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``la machine d'argent'' for the duke of mecklenburg-schwerin, françois-thomas

The serpentine rectangular base raised on four shell and scroll supports flanked by spreading matted foliage, supporting a still-life composed of game and vegetables as follows:            A rabbit, lying on its side            An ortolan, on its back with one spread wing and crossed feet            A snipe, on its back with spread wings and extended beak            A cauliflower, raised on its stalk with raggedly trimmed leaves            An onion            A mushroom            A gherkin            A truffle            A morel            A mushroom stalk            A turnip surrounded by six leafy plants, one flowered, another berried, on a rockwork surface,  all superbly cast and realistically chased with finely detailed fur, ruffled and smooth feathers, and tooled, matted and burnished surfaces according to nature, set off by the highly polished plain bold molding of the base A full account of the order, creation and delivery through Jean-Baptiste Oudry appears in the preceding article (pp. 1-17)  This also outlines the disappearence of La Machine d'Argent for so many years and its recent discovery. See the following pages for biographical notes on the silversmith François-Thomas Germain (pp. 33-37) and the painter Jean-Baptiste Oudry (pp. 48-53), and a history of the Dukes and Grand Dukes of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (pp.  54-59). Signature, engraved underneath on base rim, cauliflower side: F. T. GERMAIN . SCULPTEUR ORFEVRE DU ROY FECIT. 1754 A PARIS Scratch weight in German (underneath, on base rim opposite signature) 22 m[ark] // 7 L[o]th Marks: Underneath base on rabbit side, above molding: FTG with golden fleece, below two grains and crowned fleur-de-lys: maker’s mark of François-Thomas Germain Cow’s head: charge mark for Paris 1750-56 (fermier Julien Berthe) Crowned O: date letter or poinçon de la maison commune for 13 July 1754-12 July 1755 On outside base molding, below rabbit: Small cow: discharge mark on works intended for export, c.1733 - 1775

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-05-20
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A german parcel-gilt silver drinking cup in the form of the sixty-six

Realistically cast and chased, the head detachable, collared with foil-backed table cut diamonds forming the inscription FRIDERICUS III C(URFURST) Z(U) B(RANDENBURG), on a simulated forest floor, with applied oak leaves and  detachable foot embossed and chased with acanthus, the latter inscribed and dated 1696, with a gilt jesso base, late 19th century Unlike the majority of animal drinking cups of the 17th century, this stag represents a real creature. It was an extraordinary specimen with 66 points to its antlers and shot by Friedrich III Elector of Brandenburg (1657-1713), on September 18th 1696, near the village of Sauen, in the district of Briesen, just to the west of Frankfurt-an-der-Oder. Because of the animals size, its antlers, and because it was shot by the elector himself, the event caught the imagination; the site was marked at the time with a stone monument which still exists, it was mentioned in chronicles, and paintings and prints of the animal were made. An example of the latter was executed by the Brandenburg court artist Johann Georg Wolfgang (1662-1744) (see detail). Wolfgang recorded important court events including the anointing of Friedrich III, at his coronation as Friedrich I, King in Prussia in 1701, and the successful casting of a massive cannon. In the latter engraving (see detail) the caster, Johannes Jacobi (1661-1726) is shown leaning on the cannon and pointing to the equestrian statue of Friedrich IIIs father, The Great Elector, which he cast and which was modelled by Andreas Schlüter (1661-1714) It is thought that Andreas Schlüter (1664-1714), sculptor, architect and master of works to the electoral and royal court of Brandenburg/Prussia 'provided a design or modello of the Resting Deer for the Goldsmith.1 Schlüters hand in the making of the stag seems very likely given his employment as court sculptor from 1694 and the great importance of the animal to his employer the elector. It also occurred when his energies as a sculptor were not distracted by other duties, which in 1698 'were extended to include those of head architect on the Berlin Arsenal and shortly thereafter on the Electoral and subsequently Royal Stadtschloss renovation project as Ober-Baudirektor for palace contruction'; Additionally, the stone monument in Biegen erected to locate and remember the event of 18th September 1696, is also ascribed to Schlüter and bears an identical inscription to the one on the base of the stag. The silver model is struck with the mark of Daniel Männlich (1625-1701) elder of the Berlin Goldsmiths guild from 1671 and official goldsmith to the electoral court from around 1676. Born in Troppau, Silesia he came from an important family of goldsmiths which included a number of Augsburg masters. He was apprenticed to his uncle after his fathers early death and completed his studies as a journeyman in Krakow, Breslau and Dresden, before moving to Berlin. It is thought that the professional relationship between Daniel Männlich and Andreas Schlüter may have begun with their collaboration over the electors stag. It culminated with the portal to the Männlich family burial vault of 1700. Modelled by Schlüter, it is considered one of his greatest achievements and is the `only known commission the sculptor executed for a Berlin middle-class patron.2 The inscription under the foot of the cup is reputed to be the words dictated by the Elector in his tent, on the day the deer was shot and recorded in an eye-witness account published in the local chronicle of Briesen in the Amt Odervorland.3 ''Andere Fürstenhauser warden mich beneiden und Brandenburg erfährt Anerkennung und Friedrich stand auf und rief seinen Schreiber. Dann diktierte er folgenden Text (``Other princely houses will envy me and give recognition to Brandenburg. Friedrich stood and dictated the following text) Diesen Hirsch hat in der Brunfft Zeit, mit Eigener Hand geschoßen der Durchlauchtigste Gross Mächtigste Fürst und Herr HERR FRIDERICH der DRITTE, Marg Graff und Chur-Fürst zu Bran:denburg: Im Ambte Biegen auff der Jacobsdorff Heÿde, Den 18 Septembr. Ao:1696. Hatgewogen 5 Centn: 35 lb Nachdem er Schon 3Wochengeschrÿen.4 The vivid account by Bartholmäus Fritsch, a local woodsman, records the excitement when the Elector and his court descended on the Jacobsdorfer Heide, to find the stag whose reputation had reached Berlin. It undoubtedly had extraordinary antlers but in the eyes of the people who made their living in the sacred forests, the animal was also supernatural; it was accompanied by a white lady or forest fairy on a white horse, and only the Elector was sufficiently noble to kill such a beast. The deer was shot on 18th September after two days of stalking, and Andreas Siebenbürger, the stalker who carried the electors gun received a farm in thanks. A contemporary engraved plate from the gun, formerly in Hohenzollern Museum at Schloss Monbijou, shows the animal lying down as it is modelled in the silver-gilt cup.5 The antlers are now at Schloss Moritzburg in Saxony. They were given by the elector Friedrichs son Friedrich Wilhelm I (1688-1740), to Augustus II the Strong, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, on his visit to Brandenburg in 1728. As part of the celebrations for the visit, a hunt was organised in the Jungfern Heide near Charlotteburg on 11 June, and at the dinner afterwards, the official welcome toast to Augustus the Strong was drunk from this cup;6 it had become the hunt welcome cup and is recorded two years later passing from the deceased head huntmaster Oberjägermeister Samuel von Hertefeld to Oberjägermeister Georg Christoph Graf von Schlieben (1676-1748). Prints and other contemporary references consistently mention two things about the stag; that it was shot by the elector and that it had 66-points, an extraordinary number for a red deer. There is no doubt that the antlers were considered to be highly valuable, not least by Augustus himself. A note by the Prussian Vize-Oberjägermeister, von Meyrink in 1746 recorded that Friedrich Wilhelm exchanged the antlers with Augustus for a company of tall Grenadiers.7 Friedrich Wilhelms obsession for tall soldiers is well recorded and a precedent for such gift-giving existed when 151 Chinese lidded vases against 600 dragoons were exchanged by the two monarchs in 1717.8 After 1730, when the cup is recorded passing between officers of the royal hunt, no mention of it is found until 1902, when it was acquired by Wilhelm II, The German Emperor and descendent of Friedrich I and Friedrich Wilhelm.9 There is no published record of the details of this acquisition or why it was no longer a family possession, although it has been suggested that the cup somehow disappeared from its presumed then location in the department of the Royal hunt around 1822, at the dissolution of the Oberjägermeisteramtes.10 The stag cup was located in vitrine no. 8 of the Emperors Emfangzimmer of the Berlin Stadtschloss, the former Audienzzimmer of Freidrich II (Frederick the Great) and is recorded in a document of 18th August 1914, being moved perhaps to a safer location, soon after the outbreak of the Great War. Around 1926, the cup was moved from Berlin to Huis Doorn, in the Netherlands, a house the emperor had bought in 1919 for his Residence in exile. It was located in a `Vitrinenschrank im Rauchzimmer am gelben Salon and had been sent or brought by `Geheimer Hofrat Nitz. In 1964 it was brought from Doorn to Hohenzollern castle in Hechingen, the familys ancestral seat.11 Footnotes 1 Kandt, op. cit., p. 83. 2 Kandt, op. cit., p. 83. 3 www.amt-odervorland.de 4 The German inscription reads in translation: His Most Serene Most Powerful Prince and Lord, Lord Friedrich the Third, Margrave and Prince Elector of Brandenburg shot this stag: in Biegen on the Jacobsdorff moor, on the 18th September Anno 1696. The stag was shot during the rutting season after he had roared for 3 weeks and weighed 5 centiner and 35 pounds (A centner or Zentner weighed approximately 50kg). 5 Seidel, op. cit., p. 157. 6 Seidel, op. cit., p. 163. 7 Hartmann, op. cit., p. 107. 8 Macgregor, op. cit. pp. 319 and 320. 9 Seidel, op. cit., p. 157. 10 Hobusch, Unsere Jagd, 1/2001. 11 Family papers.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2017-07-05
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Annons

THE CUNHA BRAGA CUP

THE CUNHA BRAGA CUP A HIGHLY IMPORTANT RENAISSANCE ENAMELLED GOLD-MOUNTED ROCK-CRYSTAL AND GLASS CUP CIRCA 1600-1610, PROBABLY SOUTH GERMAN, POSSIBLY AUGSBURG Boat-shaped, the semi-translucent yellowish amber-coloured body with finely faceted quartz exterior and on small oval flat base, the polished glass interior displaying a cellular effect, the exterior of the gold rim mount applied at one end with a handle formed as a dramatically modelled winged dragon with dark green enamel body and snarling twisted lighter green head with red enamel eyes, resting his purple front claws on the rim and his back claws and tail on the enamel band below, the dragon's back inset with polished rough glass over powdered amber on gold base, the exterior of the rim mount repoussé and enamelled en ronde bosse above a waved reeded gold band, one side with a bas-relief of a huntsman blowing a horn with two hounds pursuing a stag with trees and buildings in the background, the other with a huntsman and hounds chasing a hare, all in shades of red, blue, gold, green and brown on a white ground, the lip with scrolling paired acanthus, pea-pod ornament and other flowers and foliage, the interior champlevé and basse taille enamelled in similar colours with further hunting scenes incorporating a mounted horseman, two hunters with rifles and another blowing a horn and with hounds chasing and killing game, all within scrolling multi-coloured flowers, exotic birds, snails and butterflies, the lip with twinned dolphin-headed scrolls, all on a white ground between plain polished gold mounts, the lower one waved to fit the contours of the glass lining Overall length 5½ in. (14 cm.); overall height 2 5/8 in. ( 7.3 cm.); overall width 2¾in (7 cm.)

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2006-11-30
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THE MAHARAJA OF PATIALA'S BANQUETING-SERVICE AN EXTENSIVE GEORGE V SILVER-GILT DINNER-SERVICE

