PROVENANCE The Asprey 2499 was sold by the original owner in the late 1990s after which time it was purchased by a distinguished collector. It is now offered at auction for the first time. Reference 2499 was manufactured between 1950 and 1985. During the 35 years of production, just 349 pieces were made, equating to an average of 9 examples a year. The first series is by far the rarest and research shows that there may have been no more than 40 pieces made in yellow gold. With its crisp flat rectangular pushers, the first series 2499 is immediately distinguishable from all later series, each of which has round chronograph pushers. Currently the only known example of a reference 2499 with the Asprey signature,  Patek Philippe no.868.346 may well be unique. The 2499 is recognised as one of the most important perpetual calendar chronograph wristwatches made by Patek Philippe. When it was launched in 1950, Patek Philippe was still the only watchmaker to manufacture such a complication. As testament to the reference 2499’s classic styling, reflections of the first series 2499 can be seen in the recently launched ref.5970 which echoes its forebear in both design and appearance, especially with its rectangular pushers and tachometer dial. Asprey, Britain's world famous luxury lifestyle house, was founded 225 years ago in 1781. Over its history, the company has courted glamorous and famous clientele from around the world. Asprey received Royal Warrants from both Queen Victoria and King Edward VII. Indeed, at the time of the latter's funeral, it was noted that almost all the Heads of State attended and "many of them came to Asprey, you might have seen three or four of them at once." In the 20th century, the Asprey business grew tremendously and commissions were received from millionaires such as J. Pierpont Morgan and potentates such as the Maharajah of Patiala. Today the company has stores in London, New York, Beverly Hills, Honolulu, Tokyo, Osaka, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, St Moritz and Dubai. Making its first ever appearance at auction, the ‘Asprey’ 2499 is certainly one of the rarest and most significant examples of the reference ever to be offered for sale. The first series 2499 was some 2mm larger in diameter than the reference 1518 that it was introduced to replace. With rounded sides and finely stepped down-turned lugs, the 2499 first series is substantial in size with its 'bassine' case. It is interesting to note the attention to detail on the case finish which is wonderfully preserved on the present lot. The sides of the lugs are satin finished as is the case back and the top and base of the rectangular chronograph pushers; this provides an excellent contrast with the polished case sides, bezel and edges of the pushers. As the only known example of a reference 2499 retailed by Asprey, several features distinctive to this wristwatch can be noted. First and most clearly one can see the Asprey script signature which perfectly fills the date subsidiary. As well as the Patek Philippe signature and numbering, the inside of the case back is additionally stamped with the Asprey signature. The inside case back also features, as one would expect for an English retailed gold watch, the UK import hallmarks, in this instance for London  in 1955. Together with the Extract from the Archives, it can therefore be deduced that the watch was shipped to Asprey, London in 1955 (when it was hallmarked) and sold by Asprey a year later on May 18th, 1956. The initials to the case back are dated 25th May 1956 so the watch may well have been purchased for an anniversary or birthday present.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-11-14
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An extremely rare, beautiful and historically important white gold

Patek Philippe Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed A truly landmark model, reference 2497 is the first serially produced Patek Philippe perpetual calendar wristwatch to feature centre seconds. First introduced in 1951, it is considered one of manufacture’s most beautiful designs ever made, eliciting pure joy and admiration from its beholder. The elegant curved case, produced first by Vichet and then Wenger, hugs the wrist perfectly. The watch’s overall symmetry is furthermore mesmerizing to the eye, enhanced by its robust presence on the wrist.Reference 2497 is one of Patek Philippe’s rarest serially produced perpetual calendar models. Research shows that a combined 179 examples of reference 2497 and its water resistant sibling 2438/1 were produced during their 12 year production period. Whilst yellow gold and pink gold examples are rare, even superlative specimens, those cased in white gold enter “unheard of” territory. In fact, no more than merely three examples cased in white gold have graced the market so far, including the present