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A rare and unusual pair of regency terrestrial and celestial library
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On the original brass-mounted green-japanned and parcel-gilt stands, dated 1807, the cartouches printed with: GLOBUS CŒLESTIS quo exhibetur Cœlum Sydereum: juxta Observationes Astronomorum recentiorum quantum fieri potuit accurate descriptus. In hoc Stellæ ultra bis mille plures quam in quovis e Globis prioribus reperiuntur: Asterismiautem ad mentem Veterum delineantur. In Annum 1740. Opera Johannis Senex R. S. S. The CELESTIAL GLOBE On which the True Face of the Heavens is delineated; & the Constellations containing upwards of 2000 Stars more than are on any former Globes, are laid down from the most recent & Accurate Observations of Astronomers and Adjusted to the Year 1740. by Jon. SENEX. F. R. S.  Now made & Sold by D. ADAMS only with all the latest discoveries   West side of Charing Cross London  1807. GLOBUS TERR-AQUEUS omnes Regiones hactenus exploratas exhibens, secundum nuperas Observatio nes Astronomicas et Navigantium ac Itinerantium fide digniorum relations confectus OPERA JOHAN :  SENEX, R. R. S. A new & most correct GLOBE OF THE EARTH, laid down from the latest observations of the most Judicious Astronomers, Navigators & Travellers By JOS : SENEX  F. R. S. New made & Sold by Dudley Adams only Mathematical Instrument Maker to His MAJESTY and Optician to His Royal Highness the PRINCE OF WALES.  No. 60 Fleet Street, LONDON, 1807. Together with George Adams, Sen. A TREATISE, DESCRIBING THE CONSTRUCTION AND EXPLAINING THE USE OF NEW CELESTIAL AND TERRESTRIAL GLOBES Published by Dudley Adams, London, 1810 With the engraved book-plate of Lord Kenyon depicting his arms, and with the signature of his daughter ‘M E Kenyon 1811’, bound in contemporary mottled calf, the spine inscribed ‘ADAMS ON THE GLOBES’.\nThe purchase of this pair of globes is recorded in the diary of George, 2nd Lord Kenyon (1776-1855) for the week of the 18th to the 24th of November 1811, the entry reading : 'Dr(af)t Hoares to Dudley Adams, Globes - £93.6.0.’ Kenyon was a lawyer, the second son of Lloyd Kenyon. 1st Baron Kenyon, sometime master of the rolls and chief justice of England. The globes were presumably delivered to Gredington after May 11 of that year as a piece of paper, used for balancing the main wheel of the terrestrial globe, was discovered whilst it was being cleaned; dated May 11, 1811, it was a circular from the Commercial Hall Wine company offering ‘superior quality Wines of the finest flavour’. In Dudley Adam’s price list, which was published in 1810, the price of globes of this size was £50, the price paid by Lord Kenyon for the present pair indicating that they were possibly a special commission, the difference being accounted for by their unusual japanned and parcel-gilt stands.\nTerrestrial and celestial globes were necessary furnishings for a gentleman’s library in England from the 17th century, their accuracy being constantly improved during the 18th century through the voyages of explorers such as Captain Cook and other navigators. The GLOBUS TERR-AQUEUS and GLOBUS CŒLESTUS are both signed by John Senex, the latter being dated 1740. Senex (fl. 1695-1740), was an engraver and map seller in London whose actual date of birth is not known, although he was possibly the son of John Senex, a gentleman of Ludlow, Salop. Apprenticed to Robert Clavell on July 1st 1695 he became a freeman of the Stationer’s Company in 1705/6. His first partnership was with Charles Price, the latter joining John Willdey in 1710, Senex moving to the sign of the Globe in Salisbury Court where he remained in partnership with John Maxwell until 1721. Sometime before 1724 he moved to an address opposite St. Dunstan’s Church in Fleet Street, becoming a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1728, reading a short paper to the Society in 1738. After his death in 1740, his widow continued to publish his globes, but in 1757 his copper plates were purchased from her by James Ferguson. They then came into the possession of James Martin, after whose death they became the property of Dudley Adams.\nAdams (1762-1830), was the son of George Adams (1709-72) with whom he worked until his death, then continuing independently at 53 Charing Cross, returning to 60 Fleet Street in 1796 until his bankruptcy in 1817. From 1793 until 1807 he is recorded as reissuing Senex’s 27 inch globes as in the present examples (Dekker, op. cit.).\nThe stands for these globes are particularly unusual as globes of this period and size were normally supported on turned legs of mahogany, rosewood or occasionally satinwood, or on tripod stands with ‘compass’ form legs. The decoration of the present stands with their dark bronze-green japanning and parcel gilt decoration, together with their unusual height, possibly indicates a special commission.\nSee:\nGloria Clifton, Directory of British Scientific Instrument Makers 1550-1851, 1995\nElly Dekker, Globes at Greenwhich, 1999, pp. 245 and 489-490
US
NY, US
US

dimensions

Height 5 ft. 3 in.; diameter 34 in.

provenance

George, 2nd Lord Kenyon (1776-1855), Gredington Hall, Hanmer, Co. Flint Pelham Galleries, Ltd., London Partridge Fine Arts, London Acquired from the above, 1981


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*Vänligen notera att att priset inte är omräknat till dagens värde, utan avser slutpriset vid tidpunkten när föremålet såldes.


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