THE MAHARAJA OF PATIALA'S BANQUETING-SERVICE AN EXTENSIVE GEORGE V SILVER-GILT DINNER-SERVICE MARK OF THE GOLDSMITHS' AND SILVERSMITHS' COMPANY, LONDON, 1921 Each piece with a scroll and foliage border above cast and chased panels of animals, separated by cast daggers, variously engraved or cast with coat-of-arms, crown and initials Comprising: a.) A Centrepiece Formed as three bowls supported on shaped conforming stand, the flower and foliage decorated feet applied with cast elephant's mask, the handles of the bowls with cast lion's masks, marked under bowls and under stand the stand 45 in. (114.5 cm.) wide 710 oz. (22,103 gr.) b.) A Set of Four Five-Light Candelabra Each on four lion's paw feet, the stands applied with cast elephant masks, each marked on foot, on central socket and on nozzles 26 in. (66 cm.) high gross weight 883 oz. (27,470 gr.) c.) A Pair of Soup-Tureens, Covers and Ladles With lion's mask-capped handles, the detachable covers with quatrefoil ogee loop handles, marked under base, on handle and on cover bezel 17¾ in. (45 cm.) wide over handles 306 oz. (9,522 gr.) d.) Two Centrepiece-Bowls Each oval and with lion's mask-capped handles and on four lion's paw feet, each marked underneath 21½ in. (55 cm.) wide and slightly smaller 313 oz. (9,742 gr.) e.) A Set of Four Centrepiece-Bowls Each circular, with spreading foot and on four lion's paw feet, each marked underneath 10½ in. (26.5 cm.) diam. 149 oz. (4,633 gr.) f.) A Set of Four Bowls Each oval with lion's mask handles, the conforming base on four lion's paw feet, each marked underneath 14½ in. (37 cm.) wide 145 oz. (4,504 gr.) g.) A Pair of Bowls Each oval with lion's mask handles and conforming base, each marked underneath 14¾ in. (37.5 cm.) wide 67 oz. (2,075 gr.) h.) A Set of Three Meat-Dish Covers Each oval with a quatrefoil ogee loop handle, each marked on top and under handle 14 in. (35.5 cm.) wide 158 oz. (4,900 gr.) i.) A Set of Four Baskets Each shell-shaped with openwork sides and on three lion's paw feet, with rising lion's mask-capped scroll handles, the back applied with cast elephant mask, each marked near border 10¼ in. (26 cm.) wide 131 oz. (4086 gr.) j.) A Set of Twenty Sauceboats and Twenty Sauce-Ladles Each oval double-lipped on conforming foot, the scroll handles incorporating cast lion's masks, each marked underneath 8 in. (20.5 cm.) wide 460 oz. (14,293 gr.) k.) A Set of Eleven Entrée-Dishes and Covers Each circular with two lion's mask-capped scroll handles, the detachable covers with quatrefoil ogee-loop handles, five with detachable tripartite part-pierced dividers, with a further cover and handle each marked underneath, inside cover and on handle 12 in. (30.6 cm.) wide over handles 677 oz. (21,069 gr.) l.) A Set of Six Entrée-Dishes and Covers Each oval, three with conforming quatrefoil ogee loop handles, three handles lacking, each marked underneath 12½ in. (31.5 cm.) wide 353 oz. (10,981 gr.) m.) A Set of Thirty-Seven Soup-Plates Each shaped circular, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked underneath 9½ in. (24 cm.) diam. 725 oz. (22,542 gr.) n.) A Set of One Hundred Forty-Eight Dessert-Plates Each shaped circular, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked underneath 8¼ in. (21 cm.) diam. 1,840 oz. (57,239 gr.) o.) One Hundred Eighty-Three Dinner-Plates, Each shaped circular, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked underneath 9¾ in. (24.5 cm.) diam. 3,575 oz. (110,194 gr.) p.) A Set of Six Meat-Dishes Each shaped oval, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 19½ in. (50 cm.) wide 359 oz. (11,149 gr.) q.) A Set of Twelve Meat-Dishes Each shaped oval, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 18 in. (45.6 cm.) wide 743 oz. (23,123 gr.) r.) A Set of Six Meat-Dishes Each shaped oblong, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 15½ in. (39.2 cm.) wide 266 oz. (8,271 gr.) s.) A Set of Three Fish-Dishes and Three Mazarines Each shaped oval, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each fitted with a conforming detachable mazarine, each marked on the back 26 in. (66 cm.) wide 429 oz. (13,328 gr.) t.) A Set of Six Deep Second-Course Dishes Each shaped circular, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 14¼ in. (36 cm.) diam. 314 oz. (9,760 gr.) u.) A Set of Three Salvers Each shaped circular, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 18¾ in. (47.7 cm.) diam. 312 oz. (7,718 gr.) v.) A Set of Six Salvers Each shaped circular, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 14¾ in. (37 cm.) wide 345 oz. (10,729 gr.) w.) Three Coffee-Pots Each tapering cylindrical and on circular spreading foot with scrolling ivory-insulated leaf-capped handle, the hinged cover with bud finial, each marked below handle, inside cover and on handle 9¾ in. (24.8 cm.) high gross weight 86 oz. (2,682 gr.) x.) Three Hot-Water Jugs Each tapering cylindrical and on circular spreading foot with ogee-formed spout and ivory-insulated scrolling leaf-capped handle, the hinged cover with bud finial, each marked below handle, inside cover and on handle 10 in. (25.3 cm.) high 82 oz. (2,548 gr.) y.) Three Sugar-Bowls and Three Pairs of Sugar-Tongs Each on circular spreading foot with lion mask-capped scrolling handles, each marked underneath 7½ in. (19 cm.) wide over handles 39 oz. (1,208 gr.) z.) A Set of Eighteen Mustard-Pots and Eighteen Mustard-Spoons Each on circular spreading foot with lion mask-capped scrolling handles, the hinged cover with bud finial, each marked underneath and inside cover 4 1/8 in. (10.4 cm.) high 148 oz. (4,580 gr.) aa.) A Set of Eighteen Salt-Cellars and Eighteen Salt-Spoons Each circular on spreading foot, each with a salt-spoon, each marked underneath 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) diam. 103 oz. (3,308 gr.) ab.) A Set of Eighteen Pepperettes Each vase-shaped on spreading foot, the detachable cover with bud finial, each marked near rim and on cover bezel 4¾ in. (12 cm.) high 54 oz. (1,671 gr.) ac.) Forty-Three Finger-Bowls Each circular on conforming base, each marked underneath 4 5/8 in. (11.6 cm.) diam. 311 oz. (9,658 gr.) ad.) A Set of Six Sugar-Casters Each vase shaped on spreading foot, the detachable cover pierced and with bud finial, each marked underneath and on cover bezel 7¼ in. (18.5 cm) high 58 oz. (1,790 gr.) ae.) Two Cruet-Stands Each boat-shaped with rising lion mask-capped scroll ends and on four lion's paw feet, with quatrefoil ogee loop handle, bottles lacking, each marked underneath 8½ in. (21 cm.) wide 44 oz. (1,373 gr.) af.) A Set of Twelve Almond-Dishes Each shaped oval and on four paw feet, the border cast with animals in medallions surrounded by flowers, further cast with initials and a crown, each marked on the back 7½ in. (19 cm.) wide 79 oz. (2,456 gr.) ag.) A Table-Service Each piece with a scroll and foliage and border and decorated with a palmette, die-stamped with a cypher below a crown on one side and either a coat-of-arms or an elephant on the other, comprising: One-hundred and sixty six table-forks One-hundred and eleven dessert-forks One-hundred and eleven dessert-spoons Twenty-one table-spoons Thirty-seven soup-spoons Thirty-seven coffee-spoons Six pairs of salad-servers Two pairs of fish-servers Six pairs of asparagus-tongs Six ginger-spoons Three pairs of grape-scissors Six spoons with shell shaped bowls and the following with filled handles One-hundred and seven table-knives with steel blades Seventy-four cheese-knives with steel blades Thirty-seven fruit-knives with silver-gilt blades Thirty-seven fruit-forks with silver-gilt tines Thirty-seven fish-knives with silver-gilt blades Thirty-seven fish-forks with silver-gilt tines Three melon-knives with silver-gilt blades Three melon-forks with silver-gilt blades total weighable silver 15,547 oz. (482,572 gr.)

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2013-07-04
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THE LEINSTER SERVICE A GEORGE II SILVER DINNER-SERVICE

