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*THE MOST FAMOUS FOX SHOTGUN IN THE WORLD
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SN 31088. Cal 12 ga. One-of-a-Kind Super-Fox with 32" Chromox steel bbls with matted concave tapered rib, brass front and small ivory center sighting bead located 10" from the breech end, choked FULL/FULL with 3" chambers, ejectors and dbl triggers. Bbls are hand-stamped on right side "MADE FOR NASH BUCKINGHAM", left bbl is marked "BY BURT BECKER PHILA.PA". Frame is engraved in a typical "X"-grade patterns with full coverage bold leafy scroll. It has the vignette of 2 ducks in flight and "ANSLEY H. FOX" arching over the top on left side, the vignette of two quail in flight on right side with "ANSLEY H. FOX" engraved in an arch over the top. Bottom of frame is engraved with the large vignette of a fox in a field scene. Top lever, top tang, trigger bow & long lower tang are engraved to match. Underside of lower tang is stamped "31088". This shotgun was specifically ordered and produced without a safety. Mounted with nicely figured walnut with checkered forearm and straight stock with checkered side panels and multi-point checkered straight grip, 14-1/4" to a checkered butt. Forearm has an ivory schnable tip insert. Forearm latch and exposed forearm metal are engraved to match receiver. The stock mounted on this shotgun is a recent, faithful copy of the broken and crudely repaired stock that was on the gun at the time of discovery. Bore diameter: left -.739, right -.739. Bore restrictions: left -.047, right -.047. Wall thickness: left -.035, right -.037. Drop at heel: 2-5/16", drop at comb: 1-3/16". Weight: 9lbs. LOP 14-5/16". Accompanied by a J.T. Callahan Letter identifying this shotgun as HE Special, 12 ga., 32" choked FULL/FULL 85%, stock 14-1/4", 1-1/2x2" (specified) finished 2-1/8", weight 9lbs, 8oz. to 9lbs 12oz. (specified), finished at 9lbs 9oz. Under notes: slender straight grip, 1/2 oval 4-3/4", Hy Gain recoil pad, XE grade style stock & forearm, XE engraving, full round comb, pitch 2", castoff 1/4", (from factory records) chambered for 3" shells for #4 chilled shot, largest ivory front sight, small ivory rear sight 10" from breech, the shotgun was shipped from the Fox Philadelphia PA factory on July 15, 1927. The orig consignee is listed to be "Nash Buckingham". Super-Fox shotguns were introduced about 1923 and continued in production with the A.H. Fox Gun Co. until 1929 and then appeared in the Savage-Fox catalogs of 1930-1942. According to the book A.H. Fox, The Finest Gun in the World, McIntosh, these Super-Fox shotguns, while outwardly having the appearance of a standard 12 gauge, were actually a completely unique model although were mechanically identical to other Fox shotguns. The frame is about 1/16" larger all around than a standard 12 bore frame and could weigh as much as 9-3/4 lbs. He also states that only 30" and 32" bbls were available. Many if not all, of the Super-Fox shotguns were bored personally by Burt Becker who was a very skilled gunsmith, who having apprenticed under renowned shotgun manufacturer Dan Lefever and others, eventually moving to Philadelphia and began working for the A.H. Fox Gun Company in about 1915. Becker had spent a lot of time studying shotgun bbls and chokes and according to Buckingham was the finest bbl man in the world. Mr. Becker, in collaboration with Charles Askins, bored & tested many bbls to refine their design which consisted of over-boring the bore with a longer, tapered chamber and gradually tapering forcing cone and choke which served to control the patterns to the effect that he was able to produce a very tight dispersion of 80-90% of the pellets in a 30" circle at 40 yds. In about 1921 John Olin was testing his new 3" ammunition and the best of the shotguns he tested was a Becker-bored Fox 12 gauge. Mr. Olin sent this shotgun and eight boxes of his new unmarked ammunition to an old friend in Memphis to test on ducks and geese, Nash Buckingham. Buckingham was so impressed with the performance of that gun that he immediately abandoned his 34" Parker and the old style of ammunition in favor of the Fox (Reference the above publication). According to the referenced publication, in 1926 Buckingham commissioned a 12 gauge Super-Fox waterfowl gun. He specified that the bbls be bored by Burt Becker, chambered for 3" shells and regulated it for the new Super-X load of 4 drams powder & 1-3/8 oz. of #4 copper clad shot. This gun frequently was written about by Nash in various articles and thus became familiar to the vast readership of Buckingham, eventually making it one of the most famous shotguns in the world and certainly the most famous Fox shotgun ever built. According to the referenced publication the finished gun weighed just under 10 lbs. and when it left the factory both bbls would place 90% of the shot charge into a 30" circle at 40 yards. Becker then stamped Nash Buckingham's name on one bbl and his own name on the other. Nash's close friend, hunting companion and outdoor writer Harold