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LADIES 18CT GOLD ROLEX DATEJUST WATCH

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As a mysterious clock, “L’Esprit des Cabinotiers” sums up all that the Manufacture has offered over a quar-ter of a millennium, and indeed continues t

As a mysterious clock, “L’Esprit des Cabinotiers” sums up all that the Manufacture has offered over a quar-ter of a millennium, and indeed continues to offer at the most demanding and most accomplished level of haute horlogerie and artistic craftsmanship. Its name, referring to the Geneva watchmaker-craftsmen who used to work under the rooftops, eloquently embodies an approach focused on the tireless quest for tech-nical and aesthetic perfection, inextricably entwined with the brand’s geographical and historical origins. This exceptionally majestic object asserts its powerful presence in harmony with the traditions of 18th century timepieces made in extremely limited editions, table clocks driven by highly sophisticated mechanisms and clothed in an aura of supreme refinement. Spring Mechanism This masterpiece consists of a golden sphere engraved by hand according to the sky chart drawn by Robert deVaugondy (1723-1786), geographer to Louis XV and creator of two large globes, one celestial and the other ter-restrial.The sphere is composed of eight petals symbolizing the lotus flower, which may be progressively openedby means of an extremely sophisticated spring mechanism. The keys to the mystery and its revelation are knownexclusively to the owner of the object. The flower delicately reveals its heart, a timepiece endowed with a widerange of functions and complications. This complex mechanism captures the essence and thedensity of time. Celestial Sphere Mechanism When set into motion, the pink gold sphere opens up like a lotus flower, a symbol of harmony, and unfolds itseight petals, while a central telescopic cylinder raises the timepiece nestling at its heart. With its sixteen smallconnecting rods, tiny sapphire balls and articulations, this original mechanism is entirely in keeping with thenoblest watchmaking traditions, as well as with the equally time-honored art of automata. It is therefore hardlysurprising that it was crafted by a master of this extremely rare speciality.The overall effect is dynamic, ethereal, mysterious and poetic, while the cabinet of the timepiece rests firmly onthree solid gold feet. The transparency of the glare-proofed sapphire crystal provides ideal visual access, fromthe front as well as from the back, to the watchmakers’ work magnified by the masters of decoration. The goldand steel structure discreetly houses the function correctors, while two tiny holes drilled through the sapphireshell on the back of the clock serve to wind the mechanism by means of a key concealed within the base.Attention is thus naturally focused on the hand-guilloché gold dial embellished with the same motif as the other250th anniversary creations, but featuring an extremely large diameter. The center is graced with gold hour andminute hands as well as a slender deadbeat seconds hand. Compared with the classic sweep seconds hand, thedeadbeat seconds hand jumps once per second.A small central subdial displays a second time-zone, topped by four horizontal apertures showing the perpetualcalendar indications – day of the week, date, month and leap years. In terms of such sovereign complications,“L’Esprit des Cabinotiers” offers automatic hour and quarter striking and the repeating function on request. The8-day power reserve appears in a counter at noon.The lower part of the dial is occupied at 8 by the equation of time, meaning the running indication of the dif-ferencebetween mean time and true time, which fluctuates throughout the year. The moon phase, with its hand-engraved18 carat gold disc, is positioned at 6 against a starlit sky in lapis lazuli. The hand of the thermometerlocated at 4 is in blued steel, as indeed are those on the other counters.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2005-04-03
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Piguet & Meylan, Genève, the enamel attributable to Jean Abraham Lissignol, Geneva, the case attributable to Jean-Georges Rémond, Geneva, made for the

Piguet & Meylan, Genève, the enamel attributable to Jean Abraham Lissignol, Geneva, the case attributable to Jean-Georges Rémond, Geneva, made for the Chinese Market, circa 1820.Le CœurA highly important gold, enamel, pearl and turquoise-set, heart-shaped, quarter repeating musical automaton, centre-seconds, watch, in original silver fitted protecting case. C. Two-body, massive hinged at the top, the covers entirely pavé with double rows of decreasing split-pearls alternating with blue champlevé enamelled lines; the back centred with an exceptionally fine enamelled allegorical representation of Venus and Cupid, painted by Lissignol. Pearl-set bezel and intertwined turquoise set arrows. The front face decorated en suite and centred with the dial. The back panel opening and decorated inside on the edge with eau-de-nile enamel, the plate surroundinghe movement engraved with ribbon flowers enamelled in green and red flinqué colours against a pale blue champlevé ground. The enamel panel of the automaton scene finely painted with a lake-side landscape, applied with a varicoloured gold scene depicting a maiden playing a lute and a young man playing a harmonica, a windmill turning in the background. D. White enamel, with Roman numerals, outer minute and seconds ring. Blued-steel "scotties" hands with counter-poised centre-seconds. M. Gilt brasswith free standing barrel, cylinder escapement with plain three-arm balance and blued-steel flat balance spring. Pinned disc musical musical train with 20 individual tuned teeth, playing at the hour or at will, the Music/Silent lever in the edge. Repeating on two gong by depressing the pendant.Dim. 95 x 65 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1999-11-13
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AN EXCEPTIONAL AND VERY RARE GOLD PERPETUAL CALENDAR CHRONOGRAPH WRISTWATCH