THE LEINSTER SERVICE A GEORGE II SILVER DINNER-SERVICE MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1745-1756 Comprising the following as detailed fully on the following pages: A pair of Soup-Tureens, Covers, Liners, Stands and Ladles An Epergne and Plateau Seventy Dinner-Plates A set of Eighteen Soup-Plates A set of Twenty-Nine Dishes, Twenty-Two Covers and Two Mazarines A set of Eleven Salvers and Waiters A set of Four Candlesticks A set of Eight Sauceboats and Four Sauce-Ladles A pair of Cruet-Stands A pair of Boxes and Covers A set of Four Condiment-Vases Total gross weight 5,295 oz. 9 dwt. (164,705 gr.) (184) The arms are those of FitzGerald impaling the Royal arms of Charles II for James FitzGerald, 20th Earl of Kildare, later 1st Duke of Leinster (1722-1773), and his wife Lady Emily (1731-1814), daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond, whom he married on 7 February 1747. a.) A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER SOUP-TUREENS, COVERS, LINERS, STANDS AND LADLES THE LINERS, STANDS AND LADLES EACH WITH THE MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746, THE TUREENS AND COVERS APPARENTLY UNMARKED, CIRCA 1746 Each shaped oval on four openwork leaf-capped scroll feet, chased and pierced with stylized shells and scrolls and with reeded handles, the domed covers similarly chased and with reeded handles, each with plain liner, the stands with shell handles and reeded and shell borders, each with soup-ladle with fluted shell bowl, the stands each engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet, the liners and ladles each engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, marked under the liners, stands and on ladles, the liners each numbered and engraved with a scratchweight 'No 1 19?=5' and 'No 2 191=12', the stands engraved 'No 1 88=12' and 'No 2 89=5', the ladles engraved 'No 1 11=12' and 'No 2 11=?' The stands 21 in. (53.5 cm.) long 570 oz. 8 dwt. (17,742 gr.) (6) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 17 February 1746 'To 2 Turreens [sic] 2 Dishes and 2 Ladles 592 oz. 14 dwt 6/1 £180 5s 6d' 'To Making at 7/6 £222 5s 3 d' 'To Graving Arms and Mantling on these 4 crests & Corts £8 12s' b.) A GEORGE II SILVER EPERGNE AND PLATEAU THE PLATEAU WITH MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746, THE EPERGNE APPARENTLY UNMARKED, CIRCA 1746 The epergne on six shell and leaf-capped scroll feet and with pierced canopy, cast and chased with trailing vines and a finial cast as a basket of flowers, the plateau on four leaf-capped scroll feet and with shell, scroll and foliage border, the sides applied with foliage scrolls and cast with cornucopia, engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet within trailing foliage issuing from vases, with mahogany base set with four part-ivory castors, the plateau fully marked underneath and with maker's mark only on border the plateau 26¾ in. (68 cm.) long gross weight 395 oz. 14 dwt. (12,307 gr.) (2) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 19 August 1746 'To a Fine Epargne [sic] and Basket & Table 427 oz. 16 dwt. 16/- £342 5s' 'To Graving the Border and Arms on the Table and Arm on Baskets £16 16s' 'To a Mahogany Board & brass Casters Silver'd for the Table £1 10s' c.) SEVENTY SILVER DINNER-PLATES SIXTY-NINE WITH MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, THIRTY-SEVEN 1745, TWENTY 1746, TWELVE 1756, ONE MODERN Each shaped circular and with reeded and shell borders, each engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked underneath, further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 3 19=5'; 'No 4 20=0'; 'No 5 20=2'; 'No 7 19=19' 'No 10 19=10';'No 11 19=17'; 'No 12 19=8'; 'No 13 19=13'; 'No 14 19=8'; 'No 15 19=18'; 'No 17 19=17'; 'No 19 19=12'; 'No 21 19=16'; 'No 22 19=8'; 'No 24 19=14'; 'No 26 19=17'; 'No 27 19=18'; 'No 28 20=0'; 'No 29 20=4'; 'No 30 19=19'; 'No 31 20=3'; 'No 32 19=10'; 'No 33 19=19'; 'No 34 20=1'; 'No 35 19=8'; 'No 36 19=12'; 'No 37 19=18'; 'No 38 19=18'; 'No 39 19=18'; 'No 40 19=15'; 'No 41 19=11'; 'No 43 19=11'; 'No 44 19=10'; 'No 45 19=10'; 'No 46 19=15'; 'No 47 19=9'; 'No 48 19=9'; 'No 50 19=11'; 'No 51 19=13'; 'No 52 19=15'; 'No 53 19=17'; 'No 54 19=13'; 'No 55 19=6'; 'No 56 20=1'; 'No 57 19=19'; 'No 58 19=14'; 'No 59 19=11'; 'No 60 19=16'; 'No 61 19=16'; 'No 63 19=10'; 'No 64 19=13'; 'No 66 19=8'; 'No 67 19=7'; 'No 68 19=17'; 'No 69 19=14'; 'No 70 19=6'; 'No 71 19=18'; 'No 74 19=19'; 'No 76 19=17'; 'No 77 19=18'; 'No 78 19=18'; 'No 79 19=19'; 'No 83 19=8'; 'No 84 19=17'; 'No 85 19=15'; 'No 86 19=18'; 'No 90 19=19'; 'No 94 19=17' and 'No 95 19=13' 10 in. (25.4 cm.) diam. The George II plates 1,290 oz. (40,123 gr.) (70) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 7 dozn ½ of Plates 1794 oz. 6 dwt. 8/7 £770 1s. 2d' (part) d.) A SET OF EIGHTEEN GEORGE II SILVER SOUP-PLATES MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, FOUR 1745 AND FOURTEEN 1746 Each shaped circular and with reeded and shell borders, each engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked underneath, further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 20=17'; 'No 2 20=17'; 'No 3 21=7'; 'No 4 21=6'; 'No 5 21=5'; 'No 6 20=15'; 'No 7 20=11'; 'No 8 20=19'; 'No 10 21=4'; 'No 11 21=7'; 'No 12 21=1'; 'No 13 21=7'; 'No 14 21=5'; 'No 15 20=14'; 'No 16 20=19'; 'No 17 20=13'; 'No 19 20=3' and 'No 78 20=4' 10 in. (25.6 cm.) diam. 363 oz. 12 dwt. (11,308 gr.) (18) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 7 dozn ½ of Plates 1794 oz. 6 dwt. 8/7 £770 1s. 2d' (part) e.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER SECOND-COURSE DISHES AND COVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped circular and with reeded and shell borders, the domed covers with applied foliate scroll strapwork and central reeded handles, each dish and cover engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under dish and on cover, the covers and dishes each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 29=0 and 31=6'; 'No 2 30=6 and 31=13'; 'No 3 28=18 and 30=9' and 'No 4 29=6 and 31=14' the dishes 12½ in. (31.6 cm.) diam. 228 oz. 2 dwt. (7,094 gr.) (8) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 and 17 February 1746 'To 30 Dishes 1152 oz. 14 dwt. 9/1 £523 10s. 6d' (part) 'To 22 Dish Covers 871 oz. 10 dwt. 9/7 £417 12s' (part) 'To Graving 22 Crests and Corts Large 4 8s' (part) f.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER SECOND-COURSE DISHES AND COVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped circular and with reeded and shell borders, the domed covers with applied foliate scroll strapwork and central reeded handles, each dish and cover engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under dish and on cover, the covers and dishes each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 5 32=15 and 37=4'; 'No 6 33=12 and 38=0'; 'No 7 34=2 and 37=11' and 'No 8 31=18 and 36=8' the dishes 13¼ in. (33.5 cm.) diam. 271 oz. 10 dwt. (8,443 gr.) (8) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 and 17 February 1746 'To 30 Dishes 1152 oz. 14 dwt. 9/1 £523 10s. 6d' (part) 'To 22 Dish Covers 871 oz. 10 dwt. 9/7 £417 12s' (part) 'To Graving 22 Crests and Corts Large £4 8s' (part) g.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER MEAT-DISHES AND COVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped oval with shell handles and reeded and shell borders, the domed covers with applied foliate scroll strapwork and central reeded handles, each dish and cover engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under dish and on cover, the covers and dishes each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 9 25=7 and 28=10'; 'No 10 23=0 and 27=5'; 'No 11 24=13 and 27=12' and 'No 12 24=6 and 27=19' the dishes 13½ in. (34.2 cm.) wide 199 oz. 2 dwt. (6,192 gr.) (8) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 and 17 February 1746 'To 30 Dishes 1152 oz. 14 dwt. 9/1 £523 10s. 6d' (part) 'To 22 Dish Covers £871 oz. 10 dwt. 9/7 £417 12s' (part) 'To Graving 22 Crests and Corts Large £4 8s' (part) h.) A SET OF EIGHT GEORGE II SILVER MEAT-DISHES AND FOUR COVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped oval with shell handles and reeded and shell borders, the domed covers with applied foliate scroll strapwork and central reeded handles, each dish and cover engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under dish and on cover, the covers and dishes each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 13 27=9 and 31=12'; 'No 14 26=15 and 31=9'; 'No 15 27=19 and 30=16'; 'No 16 28=11 and 30=2'; 'No 17 28=10'; 'No 18 28=5'; 'No 19 27=19' and 'No 20 27=12' the dishes 14 1/8 in. (36 cm.) wide 329 oz. 6 dwt. (10,244 gr.) (12) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 and 17 February 1746 'To 30 Dishes 1152 oz. 14 dwt. 9/1 £523 10s. 6d' (part) 'To 22 Dish Covers 871 oz. 10 dwt. 9/7 £417 12s' (part) 'To Graving 22 Crests and Corts Large £4 8s' (part) i.) A SET OF FIVE GEORGE II SILVER MEAT-DISHES AND FOUR COVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped oval with shell handles and reeded and shell borders, the domed covers with applied foliate scroll strapwork and central reeded handles, each dish and cover engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under dish and on cover, the dishes each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 21 46=4'; 'No 22 46=5'; 'No 23 45=12', 'No 24 48=4' and 'No 25 47=0', the covers each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 17 50=18'; 'No 18 50=8'; 'No 19 50=18' and 'No 20 50=8' the dishes 18 in. (45.5 cm.) wide 416 oz. 7 dwt. (12,949 gr.) (9) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 and 17 February 1746 'To 30 Dishes 1152 oz. 14 dwt. 9/1 £523 10s. 6d' (part) 'To 22 Dish Covers 871 oz. 10 dwt. 9/7 £417 12s' (part) 'To Graving 22 Crests and Corts Large £4 8s' (part) j.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER MEAT-DISHES, TWO COVERS AND TWO MAZARINES MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped oval with shell handles and reeded and shell borders, the domed covers with applied foliate scroll strapwork and central reeded handles, each dish and cover engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under dish and on cover, the dishes each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 27 74=16'; 'No 28 78=5'; 'No 29 76=10' and 'No 30 74=4', the covers each engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 21 81=3' and 'No 22 79=6', the mazarines engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 27=5' and 'No 2 26=18' the dishes 21½ in. (54.6 cm.) wide 494 oz. 18 dwt. (15,394 gr.) (8) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 and 17 February 1746 'To 30 Dishes 1152 oz. 14 dwt. 9/1 £523 10s. 6d' (part) 'To 22 Dish Covers 871 oz. 10 dwt. 9/7 £417 12s' (part) 'To Graving 22 Crests and Corts Large £4 8s' (part) 'To 4 Fish Plates 93 oz. 9/7 £44 11s. 3d' (part) k.) A GEORGE II SILVER SALVER MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Shaped circular on four scroll feet and with reeded and shell border, engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet within a band of shells and scrolling foliage, marked underneath, further numbered and engraved with a scratchweight 'No 1 120=10' 21 in. (53.3 cm.) diam. 115 oz. 6 dwt. (3,587 gr.) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 1 Large & 10 Smaller Waiters 362 oz. 2 dwt. 11/1 £200 13s 2d' (part) l.) A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER SALVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped circular on four scroll feet and with reeded and shell border, each engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet within a band of shells and scrolling foliage, each marked underneath, further numbered and engraved with a scratchweight 'No 2 59=9' and 'No 3 58=18' 15 in. (38 cm.) diam. 111 oz. 2 dwt. (3,456 gr.) (2) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 1 Large & 10 Smaller Waiters 362 oz. 2 dwt. 11/1 £200 13s 2d' (part) m.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER WAITERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped circular on four scroll feet and with reeded and shell border, each engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet within a band of shells and scrolling foliage, each marked underneath, further numbered and engraved with a scratchweight 'No 4 19=6'; 'No 5 19=8'; 'No 6 19=8' and 'No 7 19=1' 9½ in. (24.1 cm.) diam. 70 oz. 12 dwt. (2,197 gr.) (4) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 1 Large & 10 Smaller Waiters 362 oz. 2 dwt. 11/1 £200 13s 2d' (part) n.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER WAITERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746 Each shaped circular on four scroll feet and with reeded and shell border, each engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet within a band of shells and scrolling foliage, each marked underneath, further numbered and engraved with a scratchweight 'No 8 11=14'; 'No 9 11=18'; 'No 10 11=6' and 'No 11 11=5' 7¾ in. (19.7 cm.) diam. 41 oz. (1,275 gr.) (4) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 1 Large & 10 Smaller Waiters 362 oz. 2 dwt. 11/1 £200 13s 2d' (part) o.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER CANDLESTICKS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1748 Each on spreading circular base and four shell feet with fluted baluster stems, with spool-shaped sockets and plain fixed nozzles, each engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked under base, further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 23=4'; 'No 2 24=6'; 'No 3 24=4' and 'No 4 22=11' 9 1/8 in. (23.2 cm.) high 90 oz. 17 dwt. (2,825 gr.) (4) p.) A SET OF EIGHT GEORGE II SILVER SAUCEBOATS AND FOUR SAUCE-LADLES THE SAUCEBOATS WITH MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, 1746, THE LADLES APPARENTLY UNMARKED, CIRCA 1746 Each shaped oval on three scroll feet and with reeded and foliage borders and leaf-capped scroll handles, the ladles cast with foliage and shells and with shell cast bowls, each engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, the sauceboats each marked underneath, further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 23=12'; 'No 2 23=1'; 'No 3 23=1'; 'No 4 22=9'; 'No 5 22=15'; 'No 6 23=4'; 'No 7 16=16?' and 'No 8 17=5' six 8½ in. (21.6 cm.) wide and two 7¼ in. (18.4 cm.) wide 175 oz. 2 dwt. (5,447 gr.) (12) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 9 February 1746 'To 10 Sauceboats & 10 Spoons 232 oz. 17 dwt. 11/1 £129 1s' (part) q.) A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER CRUET-STANDS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, CIRCA 1746 Each on four scroll feet, the sides pierced with shells and scrolls and with leaf-capped scroll handle, fitted with two cut-glass bottles, each with detachable silver cover with bud finial, each engraved underneath with a crest below an earl's coronet, each marked underneath with maker's mark only struck four times, further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 21=11' and 'No 2 21=16' 7 5/8 in. (19.4 cm.) wide 50 oz. 8 dwt. (1,567 gr.) weighable silver (2) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 17 February and 2 May 1746 'To 4 Cruet Tops 7 oz. 16 dwt. 6/1 £2 7s 6d' 'To 4 Tops for gls Cruets 2 oz. 10 dwt. 6/1 15s 2d' 'To making £3 3s' r.) A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER BOXES AND COVERS MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, CIRCA 1746 Each oval and on openwork spreading foot, chased with shells, scrolls and with reeded borders, with two handles, the domed covers with trailing foliage and bud finials, each engraved underneath with an initial 'K' below an earl's coronet, each marked underneath with maker's mark only struck three times, each engraved underneath with number and scratchweight 'No 1 20=19' and 'No 2 21=13' 6 in. (15.2 cm.) wide over handles 41 oz. 15 dwt. (1,299 gr.) (2) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 17 February 1746 'To 2 ovill [sic] and 4 round boxes 83 oz. 14 dwt. 6/1 £25 9s 1d' (part) 'To making 7/6 £31 7s. 9d' (part) s.) A SET OF FOUR GEORGE II SILVER CONDIMENT-VASES MARK OF GEORGE WICKES, LONDON, CIRCA 1746 Each baluster on openwork spreading foot, chased with shells and scrolls, the domed covers chased with trailing foliage and with bud finial, each engraved with a crest below an earl's coronet, further engraved underneath with an initial 'K' below an earl's coronet, each marked underneath with maker's mark only, further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No 1 10=3'; 'No 2 10=8'; 'No 3 10=1' and 'No 4 10=9' 5 in. (14 cm.) high 40 oz. 8 dwt. (1,256 gr.) (4) The Rt. Honble. The Earl of Kildare, Debtor 17 February 1746 'To 2 ovill [sic] and 4 round boxes 83 oz. 14 dwt. 6/1 £25 9s 1d' (part) 'To making 7/6 £31 7s. 9d' (part)

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2012-07-05
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An important queen anne carved and figured walnut armchair, philadelphia

