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FITZGERALD, F. Scott. Tender is the Night. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934.
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FITZGERALD, F. Scott. Tender is the Night. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934.\n\n8o. Original green cloth, gilt-lettered on spine; dust jacket (slightest edgewear, otherwise particularly fine and bright). Provenance: DONALD OGDEN STEWART (1894-1980), actor, humorist, film writer (presentation inscription).\n\nFIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING. A VERY FINE ASSOCIATION COPY, INSCRIBED BY FITZGERALD TO DONALD OGDEN STEWART on the front free endpaper: "Dear Don: This will amuse you I think Scott." Fitzgerald met Stewart in 1919, in Fitzgerald's home town of St. Paul, Minnesota, where Stewart was working for AT&T after graduating from Yale. In his autobiography years later, he described the early days of their friendship:\n\n"And then, as though on cue, there arrived shortly after a young, blond, good-looking Princeton graduate named Francis Scott Fitzgerald. Kay Tighe had said 'You'll like Scott'--and I did. He had just come up from Montgomery, Alabama, where he had been unsuccessfully trying to get Zelda Sayre to marry him. I told him about Diana and we became commiserating 'rejects' under the skin. He still had hopes, however, of getting somewhere with his girl... I got him to lend me his cardboard box full of This Side of Paradise [the manuscript], written in pencil. I approved of it, with my Yale reservations. I didn't know enough to appreciate his style and form, but the content was exciting.\n\n"...I was lucky with Scott, because I first knew him intimately in that comparatively calm period before he sky-rocketed as a novelist to somewhat unapproachable heights. He and I had one thing in common: we were both impoverished and ambitious 'outsiders.' I think that he was almost as obsessed as I with the magic of great names, both in Finance and Society. We were both products of Eastern upper class universities, and both insecure and unprepared for sudden success. My 1920s and 1930s were, on a smaller scale, the Fitzgerald 1920s and 1930s..." (By a Stroke of Luck! An Autobiography, London, 1975, pp. 86-88).\n\nStewart was a member of the entourage that made the famous journey of 'The Lost Generation'--the trip in 1924 to Pamplona for the festival of the running of the bulls organized by Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway incorporated Stewart into The Sun Also Rises as the character Bill Groton. In 1935, Fitzgerald was instrumental in launching Stewart's literary career by introducing him to his Princeton classmates Edmund Wilson and John Peale Bishop at Vanity Fair.\n\nFitzgerald and Stewart remained in touch until Fitzgerald's final years, drifting apart in the late 1930s over Stewart's leftist leanings. At the time of Fitzgerald's death in 1940, Stewart was working in Hollywood, but after a hightly successful career (he won the Academy Award for his screenplay for The Philadelphia Story) he was blacklisted and driven into exile in London during the McCarthy hysteria. Bruccoli A15.1.a; Connolly, The Modern Movement 79.
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FITZGERALD, F. Scott. Tender is the Night. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934.

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FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING. A VERY FINE ASSOCIATION COPY, INSCRIBED BY FITZGERALD TO DONALD OGDEN STEWART on the front free endpaper: "Dear Don: This will amuse you I think Scott." Fitzgerald met Stewart in 1919, in Fitzgerald's home town of St. Paul, Minnesota, where Stewart was working for AT&T after graduating from Yale. In his autobiography years later, he described the early days of their friendship:

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FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING. A VERY FINE ASSOCIATION COPY, INSCRIBED BY FITZGERALD TO DONALD OGDEN STEWART on the front free endpaper: "Dear Don: This will amuse you I think Scott." Fitzgerald met Stewart in 1919, in Fitzgerald's home town of St. Paul, Minnesota, where Stewart was working for AT&T after graduating from Yale. In his autobiography years later, he described the early days of their friendship: "...I was lucky with Scott, because I first knew him intimately in that comparatively calm period before he sky-rocketed as a novelist to somewhat unapproachable heights. He and I had one thing in common: we were both impoverished and ambitious 'outsiders.' I think that he was almost as obsessed as I with the magic of great names, both in Finance and Society. We were both products of Eastern upper class universities, and both insecure and unprepared for sudden success. My 1920s and 1930s were, on a smaller scale, the Fitzgerald 1920s and 1930s..." (By a Stroke of Luck! An Autobiography, London, 1975, pp. 86-88).


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