18k, damascened nickel lever movement, 23 jewels, mono-metallic compensation balance, 8 adjustments, precision regulator, silvered dial, applied arabic and dot numerals, three subsidiary dials for constant seconds, 30-minute register, date combined with aperture for moon phases, apertures for day and month, outer tachometer scale, luminous hands, circular case with scooped bezel, down-turned stepped lugs with satin finished sides, rectangular satin finished flat pushers with polished sides, snap-off satin finished case back with dated monogram, case, dial and movement signed, the inside case back additionally with Asprey hallmark, accompanied by an Extract from the Archives and an 18k Patek buckle.  EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVES The accompanying Extract from the Patek Philippe Archives confirms that this wristwatch was manufactured in 1952 and sold on May 18th, 1956. PROVENANCE The Asprey 2499 was sold by the original owner in the late 1990s after which time it was purchased by a distinguished collector. It is now offered at auction for the first time. Reference 2499 was manufactured between 1950 and 1985. During the 35 years of production, just 349 pieces were made, equating to an average of 9 examples a year. The first series is by far the rarest and research shows that there may have been no more than 40 pieces made in yellow gold. With its crisp flat rectangular pushers, the first series 2499 is immediately distinguishable from all later series, each of which has round chronograph pushers. Currently the only known example of a reference 2499 with the Asprey signature,  Patek Philippe no.868.346 may well be unique. The 2499 is recognised as one of the most important perpetual calendar chronograph wristwatches made by Patek Philippe. When it was launched in 1950, Patek Philippe was still the only watchmaker to manufacture such a complication. As testament to the reference 2499’s classic styling, reflections of the first series 2499 can be seen in the recently launched ref.5970 which echoes its forebear in both design and appearance, especially with its rectangular pushers and tachometer dial. Asprey, Britain's world famous luxury lifestyle house, was founded 225 years ago in 1781. Over its history, the company has courted glamorous and famous clientele from around the world. Asprey received Royal Warrants from both Queen Victoria and King Edward VII. Indeed, at the time of the latter's funeral, it was noted that almost all the Heads of State attended and "many of them came to Asprey, you might have seen three or four of them at once." In the 20th century, the Asprey business grew tremendously and commissions were received from millionaires such as J. Pierpont Morgan and potentates such as the Maharajah of Patiala. Today the company has stores in London, New York, Beverly Hills, Honolulu, Tokyo, Osaka, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, St Moritz and Dubai. Making its first ever appearance at auction, the ‘Asprey’ 2499 is certainly one of the rarest and most significant examples of the reference ever to be offered for sale. The first series 2499 was some 2mm larger in diameter than the reference 1518 that it was introduced to replace. With rounded sides and finely stepped down-turned lugs, the 2499 first series is substantial in size with its 'bassine' case. It is interesting to note the attention to detail on the case finish which is wonderfully preserved on the present lot. The sides of the lugs are satin finished as is the case back and the top and base of the rectangular chronograph pushers; this provides an excellent contrast with the polished case sides, bezel and edges of the pushers. As the only known example of a reference 2499 retailed by Asprey, several features distinctive to this wristwatch can be noted. First and most clearly one can see the Asprey script signature which perfectly fills the date subsidiary. As well as the Patek Philippe signature and numbering, the inside of the case back is additionally stamped with the Asprey signature. The inside case back also features, as one would expect for an English retailed gold watch, the UK import hallmarks, in this instance for London  in 1955. Together with the Extract from the Archives, it can therefore be deduced that the watch was shipped to Asprey, London in 1955 (when it was hallmarked) and sold by Asprey a year later on May 18th, 1956. The initials to the case back are dated 25th May 1956 so the watch may well have been purchased for an anniversary or birthday present.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-11-14
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Breguet, No. 1188, sold to Don Anto-nio of Spain on August 1, 1808 for 3600 Francs

Breguet, No. 1188, sold to Don Anto-nio of Spain on August 1, 1808 for 3600 Francs. Exceptionally fine and extremely rare 18K gold Garde Temps four minute free-sprung tourbillon regulator with 36-hour power reserve indicator, subsidiary seconds and stop seconds, escapement naturel with fast train, and Turkish dial, in its Morocco fitted box, accompanied by 1927 Certificate. C. Four-body, massive, concealed hinges, back cover with sunburst engine-turned center on Barley corn engine-turned back-ground, engine-turned bezels, gold hinged cuvette. D. White, enamel, Islamic hour chapter ring in the center, outer minute track with 15-minute Islamic markers, up-and-down sector at 6 o’clock, subsidiary seconds at 10 o’clock, stop-seconds at 2 o’clock. M. 53.5 mm. (24’’’), gilt half-plate, reversed fusee and chain with maintaining-power, 24 ruby and sapphire jewels, four minute tourbillon regulator with escapement naturel, steel escape wheels, the 12-tooth driving one with oil retention slots, double 3-tooth driven wheel (one for locking, the other for impulse), very special detent with triangular locking jewel on spring-loaded lever, 3-arm cut compensation balance of steel/copper-silver alloy, gold temperature screws, platinum meantime screws, blued steel Breguet balance spring mounted in adjustable stud, fast beat train beating 21,600 beats per hour, both second hand wheels are driven from the carriage wheel, one of them is friction set and consequently can be stopped by pressing the pull-and-twist piston in the pendant. Signed on dial, case and movement, dial also with secret signature. Diam. 66 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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PATEK PHILIPPE, THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED EXCEPTIONAL FULL 24-HOUR REPEATING, QUARTER AND SPECIAL-TYPE FIVE-MINUTE REPEATING 24-HOURS IN ONE REVOLUTION