Seat and seat rail with roman numeral V. Among the rarest and most magnificent examples of the Queen Anne aesthetic in Philadelphia, this armchair bears additional importance as stemming from the only set of American Queen Anne armchairs in existence today. The armchair is number V of a set of at least eight armchairs with a correspondingly numbered seat frame. Five other armchairs from the set are known: two at Winterthur Museum (III and VIII), one in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (unmarked), a fourth in a private collection (IIII), and one with a history in the Biddle family of Philadelphia published as the property of David Stockwell.1   Comparable in proportion, meticulously designed and extravagantly constructed of choice highly figured walnut, all the chairs in the set display the distinctive characteristics of rounded stiles laminated on both the lower and upper portions; wrought iron braces reinforcing the rear juncture of the crest rail and the stiles; seat rails, seat frames, and applied seat rail lips crafted from the same block of walnut with rough kerf tool markings on the inside lip of the seat rail and the presence of holes in the seat frame sides that correspond to the side seat rails; the use of solid figured walnut for the splat and broad volutes for the knee returns; and trifid feet with extra cyma shaping of the curve. The set undoubtedly represents a special commission by an original owner of significant prominence. One armchair in the collection of Winterthur Museum (acc. no. 59.2501, no. III, slip seat III) descended through the Latourette family and was among the furnishings of the Staats-Latourette homestead in Bound Brook, New Jersey (see illustration).  It appears pictured in a circa 1905 picture of the parlor with a child seated in it (see illustration). The homestead came into the Staats family in 1738 and was first owned by Peter Staats, passing through two family owners to Abraham Staats (1743-1821), a farmer, surveyor, and active patriot, in 1770. During the second Middlebrook encampment, the inspector general of the Revolutionary army, Baron Von Steuben, was quartered at the homestead, where he entertained George Washington and other senior generals. At Abraham Staats death, the homestead passed to his children and next to his granddaughter, Margaret Ann Bayles, who married Cornelius Wyckoff Latourette. Staats/Latourette heirs owned the homestead until 1935, when Eugene D. Latourette sold the house out of the family. Helen Cook Latourette, Eugene’s wife, sold the armchair to H.F. du Pont around that same time, in circa 1934. The other armchair at Winterthur (acc. no. 59.2500, no. VIII, slip seat I) bears the ink inscription on the front seat rail “This chair made in 1725 sent from England to John Heale Esq. Bought by J. Jay Smith Esq. in 1878 & presented to the Dau: Elizth P Smith July 29th 1878 born 1825” (see illustration).  Research indicates that J Jay Smith refers to John Jay Smith (1798-1881), an editor, publisher, founder of Laurel Hill Cemetery and the Germantown Horticultural Society, and librarian of the Library Company and the Loganian Library, the private library of James Logan (1674-1751) formerly housed in Stenton. In 1742, James Logan decided to endow his library for use by the City of Philadelphia and towards that end, planned to erect a building on Sixth-Street, between Chestnut and Walnut directly behind the State House. After his death in 1751, he bequeathed his library “solely … for the use of the public” and his books were moved from Stenton to the Sixth-Street building in 1753-4. The library officially opened on November 8, 1760.  A notice published in the Pennsylvanian Gazette on October 30, 1760 indicated that “the LOGANIAN LIBRARY … will be opened on Saturday the 8th of November next, where Attendance will be given every Saturday, from the third Hour in the Afternoon until the seventh Hour following, in the Summer time, and so long as one may see to read in Winter.” On May 31, 1792 by the right of Logan’s son, James Logan, Jr., the Loganian Library was established as a public trust and merged with the Library Company of Philadelphia. On June 21, 1792,the books were removed from the Sixth Street property (which was then sold) and relocated to the new wing of Library Hall, which opened on May 1, 1794. The library was relocated in 1878 to the Ridgeway Library where it was housed until 1966, when it was moved to Locust Street and placed adjacent to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.2 One of the stipulations placed upon the Loganian Library in James Logan’s will was the librarian must be a descendant of James Logan “preferring the male line to female.”  Therefore, John Jay Smith was a direct descendant of James Logan and the association of the date of the chairs purchase and presentation to his daughter Elizabeth Pearsall Smith (1825-1914) is uncanny. A Quaker, Colonial Dame, founder of the Germantown Branch of the Young Women’s Christian Association, and editor of Recollections of John Jay Smith (1892), Elizabeth Smith lived at her home, Ivy Lodge, in Germantown, which was built by her father in 1849. She died there in 1914, at age 89, and left Ivy Lodge and her personal effects to her nephew, Albanus L. Smith. The armchair was later acquired by Joe Kindig, who subsequently sold it to H.F. du Pont. The armchair (no. IIII, slip seat 4) in a private collection also bears an inscription detailing ownership on its seat frame (see illustration). The inscription reads: John and Mary Ann Bacon 1801, Geo. B. Wood 1859, Mary May Dunn 1909. John Bacon (1779-1859) was born in Greenwich, N.J. and moved to Philadelphia, where he served as treasurer of the City of Philadelphia from 1816-1829, treasurer of the Pennsylvania Institute for the Deaf & Dumb from 1820 to 1859 and 8th Inspector of the Penitentiary from 1831 to 1859. On September 22, 1801, he married Mary Ann Warder (1782-1863), the daughter of John (1751-1828) and Ann Head Warder (1758-1829), granddaughter of Jeremiah Warder (1711-1783), a prominent Philadelphia merchant, and great-granddaughter of John Head (1688-1754), the Philadelphia cabinetmaker. From 1830 to 1859, they lived in Philadelphia at No. 117 Sassafras (now Race) Street in a house that formerly served as Henry Epple’s Inn. The inscription on the chair indicates John and Mary Ann Bacon received the armchair in 1801. This date corresponds to the year they married and the year of the death of John Bacon’s father, Job (1735-1801). Job Bacon was a member a Quaker family of Greenwich, N.J. who lived at Bacon’s Neck, a two hundred and sixty acre property on the Cohansey River pioneered by Samuel Bacon (1659-1695), a member of the Provincial Assembly of West Jersey and a Justice of the Court for Salem County.3  Job Bacon married Mary Lownes, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Lownes of Philadelphia, on February 24, 1774. At John Bacon’s death in 1859, the armchair passed on to his grandson George Bacon Wood (1832-1909), a Quaker, prolific American painter and photographer who lived in Germantown, Philadelphia.  At his death in 1909, he bequeathed his “grandfather’s armchair” to his daughter, Mary May Wood (b. 1859), who married Harry Martyn Dunn (d. 1906) in 1882 and Edward T. Comfort (d. 1936) in 1915. Several photographs taken by George Bacon Wood in the late 19th century currently in the collection of the Library Company illustrate the armchair in George Bacon Wood’s studio and Mary and Harry Dunn’s residence in Germantown (see illustration).  Mary Dunn later moved to Staten Island and one of her descendants sold the armchair to the current owner. The armchair in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (acc no. 1964.212.1) descended in the family of Eleanor Thomson Mullen (see illustration). She gave it to the museum in 1964 and stated in a June 9, 1964 letter to the museum curator “the chair was used by Washington and Lafayette when they came to tea in my ancestors’ home in old Philadelphia” where, “on one occasion Washington scratched his initials in a window pane.”  The chair follows the design of the others in the set and displays the wrought iron braces on the crest rail but is not numbered and differs from the others in several respects. These include the pine slip seat, the lack of an applied seat frame lip and screw holes in the seat frame and slip seat, and the chamfered rear legs. It has recently been determined that the early, if not original, upholstery treatment on this armchair was leather. Several other pieces of Philadelphia furniture with similar design and construction characteristics appear to stem from the same shop as this set of armchairs. A walnut side chair of the same design with braces on the rear of the crest rail and shaped stiles laminated on the lower and upper portions is in the Naomi Wood Collection at Woodford, the summer home built between 1756 and 1758 by William Coleman of Philadelphia.4  A side chair in the collection of the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, one in a private collection and two formerly owned by Israel Sack Inc. are from a related set and display the same shell, volute, and foot carving as well as stile and seat frame construction.5  A side chair in the collection of Bayou Bend represents another set.6 Identical shell, volute and foot carving appear on a dressing table with a history in the Bush-Snader family.7  Similar shell-carved knees and trifid feet are found on a marble-top slab table in a private collection attributed to Henry Clifton and Thomas Carteret while identical volutes are featured on a dressing table at Winterthur Museum (acc. no. 1953.68).[8] A side chair from a similar set with the more Rococo details of a pierced splat and ruffle-carved volutes sold in these rooms, Important Americana, January 16-17, 1999, sale 7253, lot 797. Two side chairs in a private collection, numbers III and VI of a set, appear to represent the same shop tradition. Gifford Pinchot, former Governor of Pennsylvania, owned the chair marked III in the early 20th century at Grey Towers, his home in Milford, Pennsylvania. Chair VI was deaccessioned by Colonial Williamsburg as a bequest of Gertrude Peck (1897-1980) of Tacoma, Washington. Chair V from the same set remains in the Colonial Williamsburg collection (1980.124.1). For their assistance with the research for this lot, Sotheby's wishes to thank Wendy Cooper, Brock Jobe and Susan Newton at Winterthur Museum, Alexandra Kirtley and David DeMuzio at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Laura Keim Stutman at Stenton, Martha Moffat at Woodford, James Green and Charlene Peacock at the Library Company of Philadelphia, and Jay Stiefel. 1 Joseph Downs, American Furniture: Queen Anne and Chippendale Periods, (New York: Macmillan Co., 1952), no. 27, Jack Lindsey, Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680-1758, (Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1999), p. 172, no. 157, Charles F Montgomery and Patricia E Kane, American Art: 1750-1800 Towards Independence, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Art Gallery, 1976), p. 146, no. 92, and John Walker, Experts Choice: 1000 Years of the Art Trade (New York: Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1983), p. 129. 2 Edwin Wolf 2nd, The Library of James Logan of Philadelphia, 1674-1751, (Philadelphia: The Library Company of Philadelphia, 1974), pp. xvii-xlix. 3 Herbert Marion Bacon, Bacon’s Adventure, (New York: The Bankers Press, 1948). 4 This chair is unpublished. Another side chair appearing to stem from the same set is illustrated in Joseph Kindig, The Philadelphia Chair, 1685-1785, 1978, pl. 24. 5 Christopher Monkhouse, American Furniture in Pendleton House, (Providence, RI: Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 1986), p. 165, no. 106 and Israel Sack, Inc. American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, Vol. 6, p. 1531 and Vol. VII, p. 1716. 6 David Warren, et al, American Decorative Arts and Paintings in the Bayou Bend Collection, (Houston: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 1988), no. F47, p. 28. 7 Sack Collection, p. 1536-7. 8 Christie’s, October 24, 1992, sale 7526, lot 138 and Charles F. Hummel, A Winterthur Guide to American Chippendale Furniture (Winterthur, DE: The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, 1976), fig. 107, p. 117.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-10-07
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The important johnson family set of six queen anne figured maple rush

All chairs appear to retain their original finish.  Exceedingly rare for having survived as a large set and retaining their original surface, these maple side chairs with “spoon backs” and “crook’d feet” were originally owned by the Johnson family of Philadelphia, successful tanners, property holders and Quakers, and stood for approximately 130 years in their home, the Johnson House, located in Germantown. The house was completed in 1768 and given by Dirck Jansen, an early settler of Germantown, to his son John Johnson on the occasion of his marriage to Rachel Livezey in 1769 (Harold Eberlein and Courtlandt van Dyke Hubbard, Portrait of a Colonial City, Philadelphia, 1670-1838, p. 380). The present chairs were most likely purchased around the time of their marriage, probably from William Savery (1721/2-1787), the Philadelphia chairmaker and a fellow Quaker. The chairs descended through family owners of the Johnson House until 1905. These chairs follow the same design as rush-seat side chairs made by William Savery, who was known to have made a quantity of such chairs, counting some eighty-three examples in stock at one time (William Hornor, Blue Book Philadelphia Furniture, 1935, p. 295). A closely related side chair with Savery’s label sold in these rooms, Important Americana, January 16-7, 1999, sale 7253, lot 766 est. $20,000-40,000 for $134,500. It displays differences in the splat profile, shaping of the skirt, and turnings of the front stretcher but is otherwise identical. Another rush-seat side chair with Savery’s label illustrated as pl. 462 of Hornor is also very similar in design to the present chairs. A variant of the design is found on a maple side chair attributed to Savery that sold in these rooms, The Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Lammot du Pont Copeland, January 19, 2002, sale 7757, lot 356. A maple dressing table in a private collection with the same family history in the Johnson Family also bears an attribution to William Savery. It was included in the exhibition, Philadelphia: Three Centuries of American Art, held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1976 and illustrated in the accompanying catalogue as no. 40, pp. 51-2.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-01-22
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A HIGHLY IMPORTANT FRENCH SILVER TABLE SERVICE FOR TWENTY-FOUR SETTINGS

A HIGHLY IMPORTANT FRENCH SILVER TABLE SERVICE FOR TWENTY-FOUR SETTINGS Paris 1920-1921, by Odiot In the French Empire style, comprising more than one thousand pieces, most of the pieces based on the original designs and models made for Jean-Baptiste-Claude Odiot by Cavelier, Prud'hon, Moreau and others, engraved with owner's monogram, contained in seventeen fitted mahogany cases each with brass corners and plates, including front plate engraved with description of contents, the interiors lined in red suede, comprising: Case 1 Flatware: Twenty-four table spoons Seventy-two table forks Seventy-two table knives with steel blades Twenty-four fish forks Twenty-four fish knives Twenty-four butter knives Twenty-four egg spoons Twelve salt spoons Twenty-four pairs of individual asparagus tongs Four pairs of asparagus serving tongs Serving pieces: six serving spoons, six serving forks, six sauce ladles, four mustard spoons, four sugar sifters, sixteen hors-d'oeuvre serving pieces of various shapes, two salad spoons, two salad forks Weight of silver: 18,600 gr. Case 2 Dessert flatware: Twenty-four spoons Twenty-four forks Twenty-four knives with silver blades Twenty-four knives with steel blades Twenty-four fruit spoons Twenty-four fruit forks Twenty-four ice cream spoons Twenty-four tea spoons Twenty-four mocca spoons Six nutcrackers, metal Six pairs of grape scissors, metal Four compote ladles Two cream ladles Two sugar sifters Two ice cream slices and servers Two cake slices Two cheese knives with steel blades Two butter knives Eight candy serving pieces of various shapes 8,000 gr. Case 3 A pair of candelabra 10,800 gr. Case 4 A pair of candelabra, fitted for electricity 10,800 gr. Case 5 Twenty-four dessert plates Twenty-four ice cream plates Twenty-four butter plates Six cake stands 24,500 gr. Case 6 Six double salt cellars Twelve salt cellars Four mustard pots Four pepper mills Two oil and vinegar cruet stands 20,600 gr. Case 7 Ten oval dishes in pairs: 38 cm (15 in), 44 cm (17¼ in), 49 cm (19¼ in), 54 cm (21¼ in) and 69 cm (27¼ in) long Six circular dishes in pairs: 29 cm (11½ in), 31 cm (12¼ in) and 34.5 cm (13½ in) diam. Two square dishes One oval dish: 25 cm (9¾ in) long Twelve wine coasters 33,200 gr. Case 8 Four silver-mounted champagne jugs Two silver cups with metal interiors Three silver-mounted ice buckets Three pairs of ice tongs 11,500 gr. Case 9 One silver tray: 45 cm (17¾ in) wide Twenty-four silver and porcelain tea cups and saucers Twenty-four silver and porcelain coffee cups and saucers A liqueur set 13,900 gr. Case 10 A pair of wine coolers with liners Two silver and glass caviar coolers with covers Four silver and glass hors-d'oeuvres dishes One confiturier with glass pots 22,700 gr. Case 11 Two oval sugar bowls with stands Two cream bowls Six gratted cheese shells Twenty-four sherbet shells 7,200 gr. Case 12 A silver centre-piece fitted with mirror in three parts: 119.5 cm (47 in) long 5,300 gr. Case 13 Four large vases with metal liners Four silver stands with glass cups: 18 cm (7 in) diam. Two silver stands with glass cups: 22 cm (8¾ in) diam. 17,600 gr. Case 14 A pair of silver "chestnut plates" Twenty-four egg cups Twenty-four porcelain cups with silver holders Twenty-four menu holders Twelve tooth-pick holders Twelve spoons Twenty-four knife holders A pair of crumb lifters with sweepers 13,900 gr. Case 15 A large soup tureen with cover and metal interior Two sauceboats, each with two silver interiors Two vegetable dishes and covers, each with two silver interiors Two asparagus stands 16,200 gr. Case 16 A seven-piece tea and coffee service, comprising: hot-water urn on stand with lamp, tea pot, coffee pot, sugar bowl, cream jug, waste bowl, pair of sugar tongs Two large two-handled trays: 65.5 cm (25¾ in) and 77.5 cm (30½ in) wide 15,900 gr. Case 17 Four bread baskets 8,200 gr. Total weight of silver: 258,900 gr.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 1995-05-15
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THE EGREMONT SERVICE

THE EGREMONT SERVICE A GEORGE III SILVER DINNER-SERVICE LONDON, 1806 & 1807, MAKER'S MARK OF PAUL STORR With gadrooned borders chased at intervals with shells and acanthus foliage, engraved either once, or twice, with an Earl's armorials and sometimes a separate crest, comprising: Forty-two shaped-circular dinner-plates -- 11 in. (27.6 cm.) diam.; eight second-course dishes en suite -- 13 in. (33 cm.) diam; three others, larger -- 14 in. (35.9 cm.) diam.; another, larger -- 16 in. (41 cm.) diam.; a pair of shaped oval meat-dishes -- 13 in. (33.6 cm.) long; four others, larger -- 15 in. (38.7 cm.) long; two others, larger -- 17 in. (43.8 cm.) long; three others, larger -- 19½ in. ((49.9 cm.) long; four others, larger -- 20½ in. (52.7 cm.) long; a pair of oval mazarines on pad feet, pierced with scroll work, trelliswork and mullets -- 14 in. (34.9 cm.) long; another pair, larger -- 18 in. (46.3 cm.) long; twelve sauce-tureens and covers, each circular on gadrooned spreading foot, the plain body applied beneath the lip with a band of vertical fluting, the border matching the dishes in the set. The reeded handles spring from applied lions' mask. The flat stepped gadrooned cover with detachable ring handle formed as a coiled snake above a calyx of leaves within a beaded frame -- 7¼ in. (19 cm.) long; four circular vegetable-dishes and covers, the borders and covers en suite -- 10½ in. (27.3 cm.) diam.; four circular vegetable-dishes (no covers) -- 10½ in. (27.3 cm.); four oblong entree-dishes and covers -- 13 in. (33 cm.) long; two similar entree dishes and covers with slightly incurved sides -- 11 in. (28.5 cm.) long; four similar entree-dishes adn covers with incurved corners -- 11 in. (28.2 cm.) long; four oval entree-dishes en suite (no covers) -- 13½ in. (34.6 cm.) long