watch.The 1940s and 1950s were the golden years for Patek Philippe's perpetual calendar wristwatches. During this period, yellow gold watches were de rigueur among gentlemen. White metal watches, on the other hand, were considered completely audacious and daring. This sentiment is even more pertinent when one considers that no more than ten Patek Philippe perpetual calendar complication wristwatches were cased in white metal during the 1940s and 1950s.To date, we know of one reference 1526 in steel, four 1518s in steel, two 2497s in platinum, and finally, three 2497s in white gold. It was not until the introduction of reference 3448 that Patek Philippe produced white metal perpetual calendars on a "regular" basis. Even then, production was scarce. As such, this watch is, without a doubt amongst the most monumental timepieces to grace the market thus far. It staunchly holds its place in any discussion of historically important masterpieces, such as the blockbuster Patek Philippe steel reference 1518 or, later, platinum reference 2499.Today, the market has identified three white gold reference 2497s, including the present watch. One example, bearing case number 680'004 and movement number 888'055 is on consecutive number away from the present watch. The second known example carries case number 679'800 and movement number 888'015.This wristwatch is among the very earliest examples of reference 2497 produced. The dials of first series reference 2497s, as seen on this watch, were fitted with Arabic and dot raised hour markers. Later models would feature faceted, baton hour markers. The present watch was first consigned at auction in 2001 by its original owner and appeared on the market again in 2005. Since then, it has resided in the same prestigious collection, only to surface again, twelve years later. Three owner watches are an absolute rarity. The sparse ownership of this watch only underlies its importance and desirability.Featuring a stunning silvered opaline finish, this dial is preserved in astounding condition. The enamel is thick and raised, with a strong accent above the “e” in Genève. It is free of visible tarnishing and spotting, attesting to the care and love it has received throughout its lifespan. The case is of stunning quality. Produced by Wenger, it is distinguished by its rounded caseback, short lugs and larger case diameter. The caseback is furthermore stamped with its case maker’s mark, a “1” inside a hammer. Beneath two of the lugs are deep and crisp hallmarks. There is very pronounced fluting to the lugs. One striking feature of the present watch is its captivating original Patek Philippe white gold bracelet produced by Gay Frères, which is flexible and designed with a “Florentine” finish. It is a dream come true for any collector, as it not only provides great flair, but is also confirmed by the Patek Philippe Extract from the Archives. In addition, the bracelet features a small detail that may not strike a casual observer. On the upper left side of the bottom bracelet is a small groove, which is also repeated on the top the bracelet. This is no flaw. Instead, this feature was intentionally done by Patek Philippe to allow the wearer to easily access the correctors without having to remove the bracelet – a sign of both the firm's eye for detail and the bracelet’s originality to the watch.Another nice touch is the plexi crystal, which has a loupe to magnify the day and date. These plexis can only be found on vintage Patek Philippe wristwatches. They incredibly rare and exceedingly hard to find today. There are watches that represent the apex of collecting. We are proud to offer one such timepiece - a reminder, testament even, of the grace and beauty of Patek Philippe's designs and a bygone era of watchmaking.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2017-11-12
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Breguet, No. 1188, sold to Don Anto-nio of Spain on August 1, 1808 for 3600 Francs

Breguet, No. 1188, sold to Don Anto-nio of Spain on August 1, 1808 for 3600 Francs. Exceptionally fine and extremely rare 18K gold Garde Temps four minute free-sprung tourbillon regulator with 36-hour power reserve indicator, subsidiary seconds and stop seconds, escapement naturel with fast train, and Turkish dial, in its Morocco fitted box, accompanied by 1927 Certificate. C. Four-body, massive, concealed hinges, back cover with sunburst engine-turned center on Barley corn engine-turned back-ground, engine-turned bezels, gold hinged cuvette. D. White, enamel, Islamic hour chapter ring in the center, outer minute track with 15-minute Islamic markers, up-and-down sector at 6 o’clock, subsidiary seconds at 10 o’clock, stop-seconds at 2 o’clock. M. 53.5 mm. (24’’’), gilt half-plate, reversed fusee and chain with maintaining-power, 24 ruby and sapphire jewels, four minute tourbillon regulator with escapement