PATEK PHILIPPE, THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED EXCEPTIONAL FULL 24-HOUR REPEATING, QUARTER AND SPECIAL-TYPE FIVE-MINUTE REPEATING 24-HOURS IN ONE REVOLUTION POCKET WATCH Patek Philippe & Cie, Genève, movement No. 97443, case No. 212850. Sold to Monsieur E. E. Hoesch, Villa Barbaia, Mergellina, Naples, on November 27, 1894 for 3750 Swiss Francs. Exceptional, highly important and almost certainly unique, large, full 24-hour, quarter and special-type five-minute repeating, 18K pink gold, keyless pocket watch with perpetual calendar, chronograph, moon phases, lunar calendar and 24-hour dial for 24-hours in one revolution. Accompanied by the original Certificate of Origin and Patek Philippe sales receipt. C. Four-body, bassine, polished, fi ve-bar hinges, bolt at 23 for locking the chronograph, co-axial button in the crown for the start/stop and return-to-zero of the chronograph. Hinged gold cuvette with setting nibs for the calendar and moon phases on the edge. D. White enamel with radial 24-hour dauphine numerals, red 24, outer minutes track and concentric chronograph divisions with outermost fi ve-second numerals, 15, 30, 45 and 60 in red, subsidiary dials for the date in red concentric with seconds, the days of the week and the months, aperture for the moon phases with lunar calendar on the periphery. Blued steel spade hour and minute hands, gold calendar hands. M. 22’’’, rhodium plated, fausses cotes decoration, 35 jewels, wolf’s tooth winding, counterpoised and calibrated straightline lever escapement, cut bimetallic compensation balance with meantime and temperature adjustment screws, blued steel Breguet balance spring with terminal curve, swan-neck micrometer regulator, repeating on gongs activated by a slide on the band. Case, cuvette and movement signed. Diam. 60 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2011-11-13
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Mahatma Gandhi’s Pocketwatch Formely owned by Mahatma Gandhi, political and spiritual leader of India, later given to his grandniece, Abha Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi’s Pocketwatch Formely owned by Mahatma Gandhi, political and spiritual leader of India, later given to his grandniece, Abha Gandhi. Accompanied by Gandhi’s sandals, bowl, plate, glasses, images of Gandhi and letters of authenticity from Ghita Mehta, Talatsahid Khan Babi, and Professor Lester Kurtz. The watch: Zenith, movement No. 421357, case No. 49529. Made circa 1910. Fine, rare and Historically Important, sterling silver keyless pocket watch with alarm function. C. Three body, "bassine", hinged engine-turned case back, hinged silver cuvette. D. White enamel with luminous Arabic numerals, outer minute track, subsidiary sunk dials for the seconds at 6 and the alarm at 12. Blued steel skeleton hands. M. Cal. 21"', gilt brass, 15 jewels, straight-line lever escapement, cut bimetallic compensation balance, blued steel Breguet balance spring, index regulator. Dial and movement signed, numbered on the case. Diam. 49 mm. Thickness 16 mm. The Sandals: Gandhi apparently gave the sandals to a British military officer in Aden in 1931 during his trip from Bombay to London. The officer took photographs of Gandhi in Aden prior to the Roundtable talks regarding Indian Independence. In exchange, it is believed that Gandhi gave the officer his sandals. The Bowl/plate (thali): The bowl and the plate (thali) were also gifts that Gandhi bestowed upon Abha, his grandniece. They are accompanied by letters of authenticity from Ghita Mehta, Abha's daughter who inherited them upon Abha’s death. She writes that both the bowl and the thali were used by Gandhi and given to her mother as gifts in the 1940s. The Glasses: This pair of glasses having belonged to Gandhi are thought to have been given to Colonel H. H. Shiri Diwan Nawab, Sir Muhammed Mahabat Khanji, the 3rd Rasul Khanji, Nawab Sahib of Junagadh, by Gandhi, most probably at his Ashram in Ahmedabad in the 1930s. It is said that when Mahabat asked Gandhi for inspiration, Gandhi handed over his glasses saying they were the “eyes” that had given him vision to free India. The glasses are accompanied by a letter of authenticity from the Colonel’s great grandson, Talatsahid Khan Babi and another from Dr. Lester Kurtz.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2009-03-05
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Annons
Annons

“Tour de I’lle Antiquorum” Vacheron Constantin, Genève, “Tour de I’lle”, Pièce Unique. Made to mark the occasion of the Quarter Millennium of Vacheron

“Tour de I’lle Antiquorum” Vacheron Constantin, Genève, “Tour de I’lle”, Pièce Unique. Made to mark the occasion of the Quarter Millennium of Vacheron Constantin in 2005. Exceptional and unique, astronomical and astrological, double-face, 18K pink gold (5N) gentleman’s minute repeating wristwatch with perpetual calendar and leap year, “Sirius” star chart, celestial annual calendar, visible one-minute tourbillon regulator, sunrise and sunset indication, perpetual equation of time, phases and age of the moon, 58-hour power reserve, second time zone, day-night indication, couple de sonnerie and black guilloché dials. C. three-body, round, bezels with serrated edge, rounded band, curved sloped “250 ans” lugs, anti-reflectivesapphire crystals. The front bezel revolves to activate the minute repeat.Dials:- Recto; solid gold, black, “250 ans” guilloché, applied pink gold faceted baton indexes, off-center minutetrack, subsidiary dial for the second time zone in 24 hours with day-night indication, moon phase aperturewith lunar age scale, couple de sonnerie and 58-hour power reserve sectors and aperture with seconds trackto view the revolving one-minute tourbillon. Pink gold “éventail” hands, applied pink gold Seal of Geneva.- Verso; solid gold, black, “250 ans” guilloché, subsidiary dials for the day, date and month, leap year aper-tureand equation of time sector arranged in the upper half of the dial, in the lower half the “Sirius” star chart,celestial annual calendar and sunrise and sunset sectors. Pink gold “éventail” hands.Movement: Cal. 2750, stamped with the Seal of Geneva, rhodium plated, “fausses-cotes” decoration, 834 com-ponents,38 jewels, lateral lever escapement, one-minute tourbillon regulator, the carriage in the form of the“Maltese Cross”, free-sprung monometallic balance with a frequency of 2,5Hz, (18,000A/h) shock-absorber, self-compensatingBreguet balance-spring, repeating on gongs via revolving bezel, two-position winding and settingsystem, adjustment for second time zone, moon phases, and perpetual calendar via five pushpieces in the band,adjustment for sidereal disc by the crown and a lockable pushbutton on the band at 8.Dimensions: diameter 47 mm, thickness 17.8 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2005-04-03
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Nightingale and Fledglings. FR (Frères Rochat), Geneva, No. 228, probably made for the Russian market, circa 1814

Nightingale and Fledglings. FR (Frères Rochat), Geneva, No. 228, probably made for the Russian market, circa 1814. Magnificent, highly important and probably unique gold and enamel, diamond-set miniature singing bird cage with center-seconds petite sonnerie clockwatch, the three birds singing on the hour or at will. C. Octagonal base, side panels very finely painted on enamel with lakeside scenes, watch in the front surrounded by green enamel plaque painted with garlands of flowers and red ribbons, back with bouquet of flowers, chased and engraved gold background, canted corners with azure enamel plaques applied to a chased and foliate engraved gold background, spring-loaded front panel reveals winding and setting arbors, striking/silence lever, singing/silence lever, activation lever at the left edge. The cage, following the shape of the base, supported on four sets of two Corinthian columns in rose gold with yellow gold capitals and floral bases, mesh wire screen at the base, the cage itself formed of rose gold lances. The dome stands on a gold and chased ribbon bordered with black champlevé enamel, with alternating diamonds and azure enamel segments centered by gold leaves, the eight panels of the dome formed of alternating segments of gold wire mesh with applied painted on enamel flower garlads and pierced and florally engraved gold segments separated by half-round gold wire with translucent imperial blue enamel, the base of the dome decorated with translucent red, green, and blue enamel over flinqué forming flowers, foliage and a setting sun, the gold cage floor pierced and engraved with arches and a fleur-de-lis pattern. Inside a nightingale rests on a gold bar, a gold wire mesh nest with two baby birds resting on a green enamel pedestal painted with flowers. Gold ring handle mounted in gold finial decorated with painted on enamel flowers on a pale green ground, gold neck, gold ball feet.D. White enamel, radial Roman numerals, outer minute divisions. Blued steel Breguet hands.M. Rectangular 45 x 30 mm, brass, fixed barrels, cylinder escapement, three-arm gold balance with flat balance spring, striking based on a single cam with each of the 12 hour notches divided into three for quarters, striking on two bells, hour-hammer pusher lifted after striking hours, pinion governor set in eccentric bushing for speed regulation.Singing bird movement. Octagonal, 86 x 72 mm, brass, reversed fusee and chain, rectangular bellows, six-wheel train (including fusee), 3rd wheel arbor set with eight spring-loaded cams which make 4 revolutions per song - they mostly control the singing, the extension of its arbor is fixed with a set of six cams and a pusher for the Maltese cross set on the 4th wheel and fitted with loosely revolving 4-step cam at the top which changes the position of the cams at each turn. The top cams control the movements of the birds, 2-wing governor with adjustable weights set on a worm (endless) gear.Signed and numbered on both sides of the singing-bird movement and on front plate of the watch movement.Dim. Height 271 mm, base 98 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2003-10-11
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1914, no.174.480; an important and unique double open-faced minute repeating perpetual calendar keyless lever watch with split seconds chronograph

