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A large bamboo, rattan and lacquer cabinet designed as a priest’s backpack (oi)
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Om föremålet

A LARGE BAMBOO, RATTAN AND LACQUER CABINET DESIGNED AS A PRIEST’S BACKPACK (OI)\n\nMEIJI PERIOD (DATED 1911), SIGNED HOSAI SAKU KORE [IIZUKA KIKUJI; HOSAI II (1872-1934)]\n\nPlaited in a herringbone pattern in the form of the backpack used by mountain ascetic priests when traveling, with hinged doors and interior fitted with removable shelf and floor lacquered in red and black, side walls and ceiling later lined with gold paper; accompanied by a small lacquered bamboo and rattan footed stand and miniature woven knot suggestive of a paperweight; signed and cyclically dated on back leg Tame Kondo kun (For Mr. Kondo) Kanoto-i shoto  (Meiji 44; 1911, early winter) Hosai saku kore (Hosai made this)\n\n33 1/8 x 22 7/8 x 20 ½ deep in. (84 x 58 x 52 deep cm)
GB
GB
GB

notes

At the Tokyo Taisho Exhibition (Tokyo Taisho hakurankai) in 1914, the artist who made this cabinet received the Silver Medal for a bamboo “Monk’s Backpack” (Oi) and three baskets. The Japanese government sponsored the artist’s submission of an “Oi-form Cabinet” (Oigatakikyoku ????) for the accoutrements of sencha brewed-tea practice that earned Hosai II an honorable mention in the 1925 Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratives et Industriels Modernes.

Iizuka Hosai II was the eldest son of the bamboo maker Iizuka Hosai I (Hoo; 1851–1916) of Tochigi Prefecture. In 1910, Hosai II left the countryside for Tokyo, where he regularly participated in exhibitions, helping pave the way for successive generations, including his younger brother, the renowned Rokansai (1890–1958), and Hosai II’s nephew, “Living National Treasure” Iizuka Shokansai (1919–2004), to be recognized as artists in bamboo, not as industrial artisans. Rokansai and Hosai II were instrumental in the founding of the Wood and Bamboo Craft Society (Nihon Kogei Bijutsu Kai) to promote the acceptance of bamboo artists in the national exhibitions restricted to painters and sculptors.

Though trained in the classical style of “Chinese things” (karamono), Hosai II moved in a more individual direction by producing objects more specific to Japan, such as the inventive backpack cabinet here. Also evident is his mastery of plaiting, especially the herringbone pattern created by the technique of twill plaiting in which strips of material cross in opposite directions.

origin

MEIJI PERIOD (DATED 1911), SIGNED HOSAI SAKU KORE [IIZUKA KIKUJI; HOSAI II (1872-1934)]

lot_number

80


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*Vänligen notera att att priset inte är omräknat till dagens värde, utan avser slutpriset vid tidpunkten när föremålet såldes.


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