naturel, steel escape wheels, the 12-tooth driving one with oil retention slots, double 3-tooth driven wheel (one for locking, the other for impulse), very special detent with triangular locking jewel on spring-loaded lever, 3-arm cut compensation balance of steel/copper-silver alloy, gold temperature screws, platinum meantime screws, blued steel Breguet balance spring mounted in adjustable stud, fast beat train beating 21,600 beats per hour, both second hand wheels are driven from the carriage wheel, one of them is friction set and consequently can be stopped by pressing the pull-and-twist piston in the pendant. Signed on dial, case and movement, dial also with secret signature. Diam. 66 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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Annons

PATEK PHILIPPE, THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED EXCEPTIONAL FULL 24-HOUR REPEATING, QUARTER AND SPECIAL-TYPE FIVE-MINUTE REPEATING 24-HOURS IN ONE REVOLUTION

PATEK PHILIPPE, THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED EXCEPTIONAL FULL 24-HOUR REPEATING, QUARTER AND SPECIAL-TYPE FIVE-MINUTE REPEATING 24-HOURS IN ONE REVOLUTION POCKET WATCH Patek Philippe & Cie, Genève, movement No. 97443, case No. 212850. Sold to Monsieur E. E. Hoesch, Villa Barbaia, Mergellina, Naples, on November 27, 1894 for 3750 Swiss Francs. Exceptional, highly important and almost certainly unique, large, full 24-hour, quarter and special-type five-minute repeating, 18K pink gold, keyless pocket watch with perpetual calendar, chronograph, moon phases, lunar calendar and 24-hour dial for 24-hours in one revolution. Accompanied by the original Certificate of Origin and Patek Philippe sales receipt. C. Four-body, bassine, polished, fi ve-bar hinges, bolt at 23 for locking the chronograph, co-axial button in the crown for the start/stop and return-to-zero of the chronograph. Hinged gold cuvette with setting nibs for the calendar and moon phases on the edge. D. White enamel with radial 24-hour dauphine numerals, red 24, outer minutes track and concentric chronograph divisions with outermost fi ve-second numerals, 15, 30, 45 and 60 in red, subsidiary dials for the date in red concentric with seconds, the days of the week and the months, aperture for the moon phases with lunar calendar on the periphery. Blued steel spade hour and minute hands, gold calendar hands. M. 22’’’, rhodium plated, fausses cotes decoration, 35 jewels, wolf’s tooth winding, counterpoised and calibrated straightline lever escapement, cut bimetallic compensation balance with meantime and temperature adjustment screws, blued steel Breguet balance spring with terminal curve, swan-neck micrometer regulator, repeating on gongs activated by a slide on the band. Case, cuvette and movement signed. Diam. 60 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2011-11-13
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Mahatma Gandhi’s Pocketwatch Formely owned by Mahatma Gandhi, political and spiritual leader of India, later given to his grandniece, Abha Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi’s Pocketwatch Formely owned by Mahatma Gandhi, political and spiritual leader of India, later given to his grandniece, Abha Gandhi. Accompanied by Gandhi’s sandals, bowl, plate, glasses, images of Gandhi and letters of authenticity from Ghita Mehta, Talatsahid Khan Babi, and Professor Lester Kurtz. The watch: Zenith, movement No. 421357, case No. 49529. Made circa 1910. Fine, rare and Historically Important, sterling silver keyless pocket watch with alarm function. C. Three body, "bassine", hinged engine-turned case back, hinged silver cuvette. D. White enamel with luminous Arabic numerals, outer minute track, subsidiary sunk dials for the seconds at 6 and the alarm at 12. Blued steel skeleton hands. M. Cal. 21"', gilt brass, 15 jewels, straight-line lever escapement, cut bimetallic compensation balance, blued steel Breguet balance spring, index regulator. Dial and movement signed, numbered on the case. Diam. 49 mm. Thickness 16 mm. The Sandals: Gandhi apparently gave the sandals to a British military officer in Aden in 1931 during his trip from Bombay to London. The officer took photographs of Gandhi in Aden prior to the Roundtable talks regarding Indian Independence. In exchange, it is believed that Gandhi gave the officer his sandals. The Bowl/plate (thali): The bowl and the plate (thali) were also gifts that Gandhi bestowed upon Abha, his grandniece. They are accompanied by letters of authenticity from Ghita Mehta, Abha's daughter who inherited them upon Abha’s death. She writes that both the bowl and the thali were used by Gandhi and given to her mother as gifts in the 1940s. The Glasses: This pair of glasses having belonged to Gandhi are thought to have been given to Colonel H. H. Shiri Diwan Nawab, Sir Muhammed Mahabat Khanji, the 3rd Rasul Khanji, Nawab Sahib of Junagadh, by Gandhi, most probably at his Ashram in Ahmedabad in the 1930s. It is said that when Mahabat asked Gandhi for inspiration, Gandhi handed over his glasses saying they were the “eyes” that had given him vision to free India. The glasses are accompanied by a letter of authenticity from the Colonel’s great grandson, Talatsahid Khan Babi and another from Dr. Lester Kurtz.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2009-03-05