Patek Philippe, 1914, no.174.480; an important and unique double open-faced minute repeating perpetual calendar keyless lever watch with split seconds chronograph and register, especially made for George Thompson 18k, unusual nickel lever movement, 37 jewels, guillaume balance with gold screws, 8 adjustments, blued steel Breguet over-coil balance spring, swan-neck precision regulator, backplate signed and numbered and with perpetual work visibly mounted against fausse côtes decoration, enamel moon-phase wheel highlighted with gold moon and stars, repeating on two coiled steel gongs, the front plate with côte circulaire decoration and unusually mounted with the chronograph mechanism and split seconds pincer, signed and numbered underneath bezel and additionally numbered to the edge of the movement. Time and Chronograph Dial white enamel dial, black enamel Breguet numerals, blued steel spade hands, sector for 30-minute register, outer ring calibrated for minutes/chronograph seconds, constant subsidiary seconds, blued steel split seconds hands, signed Patek Philippe & Cie, Geneva, Switzerland Perpetual Calendar Dial white enamel, three subsidiary dials for day, month and date, calibrated in red enamel, aperture for age and phases of the moon, signed George Thompson St Paul Minn. 1914. The Case 18k gold, both bezels engine turned, chronograph pusher through the crown; split pusher, chronograph locking slide and repetition slide to the band; over-sized pendant and crown. Accompanied by original fitted wooden presentation case, Certificate of Origin, spare glasses, spare main and repeating springs and Extract from the Archives. Diameter 54mm, depth 15mm (excluding glasses)

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-05-16
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Ilbery, London, movement attributed to Frères Rochat, No. 271, enamel attributed to Jean-Louis Richter, Geneva, circa 1800. Magnificent, highly import

Ilbery, London, movement attributed to Frères Rochat, No. 271, enamel attributed to Jean-Louis Richter, Geneva, circa 1800. Magnificent, highly important, 18K gold and enamel, pin-set petite sonnerie striking clock with singing bird rising and singing every hour or on demand. C. The top with urn concealing the bird inside, with enamel flower medallion within half pearl frame against repeated motif of oval white enamel rings with gold acanthus leaves, separated by green and red enamel circles, gold scroll-shaped handles, standing on square pedestal with four gold and enamel finials terminated with good-size pearls, translucent dark blue enamel decorated with gold floral garlands in the front and back, sides with scrolling applied gold motifs, center with round case fea-turing hexagonal enameled panels on the sides, one depicting children in an Alpine rural landscape, the other a young lady with a suitor in classical costumes, half pearl frames, back with hinged panel centered by a finely painted young lady with another young suitor, gold paillon frame, translucent dark blue enamel border against engine-turning, edge pierced and engraved for sound with gold laurel leaves and green paillon repeated pattern, molded champlevé enameled base, the whole standing on a rectangular base with scalloped edges with the lid in champlevé translucent dark blue enamel over engine-turning painted in a black geometrical pattern, azure blue and gold foliate border, front and back painted with pastoral scene, river, Alpine landscape in the background, the other with five people enjoying themselves in a rural landscape, Alpine background, half pearl frame, molded base decorated with champlevé enamel, and gold foliate pattern, circular feet decorated with acanthus leaves, Zephyr among scrolling hanging from below the base between the feet. D. White enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute track with fifteen-minute Arabic markers, winding aperture for going train at 10 o’clock, striking at 2 o’clock. M. 47 mm. (21’’’), gilt brass full plate, fusee and chain, cylin-drical pillars, verge escapement, plain brass three-arm balance, adjustable potence, blued steel balance spring, striking on a single snail controlling both quarters and hours striking, striking on a bell with two large hammers, lever at 5 o’clock for sin-ging/silent. Singing bird box: Rectangular, 86 x 46, brass, fusee and chain, eight cams controlling the whistle, and the move-ment of the beak and tail; three additional ones for controlling the bird’s other movements, i.e. raising, tuning, flapping wings, moving tail and opening beak, bellows driven by eccentric arm from the second wheel, rectangular bellows, 8-arm fly regulator. Signed on the case, bird movement punched with number "271". Dim. Height 23cm., base width 11cm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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"Pendule Mystérieuse Portique No. 4", 18K yellow gold, rock crystal, mother-of-pearl and jade, diamond-set eight day going Art-Deco Portico Mystery Cl

"Pendule Mystérieuse Portique No. 4", 18K yellow gold, rock crystal, mother-of-pearl and jade, diamond-set eight day going Art-Deco Portico Mystery Clock with hexagonal dial Paris, 1924 The entablature is centered by a rock crystal panel with black enamelled and diamond-set Chinese decoration; it is supported by two rock crystal columns applied with black champlevé enamelled gold and carved jade floral vases above the two stepped onyx bases, linked together by a rock crystal bar. The faceted hexagonal rock crystal dial with dragon shaped diamond-set hands is suspended from the entablature by a carved jade motif with diamond-set border. The dial is framed by a black champlevé enamelled bezel with seedpearl border and applied with alternating rose-eut diamond-set platinum Roman numerals and carved jadeite jade motifs, the band with raised Chinese scalloped black enamelled motifs inlaid with plaques of mother-of-pearl. Movement concealed in the entablature, the winding holes covered with a black enamelled plaque applied with a gold and enamel hinged handle designed as the Chinese symbol for "longevity", Shou. Rectangular brass movement with going barrel, frosted and gilt platform with straight line lever escapement, cut bimetallic balance, Breguet balance spring. Measuring approx. 39 x 28 x 14 cm. Cartier Certificate of Authenticity N° 2434. Estimate: * * *