  • USAUSA
  • 1991-01-10
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A queen anne carved and figured mahogany tall case clock, peter stretch

Old dry surface; rich dark brown color.  Base molding, finials and side finial plinths of a later date; central finial plinth reduced in height; lacking majority of shaped crest flanking central plinth; right rear colonnette lacking on bonnet. This sale represents a rare opportunity to purchase one of the most important and remarkably preserved early Philadelphia tall-case clocks ever to come on the marketplace. The magnificent case, with its stately proportions and rare blind fretwork carving, houses an elaborate movement, with a silvered dial with Roman chapters, date aperture, a seconds hand and a phases of the moon mechanism. It is the most sophisticated tall-case clock known by Peter Stretch (1670-1746), the talented and influential early Philadelphia clockmaker and pioneer of the famous clockmaking family. A Quaker, Stretch was born in Leek, Staffordshire, England and probably trained with his uncle, Samuel Stretch, of Leek before immigrating to Philadelphia in 1702. He worked at a shop at the corner of Front and Chestnut Streets known as “Peter Stretch’s Corner” where he made clocks for many prominent Philadelphia families. He was a member of the Common Council of Philadelphia from 1708 until his death and was commissioned by the Council in 1717 to work on the town clock. His sons Thomas (d. 1765) and William (d. 1748) were also accomplished clockmakers and William received all of his father’s tools, imported clocks and unfinished clockworks upon his death (Brooks Palmer, The Book of American Clocks, New York, 1950, p. 286 and Jack Lindsey, Worldly Goods, Philadelphia, 1999, pp. 136-137). The wide range of the output of Peter Stretch illustrates his versatility as a craftsman. He made both thirty-hour and eight-day engraved brass movements with plain dials and single hands as well as those with a sweep second hand, a revolving moon dial, and musical works. Of the extant tall case examples, those dating earliest have cases with flat top hoods and square doors, others offer flat tops and arched doors while later clocks are housed in cases with domed tops, arched doors, and straight bracket feet. All reflect the changing tastes of Philadelphia patrons of the second quarter of the eighteenth century. The exceptional case of the present clock, with its sarcophagus top, baroque fretwork carving with unusual dragon motifs, flame finials, fluted colonnettes with Corinthian capitals, and arched door, represents the most fully developed Philadelphia interpretation of the form in the late Queen Anne style. It conforms in design to a popular local pattern and was probably made late in Stretch’s career.  A nearly identical clock now in the collection of Philadelphia’s Independence National Historic Park was originally advertised by the Tillou Gallery in The Magazine Antiques, October 1970 issue.  As advertised, the case housed a movement by John Burges, Gosport, and after careful restorations which appear to have been based on seeing The Magazine Antiques 1943 Kindig advertisement of the subject clock, the movement was switched out with what is believed to have been the original Peter Stretch movement. Other restorations include the upper portion of the bonnet and finials. Another closely related case with a movement by Stretch is in the collection of Bayou Bend and illustrated in David Warren, et al, American Decorative Arts and Paintings in the Bayou Bend Collection, Houston, 1998, no. F72, pp. 42-43. The Bayou Bend clock is also housed in a case with a sarcophagus top, arched door, colonnettes, and fretwork carving, although it lacks the elaborate details of the flame finials, carved Corinthian capitals and carved moldings found on the present clock. Another with a closely related case similar to the Bayou Bend example from the collection of H. Richard Dietrich, Jr. was included in the Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania exhibition held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from October 10, 1999 to January 2, 2000. The clock is illustrated in the accompanying exhibition catalogue by Jack Lindsey, Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1999, fig. 14, p. 9.  Additional related examples include three illustrated in The Magazine Antiques: one with a maple case illustrated in June 1954, p. 440, one with a similar dial pictured in November 1978, p. 841 and the Johnson family clock illustrated in October 1987, p. 652. Another with a plain sarcophagus top case is illustrated in William M. Hornor, Blue Book Philadelphia Furniture, 1977, pl. 34, p. 56.  A similar case housing a movement by William Stretch is in a private collection (see Lindsey, no. 64, pp. 146-147). Historically significant Philadelphia tall case clocks of this quality and rarity seldom come on the marketplace. A Rococo style example with a dial signed by Paul Rimbault of London and a case with carving attributed to Bernard and Jugiez was sold in these rooms, Important Americana, January 15, 16, and 18, 2004, sale 7959, lot 666 for $803,200, setting a world record for the form. Another Rococo style example with a movement by Jacob Godshalk and a case labeled by George Pickering was sold in these rooms, Masterpieces from the Time Museum, June 19, 2002, for $532,000.  One with a Godshalk movement and a case attributed to the Garvan carver originally owned by John and Elizabeth Bringhurst was sold in these rooms, Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, January 16-17, 1998, sale 7087, lot 519 for $442,500. All reflect the strength in the market for clocks of monumental importance.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-10-29
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THE ALTENSTETTER SERVICE

THE ALTENSTETTER SERVICE AN UNIQUE GERMAN RENAISSANCE BASSE-TAILLE ENAMELLED SILVER AND PARCEL-GILT BANQUETING SERVICE OF TWELVE KNIVES, TWELVE SPOONS, TWELVE SWEETMEAT-FORKS AND THREE SALT-CELLARS The unmarked knives each signed either D.A.F or D.A.F. for David Altenstetter fecit and one dated twice 1615, the spoons and forks, maker's mark of David Altenstetter, Augsburg, 1615-17, the salt-cellars, maker's mark possibly HZ in monogram, perhaps for Hieronymus Zainer, Augsburg, 1590-95, the enamel attributed to David Altenstetter Each piece enamelled in bright translucent colours comprising: a) Twelve table-knives with tapering handles of slightly shaped rectangular section with silver-gilt moulded borders and terminals of trefoil form with winged cherub's bust and scrolls to front and back, the silver handles enamelled with various urns, festoons, scrolling foliage, tassels and as follows: 1) one side with a trotting horse, the other with a figure of Father Time blowing a trumpet, signed D.A.F, 2) one side with a monkey with bag-pipes, the other with a grotesque figure blowing a musical instrument, signed D.A.F., 3) one side with a seated stag, the other with an exotic figure playing a violin to a snail with a dragonfly on his shoulder, signed D.A.F, 4) one side with a bird with wings outstretched, the other with a musical trophy, signed D.A.F., 5) one side with a seated spaniel, the other with trophy-of-arms, signed D.A.F., 6) one side with musical trophy, the other with a baboon, signed D.A.F., 7) one side with a monkey blowing a musical instrument, the other with a running squirrel, signed D.A.F., 8) one side with a vase of flowers and two butterflies, the other with a dancing bear, signed D.A.F., 9) one side with a musical trophy, the other with crouching monkey wearing a cloak, signed D.A.F., 10) one side with a winged dragon holding a snail with its claw, the other with a basket of flowers, signed D.A.F., 11) one side with a military trophy and a bat, the other with a squirrel eating a nut, signed D.A.F., 12) one side with a parrot, dated 1615, the other with an urn containing flowers, signed D.A.F. and dated 1615. the narrow side panels with foliage, flowers, husks and geometric ornament, the pointed steel blades each stamped with a cutler's mark of (?) an antler, one differing. Overall length approx. 9¼ in. (23.5 cm.) b & c) Twelve spoons with silver-gilt rat-tailed bowls and twelve sweetmeat-forks each with two silver-gilt prongs, with similar silver-gilt borders and terminals to the preceding, the silver handles of rectangular section, the front and back panels with similar motifs to the narrow side panels of the knives, the narrow side panels variously decorated with running scrolls, geometric ornament and foliage, the spoons marked on either side of the rat-tail, the sweetmeat-forks on the sloping shoulders. The spoons 7¼ in. (18.5 cm.), the forks 6¾in. (17cm.) long. d) Three square salt-cellars, each with silver-gilt moulded border to the base, upper border, corner pilasters and central circular well, the border to the well enamelled at the angles with four winged cherubs' busts two with six and one with three feather head-dresses, the four side panels variously enamelled with scrolling foliage, drapery, scrolls and as follows: 1) each of the panels with central cluster of varying fruits flanked by exotic birds, two with snails and two with dragonflies above, 2) two of the panels with similar central cluster of varying fruit flanked by exotic birds with butterflies above, the two other panels with musical trophies flanked by varying exotic birds, 3) each of the panels with central cluster of fruit, one flanked by winged dragons, one with rearing horses bedecked with saddlecloths, another with differing dragons and the forth with leaping stags. Each marked underneath. 2 7/8 in. (6.6 cm.) square All in late 18th Century brass-mounted, gilt-tooled and velvet-lined fitted leather case (39)

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2005-12-01
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A pair of royal german silver six-light candelabra, johann engelbrecht