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The Pilgrim

Marlene Dumas oil on canvas Painted in 2006. The Uncertainty of PortraitureDominic van den Boogerd Dominic van den Boogerd is an art critic. The former chief editor of Metropolis M, he is the current Director of De Ateliers in Amsterdam. Among many publications, he co-authored the Phaidon monograph on Marlene Dumas.The Pilgrim, 2006, is a tantalizing work by South African artist Marlene Dumas, one of the most prominent figurative painters working today. The painting was exhibited for the first time in the exhibition Man Kind at Galerie Paul Andriesse in Amsterdam in 2006, the same gallery where Dumas exhibited her very first series of portrait paintings The Eyes of the Night Creatures some 21 years earlier. As the optimistic days of The Family of Man – Edward Steichen’s 1955 exhibition celebrating global solidarity – drew to a close in the wake of 9/11, Man Kind was Dumas’ tribute to those who had influenced her work: the portraits of politicians, martyrs and murderers in the mass media. All part of the same kind. And as we know, man is not so kind.The present work depicts a close up of a bearded man, absent-mindedly staring into nothingness. Alone with his thoughts, he is difficult to read and an elusive character. The overall, brooding atmosphere is one of silence. Pink twilight softly glows on the man’s face, the lush and vivid rose, orange and green brushstrokes on his forehead, nose and cheek standing in stark contrast to the bleak and greyish parts of his skin and the darkness surrounding him.The Pilgrim was not only shown in Dumas’ acclaimed retrospective exhibition that travelled from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, to the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Menil Collection, Houston, in 2008 and 2009, it was also included in the extraordinary exhibition Tronies - Marlene Dumas and the Old Masters at Haus der Kunst, Munich, in 2010-2011. Exploring the art historical trope of the ‘tronie’ – a depiction of a face which is not necessarily a portrait but presents a stock character or exaggerated features – this exhibition presented select paintings by Dumas next to works by Rembrandt, van Dyck, Judith Leyster and other 17th century masters. Pondering the notion of the tronie in relation to her first series of portrait paintings in the accompanying catalogue, Dumas recalled, ‘when I painted my faces in 1985 – The Eyes of the Night Creatures – I knew the works looked like portraits, and the works were portraits to some extent; and yet they were not true portraits either’ (Marlene Dumas, quoted in TRONIES - Marlene Dumas und die Alten Meister / and the Old Masters, exh. cat., Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2010, p. 94).Is The Pilgrim a portrait in the literal sense of the word? And if so, of whom? The title indicates no particular individual, but rather a type of person. Other paintings in these series have similar names, such as The Semite, 2006, or The Believer, 2005. Pilgrims undertake a journey, a pilgrimage to a holy place to find spiritual enlightenment or healing. They are believers, who, devoted to their faith, are prepared to endure physical misery for God’s sake. There are all sorts of pilgrims: Catholics who travel the road of Saint James to Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, Spain; Muslims who confirm their faith with the Hajj, the pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia.The Pilgrim may be compared to The Neighbour, 2005 (Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam), which Dumas painted around the same time and in the same format as part of the Man Kind series. The picture depicts an ordinary young man, likely of North-African descent, with a short flaxen beard. He could be the guy next door. Indeed, ever since the migration of so-called ‘guest workers’ to the Netherlands in the 1960s and 1970s, a large community of people from Moroccan descent reside in Amsterdam, particularly in the area where Dumas, an immigrant herself, lives and works. The neighbour in Dumas’ painting has been identified as Mohammed Bouakhri. Known in the press as ‘Mohammed B.’, he was arrested and convicted in 2004 for the murder of Dutch filmmaker and journalist Theo van Gogh (who, coincidentally, descended from Vincent van Gogh’s family). Theo van Gogh was murdered in Amsterdam on a Tuesday morning