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1996-11-19
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An extremely fine and important sapphire tonneau-form skeletonized

cal. RM56-02 manual winding tourbillon movement, 19 jewels, sapphire centre bridges and titanium movement baseplate suspended from single-braided cable through 8 pulleys  skeletonized dial, outer minute track sapphire tonneau-form case, sapphire crystal bezel and display back secured by 12 screws  case, dial and movement signed  with a transparent strap by Aerospace Nano® and titanium Richard Mille folding clasp Accompanied by Richard Mille warranty and a traveling pouch. Created for the Hong Kong Watches & Wonder event in 2015, the magnificent RM56-02 Sapphire Tourbillon is the watchmaking milestone for it's complex case design for the weightlessness and transparency. This timepiece is centred on two innovations, the first being the cable and pulley system that suspends the movement from the sapphire case taken from their RM 27-01 Nadal watch; and second, the unparalleled use of sapphire to create transparent components. Being cut and milled from solid blocks of sapphire, RM56-02's entire case, including the front bezel, caseband and back bezel. Knowing as a particularly scratch-resistant material, sapphire creates the transparency to the timepiece based on its molecular composition. The three-part case is made entirely of sapphire crystal making it scratch resistant. This wristwatch is a true testament to Richard Milles commitment to perfection as the case has to be milled and ground from solid pieces of sapphire and takes up to 40 days to create one RM 56-02 case and an additional 400 hours for the sapphire bridge. Furthermore, the grade 5 titanium baseplate is suspended by a system of four pulleys on the case as well as six pulleys on the baseplate itself, which is all held together with a 0.35mm braided cable. With only 10 pieces produced, technique and creativity is what makes this watch a novel piece in the Richard Mille collection and beyond. This elegant and complex wristwatch features unique components that reinforce the brands craftsmanship and innovation. It is a rare collectors watch that is seldom presented.

  • HKGHongkong (S.A.R. Kina)
  • 2017-10-01
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Geneva, attributable to Frères Rochat, made for the Chinese market, circa 1820. Extremely rare and magnificent pair of gold and enamel pearl- and diam

Geneva, attributable to Frères Rochat, made for the Chinese market, circa 1820. Extremely rare and magnificent pair of gold and enamel pearl- and diamond-set singing bird pistols. C. Made entirely of gold and enamel in the form of a double-barreled flintlock pistol, conjoined hexagonal barrels in translucent dark blue enamel over flinqué with gold scrollwork simulating damascene work, the opening set with diamonds and terminating with hinged panel enameled on the outside with black enamel and inside painted with a bird among flowers, the gold pan sides with rectangular gold plaques with concave corners, one depicting a sleeping lion, the other an antelope with black enamel border in diamond-set frame, the bottom of the pan decorated with a pattern of alternating straps of gold and black enamel, the grips with translucent scarlet enamel over engine-turning with pearl-set rosette in the middle with rose-cut diamond in the center, lower edge set with half pearls, upper edge decorated with wreath of laurel leaves made of graduated half pearls and black enamel, the back of the grip decorated with gold and black enamel fine crossing pattern with scrolling set with graduated half pearls. The top edge set with half pearls, gold matted and engraved hammers, the head of the flint vise engraved with lion’s heads, gold vise nuts terminated with diamonds, agate flints, gold pan covers mirror polished inside and engraved with acanthus leaves on the outside with their springs terminating with diamonds, opening under the right pan cover for sound, three barrel-like ramrod pipes, the ramrod containing the key for the watch. -{266}- 835 Frères Rochat Property of a West Coast Gentleman M. Rectangular, two tier, each slightly different, 115 x 29 mm, brass, reversed fusee and chain, six cams set on the extension of the second wheel arbor controlling the sound (whistle), the bird’s movements (turning, flapping wings, opening the beak and moving tail) controlled by two cams set on the same arbor between the plates, unusual mechanism for lifting and retrieving the bird, where both functions have their own mechanisms, each with its own spring, circular bellows. Punched with unidentified mark on chain ring of one of the pistols. Dim. Length 145 mm., width 38 mm. To be sold without reserve

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2006-05-14
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An 18k yellow gold chronograph with daniels independent double-wheel

• gilt brass movement with Lepine calibre construction, 32-hour duration, two going barrels with contra-rotating trains driving the two escape wheels of the Daniels independent double-wheel, incorporating a 'Y' shaped central locking detent with three pallets, mono-metallic stainless steel four-arm balance with gold adjusting screws and Daniels auxiliary compensation, free-sprung overcoil balance spring, the two trains calculated for mean-solar and sidereal time including seconds, annual calendar ring with kidney-cam and equation of time indication, accurate lunar dial driven from the sidereal train and indication of the age and phase of the moon, centre-seconds chronograph mechanism engaging either train, selected by a lever on the movement • silver engine-turned dial with 24-hour chapter ring to the left for sidereal time, 12-hour chapter ring to the right for mean-solar time, each with overlapping subsidiary seconds dials below, roman and arabic numerals, outer seconds track for chronograph, aperture in the mean-solar chapter ring for the annual calendar, apertures in the sidereal dial for the age and phase of the moon, fan-form sector above for equation of time, signed Daniels in a cartouche below the seconds rings, gold Daniels hands to the mean-solar dials and blued-steel Daniels hands to the sidereal dials and chronograph • case with engine-turned bezels, glazed back with two round buttons in the band for chronograph, Daniels pendant and bow • dial and movement signed • attached yellow gold double-link chain and gold and blued steel double ended key Accompanied by a George Daniels presentation case. In 1974 Dr. Daniels invented the independent double-wheel escapement; the movement was to captivate collectors with its visual appeal of symmetrical trains. Dr. Daniels was on a trip to Zurich where he met an important collector for dinner.  The collector nudged him and said ‘what do you have in your pocket’, so he took out his watch, a gold Daniels pocket watch with independent double-wheel escapement. The collector said he had to have the watch and asked him to sell it to him. Dr. Daniels said it was not for sale but the collector persisted. Dr. Daniels thought this was an enormous compliment as he did not even ask the price, and so sold him the watch. Dr. Daniels immediately regretted selling this watch and therefore decided to make another which would be an improvement on the first both in terms of complication and accuracy. Having not fully exploited the first watch, the second watch would have separate calculations for each train, it was therefore possible to indicate both mean-solar and sidereal time. In the 18thcentury to check the accuracy of your watch you had to have a precision clock which was set by a star. This watch by means of having solar and sidereal time could make the calculation for you, the difference being 3.555 minutes per day. To try and improve the calculation of the train which allowed for an error of 0.8 seconds per year Dr. Daniels contacted a friend at Cambridge University to ask if they knew of a mathematician interested in watches. He got a response almost immediately and extraordinarily enough the mathematicians name was Professor Daniels.  The professor was able to calculate a better ratio of 0.28 seconds per day, which Dr. Daniels was very happy with. Dr. Daniels used to say to people, ‘when you are on your package tour to Mars you need a watch like this, and when using the telephone for long distance calls you could switch the chronograph into sidereal time to cut your bills by 3.555 minutes per day’. Originally the watch had been referred to as the Daniels squared (2) because of the assistance he received from Professor Henry Daniels but Dr. Daniels did not think this was good enough so named it the ‘Space Travellers’ watch in honour of the American landing on the moon which was the greatest space exploratory journey of the century. Sotheby's sold the first Space Travellers' watch on 17th November 1988 in Geneva for 220,000 CHF.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2012-11-06
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La leçon de chant Frères Rochat, Geneva, No. 120, made for the Chinese market, circa 1815

