Sök efter mer än 80 miljoner sålda föremål i vår prisbank

1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Alloy Berlinetta Comp
Såld

Om föremålet

The Ex-Vittorio de Micheli and Prince of Lichtenstein\n\nEst. 300bhp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic longitudinal leaf springs on four trailing arms, coil springs to the independent wish bone front suspension with telescopic tubular shock absorbers all around and four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2400mm (94.5")\n\nGRAND TURISMO FERRARIS OF THE 1950s\n\nOnce Enzo Ferrari realized that the marques wealthy racing followers would purchase all the Grand Touring road cars that he could produce, this became the preferred method of financing his beloved racing team. In the past, sales of used racing cars and commercial sponsorships had generated funds, but not in a consistent, nor meaningfully voluminous manner.\n\nIn the 1949 to 1954 period only about 200 road cars left the factory while sales for the first “Series-Produced” GTs, the Boano and Ellena 250 GT models totaled some 150 units in their two and a half years of manufacture. After that, production more than doubled annually with as many as 670 cars sold in the 1964 calendar year. The mechanical specifications GT Ferraris in this glorious era were always based on the company’s current racing cars, a fact which was not lost on sporting motorists who coveted these thoroughbreds – even at the $10,975 US port-of-entry price.\n\nThis concept also made GT Ferraris an excellent customer racing car because of their dual-purpose personality. Seeing a niche market opportunity the factory built some 94 long wheelbase berlinettas – “The Tour de France” model was based on the Boano/Ellena chassis but with lightweight alloy bodies and slightly improved engine output. “Gentlemen drivers” loved them and virtually dominated European GT racing in the famed TdFs from 1957 to 1959; however, the TdF was only a precursor to the mighty Ferrari that was to follow – the ultimate and even more competitive dual purpose machine – the 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta.\n\nTHE FERRARI 250 GT SWB\n\nBy the late fifties it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose grand turismo automobile with his line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V-12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More important in racing, where it is said, “To finish first, you must first finish,” and in keeping with that all but too true statement the SWB was nothing short of reliable. That reliability also carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating very satisfied owners.\n\nFerrari, as astute at catering to clients varied desires as he was at creating winning race cars, was always willing to provide specialized variations on his series-produced cars to satisfy a whim – when the whim was backed by a heavy checkbook. These unique Ferraris are among the most prized by collectors and this particular example, chassis number 1757 GT, is one such model, being a rare alloy “competezione” version.\n\nIntroduced in 1959, the 250 GT Berlinetta was designed with three objectives: first, to be more aerodynamically efficient; second, to be as compact as possible; and third, to provide appropriate accommodations and luggage space for a true grand turismo automobile. In the process, Pininfarina and Scaglietti created one of the most beautiful automobiles of all time, a succinct, straightforward and purposeful blending of form following function that is pleasing from all aspects.\n\nSeven cars, known today as “Interim Berlinettas” were built on the 2600mm long wheelbase chassis before construction was shifted to the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis, a change deemed desirable to improve the cars’ responsiveness in cornering. Still called the 250 GT Berlinetta by Ferrari, its wheelbase has subsequently been firmly attached to the factories model designation to distinguish it from numerous other 250 GT models and the 2600mm chassis “Interim Berlinettas.”\n\nAs the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta it has established a reputation and following, second only to its successor, the illustrious 250 GTO. Pininfarina’s body design as executed by Scaglietti on the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis excels in all aspects. It is unmistakably Ferrari. It is devoid of superfluous bulk, features or embellishments. Essentially, it redefined the concept of aerodynamic. The driver’s visibility from the ample greenhouse is also excellent while the corners of the car are tightly wrapped around the wheels and its gently rounded masses speak unambiguously of potency and power.\n\nThe 250 GT SWB Berlinetta was immediately successful in racing and remained so until its place at the head of the GT pack was gradually assumed by the GTO. The list of competition successes is so long as to be pointless to recount in detail but included GT category wins at LeMans in 1960 and 1961, Tour de France wins in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and of course Stirling Moss’s pair of Goodwood Tourist Trophy wins in 1960 and 1961. Built in both steel and aluminum, only about 200 were made from 1959 to 1962. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is the last true dual purpose grand turismo built in quantity by Ferrari – or anyone else for that matter – and is in all respects a fitting milestone to mark the end of a legendary age.\n\nFERRARI SHORT WHEELBASE BERLINETTA – CHASSIS NO. 1757 GT\n\nThe 250 GT SWB was homologated by the F.I.A. on June 16, 1960, just in time for that year’s LeMans race which accounts for the fact that in races prior to this date, these Berlinettas were entered in the sports car category. In fact, the LeMans SWB attack began in 1960 as Tavano/Loustel’s Berlinetta won the GT class and finished 4th overall – 5th, 6th and 7th overall also being claimed by the SWB brigade! Certainly these drivers – Tavano, Loustel, Arents, Connell, Dernier, Noblet and Americans Ed Hugus and Augie Pabst (who finished 7th O/A in NART’s GT no. 1759) personified Enzo Ferrari’s “gentleman driver” demographic.\n\nMeanwhile in Italy, skilled amateur driver and faithful Ferrari customer Vittorio de Micheli took delivery of GT no. 1757, an alloy Competizione version, on May 11, 1960. It was painted in Rosso Corsa, as it is today as well, and featured rare early SWB series body details. Only 29 cars in this early series were built – all in aluminum and all configured in left hand drive. Number 1757, the SWB GT that RM Auctions is privileged to present here, was the 5th car in this early series. Vittorio de Micheli was by all accounts a very skilled driver since he managed to win over half of the hillclimbs and circuit races he contested in the 1960 to 1962 period. (Please see included competition record for specifics.)\n\nAfter two years of racing and spirited road use, de Micheli sold 1757 to the Prince of Lichtenstein who repainted the car in silver. Five years later Grand Garage Eskert in Windischbrugg, Switzerland passed the SWB to Larry Dent of Auburn, Indiana (1967). By 1969 it was with Ervin Williams of Hickory, North Carolina before going to Carl Reinhardt of Marietta, Georgia in 1971. Reinhardt retained 1757 for some15 years during which it was subjected to extensive restoration work, including a new alloy front body section fabricated by Robbie Robinson of Woodstock, Georgia.\n\nIn the fall of 1986 an agent for European Auto Sales of Costa Mesa, California inspected this car prior to purchase and reported that the original engine was stamped correctly and many trim pieces were also marked with the number 1757 and was fitted with the original riveted alloy gas tank and outside fuel filler. The transmission, it should be noted, had “gone missing” but a correct ribbed cage alloy gearbox from another car would be included in the sale to European Auto Sales. The car was subsequently sold to Kenji Sasamoto of Kawasaki, Japan in December, 1986. However, it remained in California for a full restoration by EAS before finally being air freighted to Japan one year later.\n\nSasamoto, a true motoring buff, surely Enzo Ferrari’s version of a Japanese “Gentleman Driver”, kept 1757 for more than 18 years before passing it through a California dealer to the present owner. An account of Kenji Sasamoto’s enthusiastic use of 1757 perhaps illustrates best the oft-used “dual-purpose” phrase in connection with these Ferrari SWB cars. It shows participation in many concours in Japan, racing at Monterey in 1995 during the Ferrari feature marque year, the 1996 Tour de France and the Monterey Historics again as well as the 1997 Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Track-Day and Saturday Concours.\n\nCertainly no “garage queen” this Short Wheelbase Berlinetta was also raced and shown by its current owner at the 2006 Cavallino Classic. Additionally, the Ferrari is complete with the original quick-change jack as well as a brand new custom made fuel cell currently awaiting installation. The owner reports a comprehensive dossier will accompany the car in its sale and includes photos of the restoration and original FIA papers. Most recently, a full mechanical inspection was executed and included a compression check and leak-down test and the results displaying nothing short of perfection.\n\nThe SWB is eligible for every important motoring event on the planet, will never be denied entry into any Ferrari club event and will out perform nearly everything in its class with ease at the hands of a skilled driver. Sensational looks coupled with an unsurpassed driving dynamic as well as a definite blue-chip investment for future appreciation, this rare Ferrari auction offering is most worthy of a purchase consideration.\n\nChassis no. 1757GT
US
MA, US
US

chassis

Chassis no. 1757GT


*Vänligen notera att att priset inte är omräknat till dagens värde, utan avser slutpriset vid tidpunkten när föremålet såldes.

*Vänligen notera att att priset inte är omräknat till dagens värde, utan avser slutpriset vid tidpunkten när föremålet såldes.


Annons
Annons