and was left with a written statement pierced onto his chest. Giving the appearance that the murder had been motivated by fundamentalist religious beliefs, the brutal assassination caused great social turmoil within the Netherlands – heightening feelings of fear, xenophobia and Islamophobic sentiments. Considering the person depicted by Dumas in The Neighbour, nothing in his gentle and calm expression indicates that we are standing face to face with a terrorist. The picture counters the subliminal suspicion that every bearded man of North-African descent is a potential terrorist, a notion widely spread by the media at the time. When The Pilgrim was exhibited together with The Neighbour at Galerie Paul Andriesse, it was notably not shown in the exhibition space itself, but in the gallery office. Perhaps the picture was thought to be too controversial. Looking at this anonymous pilgrim, one is easily tempted to recognize in his face the features of Osama bin Laden, the world’s most wanted terrorist back in 2006. By then, Osama bin Laden was already in hiding for years. While there were not many pictures of him in circulation, the few images that were available were ubiquitous. In her image archive, Dumas held a photograph that depicted two indigenous people from the inlands of New Guinea wearing T-shirts with a print of Osama bin Laden’s face on it. The photograph of Osama bin Laden that Dumas has appropriated as the source material for The Pilgrim is well known, as it was, and still is, published around the world. In this image, the enemy of the state looks rather handsome and attractive – unlike Charles Manson, with his bewildered and furious gaze; unlike Adolf Hitler, with his moustache. Dressed in white, Osama bin Laden has the charisma of a Jesus-figure (though nobody knows what Jesus looked like in reality, his image has been constructed from countless imaginations across the centuries). Frozen in time in this particular portrait, bin Laden remains 33 years of age forever. Sometimes a portrait becomes the icon for the spirit of an era – epitomized best by Che Guevara’s black and white portrait that summarizes the revolutionary spirit of the 1960s. As Dumas ironically observed, ‘now radical Islam too got its representative face, be it against all Islamic laws’ (Marlene Dumas, quoted in ‘De keuze van Marlene Dumas’, exh. leaflet, Beeld van de 21ste Eeuw, MOTI Museum of the Image, Breda, 2012-2013).While Jesus became the Christian icon of all-encompassing Love, the face of bin Laden has become the prime expression of Hate. In her paintings and drawings, Dumas rarely addresses such volatile subject matter directly, instead surrounding her subjects with a veil of ambiguity. In her oeuvre, you won’t find paintings directly based on notorious photographs from Ground Zero, Abu Ghraib or Guantánamo Bay. As Dumas wrote in a statement for the exhibition catalogue for the Man Kind exhibition at Galerie Paul Andriesse:'We travel in disguise,so how would you knowfriend from foe?The devil is back, as two-facedand as polarizing as ever.Who’s side you are ondepends on where you’re from.'Yes, The Pilgrim might represent Sheikh Osama bin Mohammed bin Awad bin Laden, founder of Al Qaida, hero of the Afghan War against the Russians, mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks. And then again, it might not. A smaller portrait painted by Dumas in 2010, which now resides in the collection of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, is entitled Osama, leaving no doubt about the identity of the sitter. While the initials of ‘OBL’ on the reverse of The Pilgrim serve as a quiet nod to the potential connection to the sitter, Dumas nevertheless leaves room for doubt by addressing the issue of likeness – a notion of course central to the art of portraiture, but also to all areas where identification of a person is cardinal. It speaks volumes that one of the portraits in the Man Kind series is called The Look-alike, 2005. Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussain employed a lookalike for safety reasons – an amazing double, only recognizable by his left ear. Saddam is one of the four persons portrayed by Dumas in a series of small drawings, entitled The Politics of Recognition, 1993, the other three being Adolf Hitler, Martin Heidegger and ‘a murderer’ – which is, in fact, a drawing after a painting by Jean-Louis Theodore Géricault. We can never be sure of whom we are really looking at. In the impressive oeuvre of Marlene Dumas, The Pilgrim addresses the uncertainty of portraiture like no other work.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2018-03-08
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“Tour de I’lle Antiquorum” Vacheron Constantin, Genève, “Tour de I’lle”, Pièce Unique. Made to mark the occasion of the Quarter Millennium of Vacheron

