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From line No. 800152
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From line No. 800152
Såld

From line No. 800152

US
NY, US
US

Om föremålet

Lee Ufan\noil and mineral pigment on canvas\nPainted in 1980.\n\nA quintessential example of Lee Ufan’s iconic From line series that was acquired directly from the artist, From line No. 800152 offers the viewer a meditative and wholly immersive experience. Executed in 1980, the monumental composition epitomizes the systematic, almost ritualistic, method of painting that Lee, the key theorist of the Mono-ha movement developed in Tokyo in the mid-1960s, pioneered with this series between 1973 and 1984. Each work in the From line series is created with the same dual pro-cess of action and structure, strict choice of material, and an awareness of breath and bodily stance. Working with the canvas laid on the ground, Lee loads a round-tipped paint-brush with a combination of powdered cobalt blue pigment and carefully pulls it with the full weight of his body vertically across the expansive canvas. Following the strict philosophic prin-ciple of ikkaisei (irreversibility) of the Japanese ink-painting tradition, Lee succes-sively sweeps his brush in a single breath without layering or modification as he moves from left to right across the canvas. In this synchronized and controlled process of painting, Lee intention-ally allows for the gradual unloading of the pigment towards the bottom of the canvas – resulting in a cascading blue veil that dissipates into near nothingness.It is through the meditative act of repetition that Lee seeks to formally express a concept of infinity. From line No. 800152 perfectly epitomizes Lee’s dictum: “A line must have a beginning and an end. Space appears within the passage of time and when the process of creating spaces comes to an end, time also vanishes” (Lee Ufan, quoted in “Lee Ufan: From line”, Tate, online). As a temporal record of continual repetition – rather than a conven-tional spatial composition – From line No. 800152 invites the viewer to meditate on the perpetual passing of time. "The object before the eyes and the image in the mind are all constructed of points and lines, expressed in rhythm with the rising and falling of the breath. Because of this, the viewer…can observe the dynamic relationship between the painting and the canvas, the condition of the painter’s body, the movement of his heart, his character, and the atmosphere of the age” (Lee Ufan, quoted in "Using a Brush”, 1975, in The Art of En-counter, London, 2008). Viewing the repetitive yet distinct brushstrokes in From line No. 800152 as they traverse the canvas and coalesce into a larger unified whole, we are encouraged to view time as a process of continual becoming.
US
NY, US
US

text

A quintessential example of Lee Ufan&rsquo;s iconic <em>From line</em> series that was acquired directly from the artist, <em>From line No. 800152</em> offers the viewer a meditative and wholly immersive experience. Executed in 1980, the monumental composition epitomizes the systematic, almost ritualistic, method of painting that Lee, the key theorist of the <em>Mono-ha</em> movement developed in Tokyo in the mid-1960s, pioneered with this series between 1973 and 1984. Each work in the <em>From line</em> series is created with the same dual pro-cess of action and structure, strict choice of material, and an awareness of breath and bodily stance. Working with the canvas laid on the ground, Lee<em> </em>loads a round-tipped paint-brush with a combination of powdered cobalt blue pigment and carefully pulls it with the full weight of his body vertically across the expansive canvas. Following the strict philosophic prin-ciple of <em>ikkaisei</em> (irreversibility) of the Japanese ink-painting tradition, Lee succes-sively sweeps his brush in a single breath without layering or modification as he moves from left to right across the canvas. In this synchronized and controlled process of painting, Lee intention-ally allows for the gradual unloading of the pigment towards the bottom of the canvas &ndash; resulting in a cascading blue veil that dissipates into near nothingness.<br /><br />It is through the meditative act of repetition that Lee seeks to formally express a concept of infinity. <em>From line No. 800152</em> perfectly epitomizes Lee&rsquo;s dictum: &ldquo;A line must have a beginning and an end. Space appears within the passage of time and when the process of creating spaces comes to an end, time also vanishes&rdquo; (Lee Ufan, quoted in &ldquo;Lee Ufan: From line&rdquo;, <em>Tate</em>, online). As a temporal record of continual repetition &ndash; rather than a conven-tional spatial composition &ndash; <em>From line No. 800152</em> invites the viewer to meditate on the perpetual passing of time. <em>"</em>The object before the eyes and the image in the mind are all constructed of points and lines, expressed in rhythm with the rising and falling of the breath. Because of this, the viewer&hellip;can observe the dynamic relationship between the painting and the canvas, the condition of the painter&rsquo;s body, the movement of his heart, his character, and the atmosphere of the age&rdquo; (Lee Ufan, quoted in "Using a Brush&rdquo;, 1975, in<em> The Art of En-counter,</em> London, 2008). Viewing the repetitive yet distinct brushstrokes in<em> From line No. 800152 </em>as they traverse the canvas and coalesce into a larger unified whole, we are encouraged to view time as a process of continual becoming.

maker

Lee Ufan

medium

oil and mineral pigment on canvas

makerId

6973

condition

This work is in very good condition. The canvas, stretcher and attachments appear to be in generally good condition. There is a small loss to the extreme upper left corner. There are a few minor scuffs to the extreme edges, primarily to the lower left corner. When examined under ultra-violet light there is no indication of inpainting. Please note the provenance for this work is the eminent Korean sculptor and ceramic artist, Young Sook Park, who acquired the work directly from the artist in 1991. Frequent collaborators, Young Sook Park and Lee Ufan began working together in 1980s.

extraInfo

<a href="mailto:aloiacono@phillips.com">Amanda Lo Iacono</a><br /> Head of Evening Sale<br /> New York<br /> +1 212 940 1278<br /> <a href="mailto:aloiacono@phillips.com">aloiacono@phillips.com</a><br />

dimensions

51 x 63 7/8 in. (129.5 x 162.2 cm.)

provenance

Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

objectNumber

111217

lotNumberFull

40


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*Vänligen notera att att priset inte är omräknat till dagens värde, utan avser slutpriset vid tidpunkten när föremålet såldes.


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