La leçon de chant Frères Rochat, Geneva, No. 120, made for the Chinese market, circa 1815. Exceptional and unique large rectangular 18K gold and enamel pearl- and diamond-set large singing bird box featuring two birds with rare forward movement of the head and body. C. Four-body, the center of the front lid with aperture for large very finely painted on enamel medallion with flowers and fruits, which when lifted reveals two birds rising over a realistically painted enamel nest with straw and flowers and champlevé enamel border. Between them is a vase with diamond-set flowers, at which the birds appear to peck. The birds rotate, turn their heads, move their heads back and forth, lean forward, flap their wings and and tails and open their beaks to sing, one after the other. The top panel decorated with gold scrolling and champlevé foliate and floral patterns against pink champlevé enamel, outer edges and aperture set with half pearls, one side hinged revealing the key compartment. Side panels and the base decorated with translucent green enamel over double pattern engine-turning with frames of white and pink champlevé enamel and blue enamel flowers. M. Rectangular, 100 x 65 mm. brass, large going barrel, twelve cams and a whistle with sliding piston for the song’s modulation. The cams rotate four times per song and lift one step every rotation, allowing a long duration of singing. Addfitional set of four cams mounted on the extension of the third wheel for controlling the bird movement. Cam and fusee-like chain controlling the raising of the medallion and the birds. Punched with the maker’s mark FR and serial number on the inside of the front plate. Diam. 105 x 72 x 40 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2002-10-19
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A small silver-mounted ebony roman striking table clock, London, dated 1677

6-inch latched velvet-covered dial with silver winged cherub spandrels and chapter ring, the centre with circular foliate pierced and engraved plaque signed Joseph Knibb Londini Fecit, two train fusee movement with five latched baluster pillars, tic-tac escapement and striking  the roman notation on two bells, the backplate signed Joseph Knibb Londini Inventit and Fecit Anno Domini 1677, further decorated with engraved sprays within a wheatear border, numbered count wheel, the domed case with carrying handle and pierced frets, the corners with ball finials, the front door with winged cherub escutcheons Joseph Knibb, the most famous and inventive member of the celebrated Knibb clockmaking family was born circa 1640. He was apprenticed to his cousin Samuel in about 1655 and after serving seven years worked first at Oxford and then moved to London in 1670 where he was made Free of the Clockmakers' Company. He must soon have built up a good reputation for himself as it is recorded that he supplied a turret clock for Windsor Castle in 1677 and payments were made to him in 1682 on behalf of King Charles II. No other maker produced such an intriguing variety of striking and repeating mechanisms and perhaps the most interesting of these is the Roman system employed in this clock. It is an ingenious method of accurately sounding the hours by a smaller number of blows than the conventional system. Two bells are used, the smaller of which indicates the Roman I as displayed on the dial and the larger bell the Roman V. The Roman X is indicated by two blows on the larger bell. The greatest number of blows struck at any hour is four at 8 and 12 o'clock. The advantage of the Roman system is that the clock has to make only twenty-six blows in twelve hours compared with seventy-eight blows on a conventional clock. The numeral for 4 o'clock, on a Roman striking clock, is shown as IV, requiring only two blows, rather than the more usual IIII. Knibb may have had some difficulty persuading his clients to accept this form of striking as examples are rare and the notation is, at first, confusing. Clocks by Knibb with velvet dials and silver mounts are extremely rare and this example has almost every desirable feature being particularly small, having Roman striking, tic tac escapement and a most interesting inscription which could refer to either or both the striking and escapement. Towards the end of the 17th century Joseph Knibb moved to Hanslop in Buckinghamshire. A few clocks with the Hanslop address are known but by the early years of the 18th Century Knibb had virtually retired; he died in December 1711.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2012-11-06
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Precision Timekeeper with 3 ComplicationsAntide Janvier, "pour son Ami Gorcy, composé à Paris, terminé en 1810".Unique and spectacular, astronomical,

Precision Timekeeper with 3 ComplicationsAntide Janvier, "pour son Ami Gorcy, composé à Paris, terminé en 1810".Unique and spectacular, astronomical, 3 week-going, double overhanging pendulum, "resonance" mantle regulator with two independent trains, each with one-second remontoir and Berthoud type detent escapement. C. Rectangular mahogany base with rounded front corners, applied ormolu decoration in the front depicting two fish spouting water, supporting a protective glass dome. D. White enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, three hands: fleur de lis for the hours and blued steel index for the minutes driven by train No. 1 (left) and "poker" minute hand driven by train No. 2, winding apertures at 4 and 8 o'clock. The dial is flanked by two silvered humpback panels with seconds chapters at the top, theleft one driven by train No. 1 and the right one, running counterclockwise, by train No.2. M. Rectangular, 19,5 cm wide, 12,8 cm high, brass, mounted to heavy brass frame, two trains, each one with its own ingeniously simple constant force Berthoud detent escapement, two brass-steel gridiron compensating pendulums beating half seconds, knife-edge suspensions. Each escapement consist of pivoted rocking frame holding wheel, say, "A" and pivoted in such a way that it meshes with the pinion "B" (10eaves) of the fifth train wheel "C" (10 teeth) resembling an escape wheel. The rocking bar by the force of gravity falls down on the side where the wheel "A" is pivoted. The other side of the wheel meshes with 10-tooth escape wheel so, when the escape wheel is locked, the force of mainspring transmitted by the pinion "B" lifts the wheel A and consequently raises the bar, furnishing constant energy to the escapement. The end of the rocking bar is terminated with a detent that locks the wheel "C"ust after the lifting. The pendulum unlocks the escape wheel which is driven by the falling action of the rocking bar and so delivers an impulse to the pendulum with constant momentum. The pendulum is terminated by a platform holding the impulse pallet and unlocking spring, both with regulating screws. Two spring-loaded steel brackets securing pendulums for transport, four leveling knobs at each corner of the base, with a level at the back of the base, two length-adjustment knobs at the top of te frame.Signed on the movement, the dial, and both pendulums, the subsidiary seconds dials signed "A" and "J".Dim. Height 63 cm, base width 35 mm.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2001-11-11
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"Sympathique" Watch No. 1, accompanied by the Master Clock. A)Unique gold gentleman's astronomical wristwatch, with 1 minute tourbillon, regulator dia