“Tour de I’lle Antiquorum” Vacheron Constantin, Genève, “Tour de I’lle”, Pièce Unique. Made to mark the occasion of the Quarter Millennium of Vacheron Constantin in 2005. Exceptional and unique, astronomical and astrological, double-face, 18K pink gold (5N) gentleman’s minute repeating wristwatch with perpetual calendar and leap year, “Sirius” star chart, celestial annual calendar, visible one-minute tourbillon regulator, sunrise and sunset indication, perpetual equation of time, phases and age of the moon, 58-hour power reserve, second time zone, day-night indication, couple de sonnerie and black guilloché dials. C. three-body, round, bezels with serrated edge, rounded band, curved sloped “250 ans” lugs, anti-reflectivesapphire crystals. The front bezel revolves to activate the minute repeat.Dials:- Recto; solid gold, black, “250 ans” guilloché, applied pink gold faceted baton indexes, off-center minutetrack, subsidiary dial for the second time zone in 24 hours with day-night indication, moon phase aperturewith lunar age scale, couple de sonnerie and 58-hour power reserve sectors and aperture with seconds trackto view the revolving one-minute tourbillon. Pink gold “éventail” hands, applied pink gold Seal of Geneva.- Verso; solid gold, black, “250 ans” guilloché, subsidiary dials for the day, date and month, leap year aper-tureand equation of time sector arranged in the upper half of the dial, in the lower half the “Sirius” star chart,celestial annual calendar and sunrise and sunset sectors. Pink gold “éventail” hands.Movement: Cal. 2750, stamped with the Seal of Geneva, rhodium plated, “fausses-cotes” decoration, 834 com-ponents,38 jewels, lateral lever escapement, one-minute tourbillon regulator, the carriage in the form of the“Maltese Cross”, free-sprung monometallic balance with a frequency of 2,5Hz, (18,000A/h) shock-absorber, self-compensatingBreguet balance-spring, repeating on gongs via revolving bezel, two-position winding and settingsystem, adjustment for second time zone, moon phases, and perpetual calendar via five pushpieces in the band,adjustment for sidereal disc by the crown and a lockable pushbutton on the band at 8.Dimensions: diameter 47 mm, thickness 17.8 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2005-04-03
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Nightingale and Fledglings. FR (Frères Rochat), Geneva, No. 228, probably made for the Russian market, circa 1814

Nightingale and Fledglings. FR (Frères Rochat), Geneva, No. 228, probably made for the Russian market, circa 1814. Magnificent, highly important and probably unique gold and enamel, diamond-set miniature singing bird cage with center-seconds petite sonnerie clockwatch, the three birds singing on the hour or at will. C. Octagonal base, side panels very finely painted on enamel with lakeside scenes, watch in the front surrounded by green enamel plaque painted with garlands of flowers and red ribbons, back with bouquet of flowers, chased and engraved gold background, canted corners with azure enamel plaques applied to a chased and foliate engraved gold background, spring-loaded front panel reveals winding and setting arbors, striking/silence lever, singing/silence lever, activation lever at the left edge. The cage, following the shape of the base, supported on four sets of two Corinthian columns in rose gold with yellow gold capitals and floral bases, mesh wire screen at the base, the cage itself formed of rose gold lances. The dome stands on a gold and chased ribbon bordered with black champlevé enamel, with alternating diamonds and azure enamel segments centered by gold leaves, the eight panels of the dome formed of alternating segments of gold wire mesh with applied painted on enamel flower garlads and pierced and florally engraved gold segments separated by half-round gold wire with translucent imperial blue enamel, the base of the dome decorated with translucent red, green, and blue enamel over flinqué forming flowers, foliage and a setting sun, the gold cage floor pierced and engraved with arches and a fleur-de-lis pattern. Inside a nightingale rests on a gold bar, a gold wire mesh nest with two baby birds resting on a green enamel pedestal painted with flowers. Gold ring handle mounted in gold finial decorated with painted on enamel flowers on a pale green ground, gold neck, gold ball feet.D. White enamel, radial Roman numerals, outer minute divisions. Blued steel Breguet hands.M. Rectangular 45 x 30 mm, brass, fixed barrels, cylinder escapement, three-arm gold balance with flat balance spring, striking based on a single cam with each of the 12 hour notches divided into three for quarters, striking on two bells, hour-hammer pusher lifted after striking hours, pinion governor set in eccentric bushing for speed regulation.Singing bird movement. Octagonal, 86 x 72 mm, brass, reversed fusee and chain, rectangular bellows, six-wheel train (including fusee), 3rd wheel arbor set with eight spring-loaded cams which make 4 revolutions per song - they mostly control the singing, the extension of its arbor is fixed with a set of six cams and a pusher for the Maltese cross set on the 4th wheel and fitted with loosely revolving 4-step cam at the top which changes the position of the cams at each turn. The top cams control the movements of the birds, 2-wing governor with adjustable weights set on a worm (endless) gear.Signed and numbered on both sides of the singing-bird movement and on front plate of the watch movement.Dim. Height 271 mm, base 98 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2003-10-11