Tri-form base cast and chased with Régence ornament, supporting rampant lions joyously holding bombs, on scroll brackets and enclosing fitted war trophies including cannons, cannon balls, rifles, pikes, armour, pistols and helmets, shaped circular stems applied with bearded masks with oak leaf hair rising to Prussian eagles flanking a crown and the cypher of Friedrich Wilhelm I, five scroll branches, detachable  campana nozzles and drippans, repeated at the finial forming the sixth light, engraved scratchweights 87M 12 and 87M 10,  fully marked The candelabra arrived in Berlin from Augsburg just in time for the wedding of Friedrich Wilhelms daughter Philippine Charlotte to Karl I, of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel.1  Philippine Charlottes wedding occurred on 2 july 1733, while on the 11th of the previous month, her brother Friedrich (Frederick the Great) was married to Karls sister Elizabeth Christine, thus establishing a double alliance, between the important Protestant houses of North Germany, Prussia and Brunswick. In the light of this, the Prussian eagles above Brunswick lions, who joyously hold instruments of war, might be seen as an image of the military alliance through marriage of these two states An original record of the order from Augsburg, was made by Johann Jacob Frings, master of the Augsburg mint (1725-1752). It was published in 1885, in an article by Julius Lessing who compiled his information from a number of 18th and 19th century sources. One pair of candelabra perfectly matches the description of the present pair. Listed separately from the other eight candelabra, they are recorded as: Zwei Gueridons mit Fechs [sic] Leuchtern, Adler, Kronen, Löwen und Kriegs armaturen..177 (Mark) 14 (Löth).2 Frings list, of silver produced or shipped during 1731-33 and brokered by the silver dealer Johann Balthasar II Gullmann and his son Johann Friedrich, comprised, 56 wall lights, 4 mirrors, 4 tables, 10 candelabra and 9 various pieces. One of the heaviest orders ever given to Augsburg goldsmiths,3 amounting to 35,597 marks in weight, equivalent to just under 8.5 metric tons of precious metal.4 5  It was, in the words of Paul Stetten writing in 1779, `Eine Fehr [sic] Große und Wichtige Bestellung (A very great and weighty order). Such magnificence was obligatory for the sovereign, as reassurance for his subjects and as a means of defying his rivals. The Hohenzollern had only recently attained royal status (1701) and Friedrich Wilhelm (1688-1740) with this massive display of silver, was reinforcing the message, of majesty, wealth and power, made at the end of the previous century by his father Friedrich, the First Prussian king (1657-1713). In the late 1690s, the latter had created a massive permanent wall-mounted silver buffet, opposite the throne, in the Rittersaal of the Berlin Schloss. (Stadtschloss) For the 1731-33 order instructions had been given to make the individual items as heavy as possible. These sculpted masses of precious metal, (the individual wall lights weighed over 100kg each), undoubtedly appealed to the particular nature of Friedrich Wilhelm. From the moment of his fathers interment in 1713, Friedrich set about reforming the state. Brutally honest and with little social grace, to him cutting costs was a moral obligation. Thomas Carlyle, biographer of his son Frederick the Great wrote: Yearly he made his country richer; and this not in money alone (which is of very uncertain value, and sometimes has no value at all, and even less), but in frugality, diligence, punctuality, veracity,--the grand fountains from which money, and all real values and valours spring for men. To Friedrich Wilhelm in his rustic simplicity, money had no lack of value; rather the reverse. To the homespun man it was a success of most excellent quality, and the chief symbol of success in all kinds. Yearly he made his own revenues, and his people's along with them and as the source of them, larger: and in all states of his revenue, he had contrived to make his expenditure less than it; and yearly saved masses of coin, and "reposited them in barrels in the cellars of his Schloss.6 Friedrich Wilhelm had also been impressed by what he saw during his visit his visit in 1728 to Dresden, as guest of his neighbour Augustus II, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony. Augustus had refurbished Dresden in 1718 for the marriage of his son to the daughter of the Hapsburg emperor, radically adding to the Saxon silver treasury and including his own wall mounted silver buffet which by 1728 had been enhanced and moved to the Green Vaults. Friedrich Wilhelms daughter Wilhelmine (1709-1758), mentions this rivalry in her memoirs, published in English in 1812. She was married to the margrave of Brandenburg-Bayreuth in November 1731 and in processing through the state rooms towards the Rittersaal of the Berlin Schloss, where the ceremony eventually took place, she wrote: the second room is still more superb; the pier glasses are of massy silver and the mirrors twelve foot in heightthe chandelier is much larger than in the first room and the furniture of each apartment increases proportionally in size. The last hall7 contains the largest pieces. Here are the portraits of the King and Queen, and those of the Emperor and Empress as large as life, in massy silver frames. The chandelier weighs 50,000 dollars (approx.175kg ); the globe is so large that a child of eight might conveniently sit in it. The plates (Wandleuchter/wall lights) are six feet high and the stands twelveThe King my father got all this plate after his first visit to Dresden. He had seen in that town the treasure of the King of Poland. He wishes to surpass that monarch and being unable to excel him in precious and rare stones, he bethought himself of getting what I have described that he might possess a novelty of which no sovereign of Europe had yet been possessed.8 Following melting of silver into coinage, in 1745, 1757 and 1809, to pay for Prussia/Brandenburg wars under Frederick the Great and reparations to France under Napoleon, all that remains of the huge order are the candelabra and a pair of pastry boxes.9 It is not know where the candelabra were first displayed after arrival in 1733, but around 1763 they had become part of the silver buffet in the Rittersaal of the Berlin Schloss. They were placed on the table of the cabinet Auf dem Schenktisch siehet,10  flanking the great wine fountain and cistern and taking part of the space formerly occupied by a pair of massive English wine coolers which were subjected to a war-related melting of silver in 1745.11 The Rittersaal Buffet These wine coolers, the size and shape of baths; at over 300kg for the pair, `two of the heaviest and most expensive presents supplied by the Jewel House,12  were a gift from Friedrich Is cousin by marriage, William III, King of Great Britain in 1694, and are believed to have provided inspiration for the construction of the silver Buffet in the Rittersaal (throne room) of the Berlin palace . This was a permanent floor to ceiling display, of modern silver-gilt from Augsburg, surrounded by, but outdoing older white silver pieces such as the royal English wine coolers. It providing a reflection opposite the throne, of the wealth, majesty and confidence of the elector of Brandenburg, who by the time it was permanently on display in 1703 had become Friedrich I, king in Prussia. The candelabra are recorded on the Rittersaal Buffet in an inventory of 1777 but were probably included by 1763 when the silver treasure returned from Magdeburg at the end of the Seven Years War.13 The treasure had been sent away for safekeeping in 1757, the year that Frederick the Great invaded Austria and while part of it was taken to the fortress at Magdeburg, for safekeeping, another part was melted, to pay for the war. Coupled with the previous melting of 1745 this had created gaps in the original Buffet silver. A coloured drawing of the buffet exists and although probably executed at the end of the 18th century is thought to show the position of Buffet silver items, after their return from Magdeburg in 1763. The candelabra are clearly visible on the ends of the cabinet table. (see detail) In the following inventory of 1793 the candelabra are again recorded on the Buffet of the Rittersaal, placed on either side of the older Great cistern and wine fountain and next to the pastry boxes by Johann Ludwig Biller II (weighing approximately 60kg. each), which had been part of the same 1731-33 order.14 During the Napoleonic period, Brandenburg/Prussia had to pay a war indemnity to France following defeat at Jena and considerable silver was melted n 1809, while the remaining treasure was taken to Königsberg in East Prussia for safekeeping. The Buffet silver was scheduled for melting at this point but was reprieved due to an intervention by Hofrat und Hofstaatssekretär Busseler with the king.15 After Waterloo, the treasure came back from Konigsberg and the candelabra are recorded in 1816, at the extreme end of the buffet table.16 In 1828 the court jeweller Johann Georg Humbert was contracted to clean and repair the buffet silver: it was at that time that the candelabra were inscribed with their then current weights.17 The buffet was painted in 1847 (see detail) and clearly shows the candelabra in their usual position. The painting also shows how the silver-gilt is framed by a border of white silver as it was originally. After World War I, an agreement was reached with the state, that silver which was architecturally part of the Stadtschloss such as the silver buffet should remain in the palace as state property. The agreement applied to the original late 17th century silver-gilt elements of the buffet, but included four of the six remaining pieces from the 1731-33 order because they were also silver-gilt.18 The candelabra being white, became private property after World War I, although they were still on the buffet in 1922.19 They were not taken to the Netherlands during the emperors exile (1919-1941) but were removed in 1944 to the familys ancestral home of Hohenzollern castle at Hechingen.20 Footnotes 1 Seelig in Quand Versailles était meublé..., op. cit., no. 48. 2 Lessing, op. cit., p. 132. 3 Silver and Gold, p. 30. 4 One Augsburg mark was equivalent to 236.2gr. 5 Stein, "Weights on Continental Silver", The Silver Society Journal, 1997, p. 571. 7 This `last hall is thought to refer to the Weisser Saal on the same floor as the Rittersaal in the Stadtschloss see: Kronschatz, op. cit., p. 90. 8 Memoirs of Frederica Sophia Wilhelmina, op. cit., vol. 1, pp. 352 and 353. 9 Staatl. Museen zu Berlin, Kunstgewerbemusuem, Schloss Köpenick; A pair of soup tureens with their spoons in the same museum but not recorded by Frings, are associated with this order. 10 Journal of the Silver Society, op. cit., p. 118. 11 PK Potsdam no. 40, cited by Keisch, op. cit. p. 190. 12 Glanville in Diplomats and Goldsmiths, op. cit. p. 119. 13 Keisch, op.cit., pp. 190-197. 14 Keisch, op.cit., pp. 190-191. 15 Keisch, op. cit., p. 36. 16 Keisch, op. cit., p. 194. 17 Keisch, op. cit., p. 37. 18 Private information. 19 Rosenberg, op. cit. 20 Private information.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2017-07-05
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The judge elbert h. gary gold service. an eighteen karat gold extensive

Each piece decorated with an Empire-style border of running leaf-tips, engraved with the initial G as a flowing ribbon, most pieces with fitted black leather boxes with green velvet interiors and stamped in gold with Tiffany & Co. and the items within, comprising: a) eighteen service plates: 487oz 4dwt (5,151.92g); d. 11in. (27.8cm) b) eighteen dinner plates: 432oz 8dwt (13,447.64g); d. 10 1/4 in. (26cm), in fitted box c) eighteen dessert plates: 322oz 8dwt (10,026.64g); d. 9in. 22.8cm), in fitted box d) eighteen cake plates: 194oz 12dwt (6,052.06g); d. 7 3/4in. (19.7cm), in fitted box e) eighteen bread and butter plates: 161oz 12dwt (5,025.76g); d. 6 3/8 in. (16.4cm), in fitted box f) eighteen ice cream dishes: 181oz (5.629g); d. 7in. (17.9cm), in fitted case g) eighteen finger bowls: 204oz 10dwt (6,359.95g); d. at rim 4 5/8 in. (11.9cm), in fitted box h) fourteen almond dishes: 83oz 4 dwt (2,587.52g), d. 4 1/2 in. (11.4cm); in two boxes i) fourteen salts: 35oz 12dwt (1,107.16g); diameter 3in. (7.7cm) in two boxes j) a flatware service: thirty-six dinner knives with gilt-metal blades: 147oz 12 dwt (4,590.36g) gross thirty-six dinner forks: 119oz 12dwt (3,719.56g) eighteen entrée knives with gilt-metal blades: 57oz 8dwt (1,785.14g) gross eighteen entrée forks: 54oz (1,679.4g) eighteen fish knives: 48oz 12dwt (1,511.46g) eighteen fish forks: 48oz (1,492.8g) eighteen oyster forks: 26oz 12dwt (827.26g) eighteen fruit knives: 40oz (1,244g) eighteen small salad forks: 28oz 16dwt (895.68g) eighteen ice cream forks: 27oz 16dwt (864.58g) eighteen ice cream spoons: 27oz 12dwt (858.36g) sixteen soup spoons: eighteen teaspoons: 30oz 12dwt (951.66g) eighteen coffee spoons: 15oz 4dwt (472.72g) eighteen salt spoons: 6oz 12dwt (205.26g) fourteen butter spreaders: 15oz 8dwt (478.94g) one pair sugar tongs: 1oz (31.1g) one mustard spoon: 14dwt (21.77g) one horseradish spoon: 1oz (31.1g) one oscar sauce spoon: 16dwt (24.88g) one cake knife: 10oz 16dwt (335.88g) one cake server: 7oz 16dwt (242.58g) one ice cream server: k) eighteen water goblets: 303oz 16dwt (9,448.18g), h. 6 3/4 in. (17.3cm), in fitted box for fourteen l) eighteen champagne goblets: 176oz 16dwt (5,498.48g), h. 4 3/4 in. (12.3cm), in fitted box m) a set of six table candlesticks with five detachable nozzles: 65oz (2,021.5g), h. 9 1/4 in. (23.6cm) n) two vases: 55oz 12dwt (1,729.16g), h. 10 1/2 in. (26.6cm) o) a fruit bowl: 55oz 8dwt (1,722.94g), d. 10in. (25.2cm) p) an ice cream plate , d. 13 1/2in. (34.5cm), in fitted box q) a cake stand: 60oz 16dwt (1,890.88g), d. 12 3/4 in. (32.5cm), in fitted box r) a centerpiece with pendant laurel ring handles, pierced flower grid with urn finial: 115oz (3,576.5g) excluding gilt-metal inner grid, d. 12 7/8in. (32.7cm), in fitted box s) four bonbon dishes: 30oz 8dwt (345.44g), d. 6 3/8 in. (16.1cm), in fitted box t) two cigar lighters, Roman lamp form: 29oz 4dwt (908.12g), l. 6 3/4 in. (17cm), in fitted box u) two ashtrays: 12oz 16dwt (398.08g), d. 5in. (12.7cm), in fitted box v) a hexagonal salver w) a cream jug Together with: x) twenty-four cut-glass casters, with 18 karat gold necks and slip-on covers, initialed G: the covers 10oz (311g), h. 3 1/2 in. (8.9cm) y) a syrup jug, matching the above, with 18 karat gold hinged cover, neck and handle, h. 4 7/8 in. (11.9cm) by Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, circa 1920, the glass by Stourbridge, all signed Hall except two casters signed M..y. 562 pieces total

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-05-19
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An important two-colour gold cagework boîte à miniatures

Pierre-Mathis de Beaulieu, charge and discharge marks of Jean-Baptiste Fouache, Paris, 1777, the front rim engraved: Ve George Beaulieu a Paris, the miniatures by Louis Nicolas van Blarenberghe, signed and dated:  van Blarenberghe 1777   of oval form, inset with six views of the Château de Bellevue and its gardens inhabited by courtly and rustic figures, gouache, framed within slender gold mounts chased with acanthus, the rim with green gold laurel above a polished band The miniatures show: on the lid: side elevation of the Château and terrace looking towards the pont de Sèvres front: la Cour Royale back: Bellevue from the Seine, showing the pavilion Brimborion in the foreground right: la petite Ménagerie left: le Bosquet du Baldaquin - this view was formerly considered to be signed: FROIET but the inscription can more logically be read as: PROJET base: the terrace of the Château looking down on the valley of the Seine towards Boulogne, with the skyline of Paris in the distance The Château de Bellevue was built by Madame de Pompadour in 1750 but was purchased by Louis XV, who had originally named it in honour of its beautiful view, in 1757. He made various alterations to the house which was enlarged by Jacques-Ange Gabriel. On his accession in 1774, Louis XVI gave the house to his aunts, Mesdames Adélaïde (patroness of van Blarenberghe),Victoire and Sophie, for whom presumably this box was made. In 1777, the year of this box, the ladies commissioned a model in relief of the park from Le Rey, as they were planning major ‘improvements’ (completed by 1785) including a jardin anglais and a new pavilion by Mique in the flower gardens for Madame Victoire who was the most passionate gardener. This might well explain the garden view apparently inscribed: Projet. Although Louis XVI was happier with his aunts at a slight distance from Versailles, their house was popular with visitors since the atmosphere was more relaxed than at court. This box appears to show the story of such a visit with the carriages of royal visitors, escorted by soldiers, arriving in the courtyard on the front. The same figures of elderly ladies, two children and a man wearing the sash of the Order of the St Esprit reappear several times admiring the view from the terrace and exploring the gardens. Sadly, the princesses were obliged to abandon Bellevue during the Terror but fled to Italy and survived. The château was confiscated and its grounds divided up with the house itself gradually pulled down after 1823. According to Monique Maillet-Chassagne, nine royal palaces are depicted in the views of the Blarenberghes, the family from Lille so well-known for their animated images of contemporary life. Naturally, those that were subsequently altered or destroyed such as Bellevue arouse the greatest interest. Dulaure’s Environs de Paris, 1786, describes the view as it was then: ‘The eye extends over immense plains, woods, villages and hills which close the horizon. The view of Paris and the Bois de Boulogne presents a striking contrast. The windings of the Seine, sometimes near, sometimes lost to view, then seeming to change its course on purpose to water the foot of the hills of Bellevue, thus to give more richness to the landscape’. Splendid as this sounds, how much more satisfying it is to be able to see the view itself on the base of this box. Pierre-François-Mathis de Beaulieu was apprenticed to the celebrated Parisian goldsmith, Jean George, in 1752 and became master in 1768, sponsored by Ange-Joseph Aubert, future joaillier du roi.  Beaulieu took over his former master’s business at the sign of l’Observatorie, on the quai des Orfèvres, by marrying Jean George’s widow, Jeane-Françoise Texier.  The association was famed for gold boxes and supplied many distinguished clients including Madame du Barry who paid 7,400 livres for “une tabatière et un souvenir” in 1771.  Although the Veuve George Beaulieu, as she was known, died in 1786, Beaulieu is recorded as remaining in business until 1791.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2005-11-29
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Annons

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Paire d'importantes terrines couvertes, leurs doublures et leurs présentoirs