"Sympathique" Watch No. 1, accompanied by the Master Clock. A)Unique gold gentleman's astronomical wristwatch, with 1 minute tourbillon, regulator dial, phase and age of the moon, and winding indicator, automatically wound and set to exact time by the accompanying Clock. Delivered with both gold and leather bracelets with double deployant buckles and a pair-case in gold enabling the wristwatch to be transformed into pocket watch. B)Unique gold astronomical clock with phase and age of the moon, equation of time, centigrade thermometer, year calendar with month and date, and days of the week. Constructed on the principals of the "garde-temps", with "remontoire", visible chronometer escapement and winding indicator. A) Case: Wristwatch; 18 ct., circular, massive and polished with reeded band, the classic Breguet s with an ingenious quick-release system for removing and re-mounting the bracelets. Pocket watch: 18 ct., two body, half-hunting form, engine-turned à grains d'orge, with aperture to reveal the dial, the cover opened by a button in the pendant, and locked closed by a bolt in the band. Dial: Regulator type, silvered and engine-turned, signed: "Breguet No. 1", the subsidiary hour ring with engraved Roman numerals, outer minute ring with Arabic 10 minute numerals, and subsidiary seconds on the edge of the tourbillon aperture. Sector for the up-and-down scale calibrated for 36 hours and an aperture for the moon phase with the age engraved on the border. Blued-steel Breguet hands. Movement: Maillechort, 13"', with fausses cOtes decoration, 23 jewels, lateral lever escapement and monometallic screw balance. Blued-steel Breguet autocompensating balance spring. One minute tourbillon with equidistant three-arm polished steel carriage driven off the third wheel. Mechanism for the instantaneous re-setting of the minute hand to exact time every two T ours mounted under the dial, and correcting the watch for a difference of up to plus-or-minus five minutes, controlled through the winding crown by the clock, along with the automatic rewinding, whenever the watch is placed in the location provided. An autonomy of 24 hours is assured from a rewinding period of 8 hours. Diam. 36 mm. B) Case: 18 ct., Empire style, glazed on four sides and hermetically sealed. Applied hand-chased mounts on all sides, inset against a matted ground, with stylised flower heads around the base, the centre motifs terminating with palm foliage, the flat section corinthian pilasters capped by sun flowers. Recessed panels and the top plate all engine-turned à grains d'orge. Spirally gadrooned bun feet, and turned finials of slightly flattened form with substantial folding handle chased with flowers and lotus leaves and supported by lion heads. Signed on an oval polished white gold plaque at the base: "Breguet - Sympathique - No. 1". Calendar adjustment and hand-setting by means of a female square and push-pieces inset flush into the side pilasters. Hinged and rising bezel allowing the watch to be inserted with either the gold or leather bracelet still partly attached. Dial: Silvered and engine-turned, signed: " Breguet, No. 1", with Roman hour numerals on a plain reserve. Blued-steel Breguet hands. Giltmetal engine-turned dial mask, with sectorshaped apertures for month with date to the left, week day to the right, and sectors above for equation of time on the left and bimetallic thermometer to the right. Moon phase visible at the back of the wristwatch compartment, with blue enamel and gold disk, the age engraved on the border. Movement: Frosted and gilt brass, eight-day going, the twin barrels mounted in the base and wound by a retractable lever below the bottom plate, providing power for both the clock itself and Xe winding and hand-setting of the wristwatch. Remontoire train and the escapement mounted on a horizontal triangular platform rewinding at intervals of 5 seconds. Spring detent escapement, with gold escape wheel, Guillaume balance in brass and invar, with old and platinum adjusting screws. Twin helical gold balance springs, mounted above and below the balance, and working in apposition. Engraved silvered sector for up-and-down scale on the movement top plate. Dim. 255 x 170 x 125 mm. Estimate: SFr. * *

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1991-04-14
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John and james harrison, a historically significant ebonized precision