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1914, no.174.480; an important and unique double open-faced minute repeating perpetual calendar keyless lever watch with split seconds chronograph

Patek Philippe, 1914, no.174.480; an important and unique double open-faced minute repeating perpetual calendar keyless lever watch with split seconds chronograph and register, especially made for George Thompson 18k, unusual nickel lever movement, 37 jewels, guillaume balance with gold screws, 8 adjustments, blued steel Breguet over-coil balance spring, swan-neck precision regulator, backplate signed and numbered and with perpetual work visibly mounted against fausse côtes decoration, enamel moon-phase wheel highlighted with gold moon and stars, repeating on two coiled steel gongs, the front plate with côte circulaire decoration and unusually mounted with the chronograph mechanism and split seconds pincer, signed and numbered underneath bezel and additionally numbered to the edge of the movement. Time and Chronograph Dial white enamel dial, black enamel Breguet numerals, blued steel spade hands, sector for 30-minute register, outer ring calibrated for minutes/chronograph seconds, constant subsidiary seconds, blued steel split seconds hands, signed Patek Philippe & Cie, Geneva, Switzerland Perpetual Calendar Dial white enamel, three subsidiary dials for day, month and date, calibrated in red enamel, aperture for age and phases of the moon, signed George Thompson St Paul Minn. 1914. The Case 18k gold, both bezels engine turned, chronograph pusher through the crown; split pusher, chronograph locking slide and repetition slide to the band; over-sized pendant and crown. Accompanied by original fitted wooden presentation case, Certificate of Origin, spare glasses, spare main and repeating springs and Extract from the Archives. Diameter 54mm, depth 15mm (excluding glasses)

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-05-16
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An exquisite

Rolex Case, dial, movement and bracelet signed Rolex has created some of the most surprising, beautiful and unusual watches for the Arab States in the Gulf. The manufacture's custom pieces date back to the 1950s, when Rolex fitted Arabic discs to the most luxurious Day-Date watches.Most probably unique, this watch is unlike anything the market has ever seen before. In lieu of white gold markers are white Arabic-Indic numerals printed directly on the black dial. Having never appeared at auction, it has only previously been published in literature.Throughout the years, Rolex has cultivated and sustained its successful relationship with the Arab States by producing a multitude of special order watches for the region. This watch was most certainly made upon special order, very likely for a member of the Middle Eastern royal family. The watch bears a 3.655 million serial number and is one among a batch of known watches delivered to the Middle East.Manufactured by Singer, this dial is made in accordance with all the production techniques and quality standards of the time. Attention should be given to the absence of traditional holes for the hour markers. Apart from first series dials stamped “Singer Brevet AV” that feature glued numerals, dials with the single designation “Singer” are designed with holes.The absence proves that this dial was never meant to have applied indexes and is also testament to its originality. Most importantly, the dial feet have never been broken off or re-soldered, meaning this dial was never altered. Thus, it cannot be characterized as a sample, test or prototype. Rather, it was made and destined for an actual watch reserved for a client.The visual effect of the bi-colour is dazzling and compelling. The “Sigma” designation at 6 o’clock refers to the white gold Rolex crown at 12 o’clock. Most interestingly, the design and font of the Arabic-Indic numerals is incredibly similar to a modern Rolex production watch – the platinum Day-Date 40 with Arabic-Indic numerals sold only by Middle East retailers.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2018-05-12
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Ilbery, London, movement attributed to Frères Rochat, No. 271, enamel attributed to Jean-Louis Richter, Geneva, circa 1800. Magnificent, highly import