Chacune, le présentoir ovale reposant sur quatre pieds boules sommés de rosettes, à bord mouluré de feuillages de chêne et glands avec des rubans, le marli orné d'une large frise de motifs de rosettes et de feuilles d'acanthe dans des losanges, les motifs dans des cadres ronds, l'ombilic souligné d'une frise de larges perles, la terrine ovale reposant sur un piédouche mouluré d'une large frise de fleurs d'acanthe sur fond amati, le corps riveté d'une frise de guirlandes de perles, d'épis de blé, de rubans et de rinceaux feuillagés entourant quatre médaillons hexagonaux représentant un caducée, un symbole de la vanité (un serpent enroulé autour d'un miroir), une clé entourée d'un ruban et un faisceau de licteur entouré de deux palmes, ainsi que deux cartouches appliqués d'armoiries timbrées d'une couronne princière à supports de léopards et de la devise PER MARE PER TERRAS, la doublure dorée à l'intérieur et gravée sur le côté d'armoiries d'alliance timbrées d'une couronne ducale Les armes d'alliance gravées sur les doublures des terrines sont celles de Tommaso di Somma, marquis di Circello et celles de sa femme née Ruffo di Calabria. Le marquis di Circello fut ministre des Affaires Etrangères du royaume des Deux-Siciles, il fut nommé ambassadeur à Vienne. En 1787, le diplomate est nommé à Paris. C'est probablement à cette occasion qu'il reçut du roi Louis XVI ces terrines en présent (cette hypothèse serait corroborée par la présence du poinçon "gratis" (une couronne royale pour 1768-1792) insculpé sur ces terrines. C'est aussi cette année-là qu'il fut décoré par son roi, Ferdinand I, de l'ordre de Saint-Janvier. La reine des Deux-Siciles, Caroline, étant la soeur de la reine Marie-Antoinette, la prise de la Bastille connut un retentissement particulièrement violent à la cour de Naples. En 1795, le marquis di Circello est envoyé comme ambassadeur à Londres. Lorsque, cinq ans plus tard, il quitte ce poste, il vend aux enchères son argenterie chez Christie's le 11 novembre 1801. La paire ici présentée est acquise par la maison Rundell and Bridge avec une autre paire similaire, mais circulaire, les quatre sous le numéro de lot 38. La paire de soupières circulaires fut alors vendue au roi George III puis dorée et appliquée aux armes royales. La paire de soupières ovales, celles présentées ici, fut acquise par Lord Macdonald of Slate qui fit à son tour appliquer ses armes. Ce sont celles que l'on peut voir ici. Le marquis di Circello, à son retour de Londres, devint ministre des Affaires Etrangères et s'éteignit en 1826. La paire achetée par George III fait aujourd'hui partie des collections de la reine d'Angleterre au château de Windsor. Elle est illustrée dans l'ouvrage de Alfred Jones, The Gold and Silver of Windsor Castle, 1911, page 94, dans Les Grands Orfèvres de Louis XIII à Charles X, page 271, dans le catalogue de l'exposition Versailles et les Tables Royales en Europe, 1993, p. 237 et dans le catalogue de l'exposition George III and Queen Charlotte, patronage collecting and court taste, Jane Roberts, London, 2004, ref. 362. Paul Storr s'inspira des motifs présents sur ces terrines pour les quatre soupières qu'il livra au duc de Cumberland en 1806-1807, vendues ensuite lors de la dispersion de la collection Plohn, Sotheby's Londres, 15 octobre 1970, lots 89 et 90. Alexander, deuxième baron Macdonald of Slate est issu d'une famille d'officiers originaire de l'île de Skye en Ecosse. En 1799, pour contrer l'invasion napoléonienne, il leva un régiment à Inverness qui sera dissous en 1802 à Fort George. Resté célibataire, il s'éteignit en 1824. Sur une des terrines, sous chacune des armes Macdonald se trouve gravé un chiffre romain, lequel chiffre est répété sur le corps, sous l'endroit où ces armes sont appliquées (sur une face VII, sur l'autre IIII). Sur l'autre terrine, il s'agit de la lettre F sur une face, G de l'autre. En fait, en démontant chacun des motifs hexagonaux sertis sur la frise du corps, on remarque d'autres chiffres sur l'une et d'autres lettres sur l'autre, prouvant qu'il s'agit là d'indications de montage de l'orfèvre. L'espace vacant que l'on découvre sous les armoiries plaquées prouve encore que, dès l'origine, Henry Auguste avait prévu des armoiries en applique et non gravées. Le modèle de ces terrines est à rapprocher d'un dessin attribué à JJ Boileau conservé au Victoria and Albert museum de Londres. L'ornemaniste se serait sans doute inspiré de ces terrines pour réaliser son dessin. En effet Boileau s'est installé à Londres au début des années 1790 et a collaboré à plusieurs reprises avec la maison Rundell & Bridge qui acquiert ces terrines en 1801. Pour une terrine très proche de celles présentées ici, mais insculpée du poinçon de William Pitts, Londres, 1801, aux armes de la famille Gordon, d'Ecosse, voir Sotheby's New York, 20 avril 1983, n° 250.

  • CHESchweiz
  • 2005-11-16
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A HIGHLY IMPORTANT SICILIAN SILVER TABLE FOUNTAIN

A HIGHLY IMPORTANT SICILIAN SILVER TABLE FOUNTAIN MAKER'S MARK OF GIUSEPPE D'ANGELO, MESSINA, CIRCA 1670 Based on Giovanni Angelo Montorsoli's fountain of Orion in Messina, the stepped octagonal base raised on four cast figures of sea horses, their front hooves raised, their hind quarters covered in scales and terminating in scrolls, with chased wild masks applied at the angles between, chased with a border of alternating stylized acanthus and water leaves, the broad surface flat-chased with geometric bands of lozenges, flowerheads and circles on a matted ground, applied with four cast figures of putti astride sea monsters, their tails scrolling over the putti's back, two blowing a horn (the other two lacking), applied between these with four shells headed by two wild lion masks, the stem formed of four cast tritons above knops chased with ovolo and dentilation, tritons with scrolling fish tails, standing against a gilt-metal background, their arms folded above their heads and holding aloft a circular dish, the lower part chased with bands of foliate scrolls and flowerheads on a mattedground enclosing a calyx of radiating flutes with four wild mask spouts at intervals, the interior chased with a band of dentilation and engraved within a band of stylized shells, the stem continuing above this with a ribbed knop set with four cherub head spouts and a spool-form plinth on which are seated four cast nude water goddesses with small sea monsters between, holding aloft a smaller dish with conforming decoration and wild mask spouts, the finial formed as four cast naked caryatids with lion masks between, supporting a spool-form plinth on which stands the cast figure of a naked putto subduing a sea monster and blowing a horn, with copper core to stem and wood core to base, struck with Messina town mark and maker's mark GIOS D'ANG on base, four horses, wild masks, flange under tritons, both dishes, carytids and finial 22in. (56cm.) high, gross weight 195 oz. (6065gr.)

  • USAUSA
  • 1996-04-17
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An important louis xvi four-color gold funambulist automaton snuff

The top mounted under a glazed cover with a tightrope dancer in feathered headdress and tonnelet skirt, who balances with a pole as he dances on a taught wire, making fifteen different actions in one sequence; his legs kick to each side and he does the splits as he bounces up and down in time to a popular air sounding on a carillon of five nesting bells; he performs on a chased and polished gold Berainesque stage of columns spaced with draped urns on finely matted ground, the base mirroring the stage but centered by a chased maened balancing on a globe and clashing cymbals; the base hinged for access to the snuff compartment, the sides pierced and chased en suite with complex swags, pendent baskets and full-faced masks at intervals, the rim of the cover chased with urns linked by festoons to oval classical profile medallions, the start and stop buttons partially concealed in the design of the side; the movement hinged into the case, skeletonized and finished in gilt metal and polished steel, case maker's mark struck three times inside snuff compartment, maker and date letter on cover, maker charged and dated inside, the rim of base with discharge mark for 1783-9, the main spring signed Monginot le Jne. fbre. 1785 The only other known automaton snuff box of a tightrope dancer is now in the Gilbert Collection, Somerset House, London, formerly in the Collection of Henry Ford II, sold Sotheby's, New York, 25 February 1978, lot 4.  This was marked with the case maker's mark of M&P of Geneva. Augustin-André Héguin entered his mark 20th April 1785, sponsored by the well-known box maker Jean-Joseph Barrière. His address until 1789 was Place Dauphine; from 1790 to 1793 he is recorded at rue de la Barillerie; in 1806 he is listed for “le gros et le petit bijou” at rue de la Monnaie 11. A gold box by him set with a miniature of Louis XIV attributed to Jean Petitot is in the Royal Scottish Museum, illus. Clare le Corbeiller, European and American Snuff Boxes 1730-1830, no. 229. A bonbonière with portrait of Marie-Antoinette is at Musée de Louvre, illus. Serge Grandjean, Catalogue des tabatières et étuis des XVIII et XIX siècles du musée du Louvre, p.298.  An erotic automaton snuff box by Héguin was sold Sotheby’s, Hong Kong, 26 October, 2005 lot 1638 and a similar one Sotheby’s Geneva 14 May 1987, lot 144 (CHF 401,500).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-10-23
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THE ROCKINGHAM EWER AND SIDEBOARD DISH

THE ROCKINGHAM EWER AND SIDEBOARD DISH By David Willaume, 1726, Britannia Standard A MAGNIFICENT GEORGE I INVERTED HELMET-SHAPED EWER AND SHAPED CIRCULAR SIDEBOARD DISH. The ewer on spreading circular foot and with octagonal baluster stem, each chased with panels of trelliswork, strapwork, shells and acanthus leaf ornament on a matted ground, the lower part of the body applied with pierced strapwork on a broad matted ground and above with moulded rib, coat-of-arms and further rosette and acanthus scrolled pediment, surmounted below the broad curved lip by Venus' shell framed mask, the leaf-capped demi-lyre bracket handle applied with guilloche ornament and with bearded-mask thumb piece The shaped circular sideboard dish with applied outer border, chased with rosettes and lozenge panels on a scalework ground between alternating acanthus leaves and foliate scrolls, the inner applied border chased with similar panels of scalework, shells and acanthus leaf foliage on a matted ground and circular medallions of ancient heroes and their spouse, alternating with baldequin swags embellished with festive satyrs surmounted by acanthus wrapped shells, the centre applied with a detachable cast and chased coat-of-arms within a Baroque cartouche height of ewer 15in. (38cm.) diameter of dish 25½in. (64.8cm.) (weight of ewer 117ozs.) (weight of dish 317ozs.) (total weight 435ozs.) The arms are those of Watson-Wentworth impaling Finch for Thomas, later 1st Marquess of Rockingham, K.B. and his wife Mary, 4th daughter of Daniel, 7th Earl of Winchelsea, whom he married in 1716 (2)

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 1991-11-27
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An highly important pair of french silver wine coolers, robert-joseph