Sheldon, nicknamed the great shotgun "Bo-Whoop" (in reference to the thunderous sound it made each time Nash shot it). Buckingham's fame continued to grow as a sport and writer when on Dec. 1, 1948, after a morning of duck shooting near Clarendon, Arkansas, he and Cliff Green were stopped by game wardens for a license check. Reportedly one of the wardens placed "Bo-Whoop", in its case, on the fender of Green's car. The shotgun was forgotten about and left on the fender as they drove away, falling off into oblivion sometime later. "Bo-Whoop" was lost. However "Bo-Whoop" really wasn't lost, just no one knew exactly where it was, that is until the late 1950's or early 1960's when, according to a notarized affidavit from the consignor, his Grandfather purchased this shotgun with a broken stock from an unnamed man for $50 (the man was asking $100). The broken shotgun remained in his Grandfather's closet until his death in 1991 and was passed on to the consignor's Father. It remained in storage for the next 14 years. In 2005, the Father decided it was time to have the gun properly repaired. He took it to Jim Kelly of Darlington, SC who informed the Father of the shotgun's history, Nash Buckingham, and how famous both shotgun and man were. Kelly faithfully recreated the broken stock in about a year and the shotgun went back into storage. In January 2009 the shotgun was handed down to the consignor who, now aware of the shotgun's history and fame, has decided to allow it to be sold to someone who will appreciate it for what it is and honor the memory of Nash Buckingham and the legend of "Bo-Whoop". While Nash's loss of "Bo-Whoop" was a considerable personal loss, at least it was not a financial loss; Buckingham received a cash settlement from his insurance company for its loss. A final chapter in the long and drawn out history of Bo-Whoop appears in Buckingham's book Letters to John Bailey where on p. 37 in a letter dated Dec. 2,1948, he details the loss of "Bo-Whoop". "I feel like I did when Chubby died. It's fully insured but I'll never get another friend like that gun." Chubby was Nash's loyal and beloved Spaniel. In July 1950, Barry Brooks and George Warner, friends of Buckingham, conspired to replace Bo-Whoop. They contacted Burt Becker, who was now 80 years old to make another gun ("Bo-Whoop II"). That shotgun was completed by or under the direct supervision of Mr. Becker at a cost of $750 and bears the SN 121, which is in Mr. Becker's own serial range. Mr. Buckingham used Bo-Whoop II until 1968 when he was 88 years old, when age had made it impossible for him to use this heavy old shotgun so he sold it to his friend Dr. William Andrews of Memphis, TN. This gun is now on display at the national Duck's Unlimited headquarters. One last point of interest regarding the serial number of "Bo-Whoop". After the time of loss, Nash incorrectly referenced the serial number of his lost gun as #31108. "Bo-Whoop's" correct serial number is 31088 which is of course found on this gun. A search of the Fox records for SN 31108 discloses that that serial number belongs to an A-grade Fox 12 gauge with 30" bbls, nothing even close to a Super-Fox. Fox records for serial number 31088 conclusively describes our gun here and thus unquestionably lays to rest any question of authenticity. Given the proximity of the resurfacing of this venerable old shotgun, with its authentic markings and rock solid provenance and factory letter, there can be no doubt that what was once lost is now found. This, undoubtedly, is a once in a lifetime opportunity to own the most famous Fox shotgun in the world. As explained above the gun has no question of title. Because the insurance company settled, Nash's descendants no longer have any possible ownership. In regards to the Insurance Co (if it still is in existence) there is no practical way a claim could be made 60 years later ad even if it was, they could only recover their original settlement (which was probably $500-$700) For these and many other reasons James D. Julia will guarantee clear title to the buyer of the gun now and in the future. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbls retain orig blue thinning to brown over chamber areas with minor nicks & dings. Receiver retains case colors in sheltered areas having mostly faded to silver. The new stock is crisp & clean and retains about all of its wonderful custom finish. Orig forearm shows heavy wear with several compression creases at receiver end and retains a lovely hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp with strong ejectors, bright shiny bores. Accompanying stock shows the obvious repaired break through the wrist with moderate to heavy wear on checkering and numerous light nicks, dings & scratches with a very worn heel and overall retains a dark hand worn patina. 4-39178
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*Vänligen notera att att priset inte är omräknat till dagens värde, utan avser slutpriset vid tidpunkten när föremålet såldes.


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