Ilbery, London, movement attributed to Frères Rochat, No. 271, enamel attributed to Jean-Louis Richter, Geneva, circa 1800. Magnificent, highly important, 18K gold and enamel, pin-set petite sonnerie striking clock with singing bird rising and singing every hour or on demand. C. The top with urn concealing the bird inside, with enamel flower medallion within half pearl frame against repeated motif of oval white enamel rings with gold acanthus leaves, separated by green and red enamel circles, gold scroll-shaped handles, standing on square pedestal with four gold and enamel finials terminated with good-size pearls, translucent dark blue enamel decorated with gold floral garlands in the front and back, sides with scrolling applied gold motifs, center with round case fea-turing hexagonal enameled panels on the sides, one depicting children in an Alpine rural landscape, the other a young lady with a suitor in classical costumes, half pearl frames, back with hinged panel centered by a finely painted young lady with another young suitor, gold paillon frame, translucent dark blue enamel border against engine-turning, edge pierced and engraved for sound with gold laurel leaves and green paillon repeated pattern, molded champlevé enameled base, the whole standing on a rectangular base with scalloped edges with the lid in champlevé translucent dark blue enamel over engine-turning painted in a black geometrical pattern, azure blue and gold foliate border, front and back painted with pastoral scene, river, Alpine landscape in the background, the other with five people enjoying themselves in a rural landscape, Alpine background, half pearl frame, molded base decorated with champlevé enamel, and gold foliate pattern, circular feet decorated with acanthus leaves, Zephyr among scrolling hanging from below the base between the feet. D. White enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute track with fifteen-minute Arabic markers, winding aperture for going train at 10 o’clock, striking at 2 o’clock. M. 47 mm. (21’’’), gilt brass full plate, fusee and chain, cylin-drical pillars, verge escapement, plain brass three-arm balance, adjustable potence, blued steel balance spring, striking on a single snail controlling both quarters and hours striking, striking on a bell with two large hammers, lever at 5 o’clock for sin-ging/silent. Singing bird box: Rectangular, 86 x 46, brass, fusee and chain, eight cams controlling the whistle, and the move-ment of the beak and tail; three additional ones for controlling the bird’s other movements, i.e. raising, tuning, flapping wings, moving tail and opening beak, bellows driven by eccentric arm from the second wheel, rectangular bellows, 8-arm fly regulator. Signed on the case, bird movement punched with number "271". Dim. Height 23cm., base width 11cm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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"Pendule Mystérieuse Portique No. 4", 18K yellow gold, rock crystal, mother-of-pearl and jade, diamond-set eight day going Art-Deco Portico Mystery Cl

"Pendule Mystérieuse Portique No. 4", 18K yellow gold, rock crystal, mother-of-pearl and jade, diamond-set eight day going Art-Deco Portico Mystery Clock with hexagonal dial Paris, 1924 The entablature is centered by a rock crystal panel with black enamelled and diamond-set Chinese decoration; it is supported by two rock crystal columns applied with black champlevé enamelled gold and carved jade floral vases above the two stepped onyx bases, linked together by a rock crystal bar. The faceted hexagonal rock crystal dial with dragon shaped diamond-set hands is suspended from the entablature by a carved jade motif with diamond-set border. The dial is framed by a black champlevé enamelled bezel with seedpearl border and applied with alternating rose-eut diamond-set platinum Roman numerals and carved jadeite jade motifs, the band with raised Chinese scalloped black enamelled motifs inlaid with plaques of mother-of-pearl. Movement concealed in the entablature, the winding holes covered with a black enamelled plaque applied with a gold and enamel hinged handle designed as the Chinese symbol for "longevity", Shou. Rectangular brass movement with going barrel, frosted and gilt platform with straight line lever escapement, cut bimetallic balance, Breguet balance spring. Measuring approx. 39 x 28 x 14 cm. Cartier Certificate of Authenticity N° 2434. Estimate: * * *

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1996-11-19
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Klockor & Ur

Armbandsur för dam och herr, fickur, golvur, väggklockor och bordsur finns att hitta på auktion under denna kategori. Ni hittar såväl vintageklockor som moderiktiga designklockor för alla dess smaker på våra klockauktioner.