11¾-inch restored dial with silvered chapter ring signed Jno Harrison, Barrow and set on a broken-arch wood dial plate, decorated with gilt stylized flowers and strap work, the center with putti and apertures for calendar and seconds, the arch signed James Harrison, a maintaining power lever on the upper right side, large wood plated movement with oak wheels, lignum vitae lantern pinions and bushes, grasshopper escapement with brass escape wheel and replaced  adjustable cycloidal cheeks on the backplate, the strike with inside countwheel cut from the great wheel and top mounted bell, the replaced pendulum with brass and steel gridiron rod and calibrated regulation nut, the case with domed caddy cresting and gilt-wood finials, gilt capped hood pilasters, the trunk with shaped top to the door and inset with a gilt-wood lenticle, and a replica equation table behind a glazed panel, the plain plinth with moulded base, the sides with raised panels to allow for the oscillation of the pendulum bob, with a folder containing the history of the clock provided by the late Colonel Quill. John Harrison (1693-1776) is remembered particularly for the wonderful sea clocks that he made in his quest to solve the problem of finding longitude at sea. His early clocks, such as the present longcase clock, had movements that were made of wood and which incorporate a number of unique features which were later used in his sea clocks. His skill with wood was inherited from his father Henry Harrison (1665-1728) who was a joiner. The family moved to Barrow-upon-Humber, a remote village in North Lincolnshire, in 1697 and John Harrison continued to live and work there until the age of 44. Trained by his father to be a joiner he would have been involved in many of the activities in the village and particularly relevant was his involvement with the church and the re-hanging of bells. He was interested in music and undertook the training of the church choir. He must have had an early fascination with horology as he had completed his first clock by 1713 and no doubt had experimented with many test pieces before this. With a lively intellect, and working in isolation away from any of the usual horological manufacturing districts, he developed some unique ways of overcoming the problems of keeping a clock running and ensuring good timekeeping. Although principally a joiner, John Harrison found time to make at least eight clocks between 1713 and 1730 which can be divided into two separate groups. All have wooden movements but the first three, dated 1713, 1715 and 1717, have a conventional brass escape wheel and steel pivots running in brass bushes. The success of these early clocks must have gained him something of a reputation as a maker of clocks because he was commissioned by Sir Charles Pelham of Brocklesby Park to make a clock for the stable turret about 1720. He set about this challenging task by constructing the movement and wheel train from wood, but on a much larger scale than his previous clocks. He anticipated the problems that could arise for a clock that was housed in an uninsulated building and which would have probably been damp at certain times of the year. He realized that steel pivots running in brass bushes would soon suffer from corrosion and so he used brass pivots running in lignum vitae; no doubt his work as a joiner had alerted him to the special oily characteristics of this hard wood. The escapement caused problems and, after installation, Harrison was called back to attend to the clock on a number of occasions because difficulties arose with the running that could be attributed to the design of the escapement. After many experiments John Harrison designed a new escapement, now known as 'grasshopper’ which will run successfully without lubrication.  At this time he appears to have made other alterations such as fitting roller pinions, with lignum vitae rollers, and anti-friction rollers.  All of these alterations seem to have been designed to allow the clock to run without lubrication thereby overcoming the inadequacies of the oil that was available at the time. The problems that Harrison encountered and overcame with this turret clock were to set him on the path of seeking to develop precision timekeeping which was to occupy him for the rest of his life. By the early 1720’s James Harrison (1704-1766), John’s younger brother, had started to take an active interest in the clocks being made by his brother and indeed his name appears on the surviving precision longcase clocks that were made from 1725 onwards.  It is possible that he assisted his brother in the manufacture of the Brocklesby Park clock since it is signed Harrison without a forename. Like his brother and father James was a skilled joiner but after 1725 seems to have concentrated on making three high-precision longcase clocks with his brother. After the Brocklesby Park clock was successfully completed John Harrison sought to make a smaller domestic clock which incorporated the various features that he had invented to improve the running of the turret clock. He completed the design of this first precision longcase clock by 1725 and proceeded to make it shortly afterwards, there followed a second clock dated 1727 and a third clock was completed by 1728. A fourth movement, probably never completed by the Harrison brothers, was finished by an unknown hand in the 19th century, original Harrison features had never been fitted or were later removed by the 19th century clockmaker.  This fourth clock was re-made in correct Harrison style in 1975 using clock three as a model. The longcase clocks kept such excellent time that John Harrison was encouraged to improve on what he had already achieved and thereby rise to the challenge of perfecting a precision timekeeper that could be used at sea. It seems that Harrison first heard of the Longitude Act in 1726 and shortly thereafter abandoned his work on domestic clocks to concentrate on working towards the manufacture of a precision sea clock. The longcase clock from the Time Museum is almost certainly the first longcase clock made by James and John Harrison and may be dated 1725/6. Neither it, nor clock no. 2 would have started life with a gridiron pendulum as Harrison did not invent that form of compensation until 1727/8. Clock no. 3, dated 1728, was probably the only clock to have been fitted originally with this type of pendulum. These longcase clocks are unique in design and immediately identifiable as coming from the Harrison workshop. The wooden frames are large and secured by twenty-two mortice-and-tenon joints which are glued together to increase rigidity. The dial is fitted directly on to the frame thereby dispensing with dial pillars. The construction of the wheels is remarkable; the main body of each wheel is slotted around the circumference and individual segments of oak teeth are set into the body to ensure that the grain is radial all round the wheel to give the greatest possible strength. The history of the three completed clocks is complex and it is remarkable that all three have survived to the present day. Clock no. 2, dated 1727, was sold by John Harrison and is now in a private collection. Clock no. 3, dated 1728, is now owned by the Clockmakers’ Company, London and can be seen in their museum. The first clock, included in this Time Museum sale, has had an eventful history. It was discovered in dilapidated condition by Colonel Quill in 1954; the dial and case had been overpainted in a pinkish brown color and the dial decorated in the Victorian manner. It is this clock that Harrison depended upon to test the first of his sea clocks and it seems it remained in the Harrison family for many years. Letters exist which refer to a Harrison regulator 'Clock no.1’ which James Harrison (died 1875) was repairing for its owner John Harrison (1761-1842). The repairs had not been completed at the time of John Harrison’s death in 1842 and in March of 1843 James Harrison wrote to John’s widow requesting payment for work that he had done. The history of the clock then becomes obscure and it is likely that it was sold out of the Harrison family. When Colonel Quill acquired the clock in 1954 from a Mr. Barton-King he learned that Mr. Barton-King’s father (Andrew King), who had been a journeyman to a Hull clockmaker, had found Harrison no. 1 in the cellar of an old inn in Hull by the name of the Old Malt Shovel circa 1861/5. Apparently it had lain there amongst a lot of debris for many years. It was subsequently restored, probably by Andrew King, since his grandson related to Colonel Quill in 1973 that he remembered, as a youth, seeing a Harrison clock movement in his grandfather’s workshop. From information gathered from a newspaper Colonel Quill tracked down the Harrison no. 1 longcase clock to a private address in Hull where it was being stored on behalf of its then owner Mr. Barton-King.  The clock was eventually purchased by Colonel Quill who took the movement back to his flat in London and delivered the case to C.A. Ilbert who agreed to store it in his house until restoration could be arranged. Ilbert died before the restoration was commenced and so the clock case was moved to the British Horological Institute in Clerkenwell and stored in their library. Considerable trouble was taken to restore the clock case and dial to as near what they must have been like originally. A full record of the restoration was made by Colonel Quill and is included with the clock in this sale. The clock was sold by Colonel Quill to Seth Atwood in 1980 and was exhibited in the Time Museum until it closed on March 12, 1999. See Quill, John Harrison: The Man Who Found Longitude, pp. 23-30, where the author discusses "The Precision Regulator Clocks of John and James Harrison". Also see p. 22, fig. 8, for an illustration of the present lot. To the best of our knowledge it would appear that the present precision longcase clock most likely represents the only known clock made by John Harrison to be offered in recent times at public auction.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-10-15
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