Engraved with the arms of Earl Harcourt within drapery cartouches above applied bold swags of fruiting vine pendent from goat's heads, the horns rising to form handles, acanthus leafage below matted girdles above the guilloche-bordered bases inscribed on the rims Auguste F. A Paris, the footrims hallmarked 1767/68, also No 1 and 2 with scratchweight 110=6 and No 2 and 3 with scratchweight 112=14 Lord Harcourt’s wine coolers of 1766/67 appear to be the earliest recorded example of this model. Made well before the accession of Louis XVI in 1774 they exemplify the Louis XVI style that came to dominate for a time the look of silver in France and internationally. In the words of Henri Bouilhet '...on peut dire, néanmois, qu’Auguste résume et caractérise L’Orfèvrerie de l’époque Louis XVI. Il en est, pour ainsi dire, la personnification’ 1. Considering his success and position (Orfèvre du Roi on 23 March 1775 with responsibility for all official silver 2) surprisingly little has been written about Robert-Joseph Auguste who `awaits his archivist and biographer’3. He registered a silver mark at the relatively late age of 34 in 1757 but had worked during the previous ten years for other goldsmiths and for the king. Three years before registering his mark he was described as modeleur-ciseleur and in the almanach Dauphin as un des plus habile cizeleurs en bijoux de bas-relief 4. In 1755 Auguste made the gold salt and pepper for Madame de Pompadour representing un Hollandois qui present une huître and un paysan qui tient un sac, possibly after his own models and not those of Maurice Falconet as is generally believed 5. When these were sold publicly in 1777 they were described as de bon goût & de la plus parfait exécution par M. Auguste 6. To name the author in a sale catalogue of the time was considered a mark of particular distinction. By 1777 Auguste had notably completed the crown jewels for Louis XVI’s coronation and a large silver service for George III, while beginning the formidable Russian commissions which were to continue until the early 1780s. He had become so successful that in 1778 during the month of April alone silver from the Auguste workshop taken to the gardes for weighing and control amounted to 4000 marcs by weight 7, nearly 1000 kilos and over 100 times the weight of the present wine coolers. It hadn’t always been so good. After an explosive start to his career with the silver tureens for Christian VII of Denmark in the late 1750s, by the time the Harcourt wine coolers were hallmarked in 1766, Auguste seems to have been emerging from a relatively difficult period. This was caused by the Seven-Years-War which dragged silver to the melting pot, but was made worse by financial problems, the result of calls on the debts of others like the king’s jeweller Claude Dominique Rondé, which he had guaranteed. Auguste appears to have produced little work and almost no silver for a number of years. Two gold boxes survive from this period (Hermitage, St. Petersburg 1760-61; and the Louvre 1762-63 8). Like his contemporary François-Thomas Germain, Auguste also made gilt-bronze items such as candle branches for the royal palace of Choisy (1756) and table borders for Madame de Pompadour’s brother the Marquis de Marigny (1759) 9. A Gold chalice and patten for the Dauphine also remains from this period. As a result of Auguste’s financial straits it was removed from his workshop by the authorities before completion and given to François-Thomas Germain for safekeeping. Eventually Auguste was allowed to finish it and, signed and dated 1760, it was presented to the Empress in Vienna before arriving at its intended destination, the parochial church in Radmirje, Slovenia in 1763. The end of Auguste’s period of relative inactivity coincided with François-Thomas Germain’s bankruptcy in 1765. Auguste was particuarly well connected and his circle included people associated with the change in style from rococo to early neo-classicism, which effected the decorative arts. The Marquis de Marigny, Charles-Nicolas Cochin polemicist for change, and Jacques-Germain Soufflot architect of the Pantheon, attended Auguste’s marriage 10; as did the antiquarian comte de Caylus and Madame de Geoffrin whose salon was frequented by Voltaire and his circle. A letter from Cochin to Marigny in 1765 commends Auguste above his contemporaries. `Il ne pârait maintenant de distingué dans cet art (L’orfèvrerie) que M. Auguste, tous les autres étant plutôt des marchands qui presentent sous leur nom les ouvrages de bons ouvriers que des gens capable d’éxecuter eux-mêmes’. This comment made in the year of F-T Germain’s bankruptcy, throws light on Auguste’s working practice and contributes something to the belief that he was a sculptor (as well as a designer and chaser). The comment was probably influenced by the level of sub-contracting undertaken by certain high profile goldsmiths like Germain, rather than distaste for the practice itself, which was common and necessary in the trade. It is interesting to note the comments of Yves Carlier who believes that when a piece of silver was signed as in fait par FT Germain Sculp. Orfr. du Roy, or Auguste F. A Paris, as are the present wine coolers, this was not about who made it 12, but who was the `owner-perhaps copyright holder in modern terms- of a model, not necessarily its author’ 13. The present pair of wine coolers are thought to be the earliest recorded example of this model. A pair with horned satyr mask handles from the Ekaterinoslav service, now in the Gulbenkian museum Lisbon 14, were made in the following year in 1767/68. Copies with goat’s head handles from the Portuguese royal orders exist in the Ajuda Palace and the Museum of Ancient Art Lisbon, both of which are dated 1778/79 15. Two pairs of 1778-79 with the arms of the Duke of Cadaval were sold Christie's Geneva, 27 April 1975 and 8 Nov 1977, lots 106 and 305 respectively. A goat’s head pair with the addition of a Bacchus mask, dated 1777, and with later German bases were part of the George III service, sold Sotheby’s Monaco, 27 November 1979 lot 840. A set of four 1775/76 from the same service are at Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (Rothschild family trust). A single example of 1776/77 from the Ekaterinoslav service is illustrated by Bjorn Kommer Zirbelnuss und Zarenadler, Augsburger Silber für Katharina II von Russland, Munich/Berlin, 1997, p. 75; and a pair of 1778, part of the Kazan or Nijegorod services were illustrate by Henry Nocq page 32. (see: literature)  Simon Ist Earl Harcourt (1714-1777) was grandson of Queen Anne's Lord Chancellor, created Ist Baron Harcourt of Stanton Harcourt in 1710 and Ist Viscount Harcourt in 1721. The estate of Stanton Harcourt near Oxford was added to by the purchase of nearby Nuneham Court from the Earl of Wemyss by the Ist Earl Harcourt's father in 1710. Simon Harcourt  finished his education with four years travelling abroad and returned home to be appointed Lord of the Bedchamber to George II aged 22 in 1735. Towards the end of this appointment in 1749, having been with the king at the battle of Dettingen he was created Viscount Nuneham and Ist Earl Harcourt, and soon afterwards Governor to the Prince of Wales in 1751. Writing to Lord Harcourt from Saville House about his history lessons, the young prince observed that Richard II was a poor ruler `They were in hopes that he would have made a good King; but they soon lost their hopes , for he loved flatterers who are the greatest serpents a Court can have...''  After the prince had become king he sent Lord Harcourt to Mecklenburg-Strelitz  to escort his bride Charlotte Sophia back to England. The Earl took a portrait miniature of the King with him  `richly and most prettily set round with diamonds'  At the royal marriage Lord Harcourt's daughter Lady Elizabeth was one of the Queen's bridesmaids `dressed in white and silver' and wearing a diamond coronet. Lord Harcourt accepted the appointment of Ambassador to Paris in 1768, and set out from his London home in Cavendish square on 3 January of the following year. A week later he had his first audience with Louis XVI at Versailles 16. It is not known exactly when Lord Harcourt acquired these wine coolers but it is almost certain they were in his possession before the indenture plate of 1768/69, which was granted to him as ambassador to Paris, and which included the English copies of these coolers marked by Parker & Wakelin in 1768 (see lot 197). This plate amounting to approximately 7000oz., was delivered to his goldsmith, Parker & Wakelin by their various suppliers in early 1769 (February and March). Approximately 2000oz identifiable as being part of this ambassadorial grant and invoiced to the Earl on 13 March 1769, was sold in 1993 17. The fact that it was all in French style was almost certainly not because Lord Harcourt had been appointed ambassador to Paris but because the French led fashion in most things including silver. Other English copies were made of French items in the Earl's possession. These include the Thomas and William Chawner service of spoons and forks of the same year, which are copies of a service made by Françoise-Thomas Germain in 176718. The Earl continued to purchase Auguste’s work and have it copied in England during his period as ambassador. For example a pair of fluted candlesticks of 1771 were copied in 1772 by Thomas Pitts, principal supplier to Parker & Wakelin 19.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2003-11-20
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A monumental pair of george iii silver-gilt sideboard dishes, after

The centre of each cast in bold relief with a group of Bacchus and Ariadne with cherubs flying about their shoulders, drawn forward in an ornamental chariot by four centraurs weilding a thyrsus or playing a double-pie, a lyre and a tambourine, further decorated with an applied ribbon-tied laurel wreath below the massive vine and trellis border strewn with cymbals and other antique musical instruments, the reverse engraved with a coat-of-arms, supporters and motto below a dukes coronet, one stamped: RUNDELL BRIDGE & RUNDELL AURIFICES REGIS ET PRINCIPIS WALLIAE REGENTIS BRITANNIAS, in their original case This is the only pair from the series of Bacchus and Ariadne sideboard dishes created by the workshop of Paul Storr for the royal goldsmiths Rundell, Bridge & Rundell. It is also the earliest, made in 1813 and purchased by William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley, 4th Earl of Mornington (1788-1857), nephew of the Duke of Wellington. A single example of 1814 was purchased by the Prince Regent, future King George IV, and is now in the Royal Collection.1 A fourth example was made in 1817, bearing the arms of the 2nd Earl of Ailesbury, and was part of the Audrey Love Collection.2 The royal goldsmiths Rundell, Bridge & Rundell are synonymous with the Imperial style in silver and silver-gilt which reflected the new pride and prosperity of Britain during the Napoleonic wars. Although in large part influenced by the French emperor's predilection for dazzling display, and for gold, this new sculptural fashion in precious metal was nonetheless entirely British. Drawing on classical motifs from Greek and Roman architecture, the style celebrated massiveness, which had been advocated as the `principal characteristic of good Plate' by the architect and designer Charles Heathcote Tatham (1772-1842) in 1806. Rundell's, as the largest and most successful supplier of plate, diamonds, pearls and jewellery of the period, drove the fashion for monumental silverware. Joseph Nightingale said The shop of Messrs. Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, Jewellers, &c. exceeds, perhaps, all others in the British Empire, if not the whole world, for the value of its contents.3 The sculptural qualities of silver and silver-gilt were exploited, not only on the table but also for sumptuous displays of buffet plate. The firm had realized early on that in order to undertake such ambitious work, and to keep its designs exclusive, it needed to have its own workshops and design studios. Their ensuing success meant that, unprecedented for the time, they were able to produce works of art on a speculative basis, and, led by the Prince Regent, the aristocracy, clamoured to buy them from Rundell's premises on Ludgate Hill. It was a startling reversal of the traditional roles of patron and supplier, and it places Rundell's among the most innovative businesses of the 19th Century. Key to its success in the manufacture of the best in silver and silver-gilt, Rundells employed a number of talented artists to supply designs and oversee production. First among these was the sculptor William Theed (1764-1817) who was instrumental in setting up the firms first silver factory. Thereafter the sculptor John Flaxman (1755-1826) whose most important work for Rundells was the remarkable silver-gilt Shield of Achilles of 1821. Flaxmans friend the English painter, illustrator and engraver Thomas Stothard (1755-1834), was another important member in the firms creative circle. A prolific and inventive artist, Stothart provided on a freelance basis many drawings and sketches for Rundells, comprising entire schemes as well as decorative details. Stothards design for this pair of sideboard dishes (see illustration) was thought to have been his own composition based on his biographers words: he 'chose for his subject Bacchus and Ariadne, drawn in a chariot by Satyrs. This was imagined and delineated with true classic taste and feeling'.4 This design was in fact inspired by an antique Roman cameo discovered in the Via Aurelia in 1661, published shortly after,5 and now in the Louvre having been seized by Napoleon in 1798 (see illustration). The success of Stothard's design led him to be commissioned to design the Wellington Shield, presented to the 1st Duke of Wellington by the Merchants and Bankers of the City of London in 1822 and still in the Wellington collection (Apsley House). William Pole-Wellesley, 4th Earl of Mornington (1788-1857) and nephew of the 1st Duke of Wellington, was considered as a most unworthy representative of the honour of the elder branch of the House of Wellesley. A notorious scoundrel, gambler and fortune-seeker, he won the hand of Catherine Tylney-Long, the richest woman in England outside of royalty, with an income of £80,000 a year. After their marriage in 1812, he absorbed the brides estate and became William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley. They moved to Wanstead House where he organised extravagant festivities, notably stag hunts or after-midnight dinners with guests he brought back from the opera in London.6 In 1814, Long-Wellesley held a grande fete to celebrate the Duke of Wellingtons victory over Napoleon. It is most likely that he purchased the present pair of monumental dishes for this specific occasion. Among the guests were the Prince Regent himself who would have admired the dishes and probably decided to acquire his own version at the time. This was purchased the following year from Rundell, Bridge & Rundell and joined the Royal Buffet.7 A drawing of 18448 and then a photograph from the early 20th century9 show the sideboard dish in the centre at the top of buffet in St George's Hall, Windsor Castle. To secure a debt of £250,000, Long-Wellesley mortgaged Wanstead House and contents to his creditors; but in 1822, he had to flee to Europe while the trustees of the settlement auctioned off the house's contents in an auction lasting 32 days.10 During that auction Rundell, Bridge & Rundell acquired some silver items such as an important nautilus cup on behalf of the Prince Regent, now in the Royal Collection.11 The goldsmiths also bought the present pair of sideboard dishes, probably on behalf of Hugh Percy (1785-1847), 3rd Duke of Northumberland,12 whose arms were then engraved on the reverse. The Duke had previously purchased from the goldsmiths in July 1822 one of the splendid shields of Achilles designed and modelled by John Flaxman. Unlike the first owner of these sideboard dishes, the Duke was a much admired and respected man. He was sent to France in May 1825 as the extraordinary ambassador at the coronation of Charles X where he defrayed the expenses out of his private purse and was everywhere received with marked attention.13 In 1829, he was appointed Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland and subsequently created Knight of the Garter. As a private individual, the Duke was also deservedly respected. His immense income was employed munificently [] His charities were as princely as they were unostentatious; and instances without number might be cited in which his acts of kindness were performed with a delicacy and grace which much enhanced their value.14 He also played a part in the development of football at a time when it was a controversial game by providing a field for the annual Alnwick Shrove Tuesday match and presenting the ball a ritual that continues to this day. The dishes stayed in the Percy family until they were sold at auction in 1984, together with the Shield of Achilles.15 Footnotes 1 RCIN 51654. 2 Sold Christies New York, 19 October 2004, lot 239. 3 Joseph Nightingale, London and Middlesex, London, 1815, vol. III, p. 631. 4 Anna Eliza Bray, Life of Thomas Stothard, R.A.: with Personal Reminiscences, London, 1851. 5 It was engraved by F. Buonarotti in 1698 and included in Bernard de Montfaucon's L'Antiquité expliquée of 1719. 6 http://wansteadhouse.com/customers/content/wansteadhouse/timeline.aspx. 7 The royal dish, with date letter 1814, was purchased in 1815 from Rundell, Bridge & Rundell for £497 7s. 7d., to which was added 18s. for engraving the Royal Arms and £188 for the gilding. 8 https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/object.asppagesize=20&detail=scrapbook&object=51654&row=4608&scrapbook=14028. 9 https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/object.asppagesize=20&detail=scrapbook&object=51654&row=4608&scrapbook=14029 10 Long-Wellesley died in lodgings in Thayer Street, Manchester Square, London, from a stroke so sudden that the deceased had one egg; which he was partaking from, in his hand when he was seized with the fatal attack. The Morning Chronicle, London, Saturday 4 July 1857, p. 5d. 11 Number RCIN 50603. John Flaxmanbelieved to be by Cellini but the maker was then identified as Nikolaus Schmidt. The cup, lot 331 in the Wanstead House sale, was purchased on 18 June 1822 by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell (£120); by whom sold to George IV, 1823 (250 gns; RA GEO/26060). 12 Rundell, Bridge and Rundell rendered account of the purchase as follows: on Rundells account dated 21st, 22nd and 29th June, their cost was £252 7s. for one and £255 3s. for the other, calculated at 14s. per ounce. The same document indicates their origin by specifying immediately afterwards charges of £6 17s. and 7s. 6d. respectively to Paid Expenses to Wanstead 3 days, attending Sale and Carriage of Plate home, and Paid Cartage and assistance. 13 He received a diamond-hilted sword from the French King. 14 The NewCastle Courant, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Friday 12 February 1847, p. 4c. 15 See Sothebys London, 3 May 1984, lot 124.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2017-07-05
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A rare book-shaped pearl-set gold and enamel musical automaton snuff

A rare book-shaped pearl-set gold and enamel musical automaton snuff box with watch and vinaigrette the movement apparently unsigned, the case with makers' mark of Sene & Neiser, Geneva, circa 1805-1808 of rectangular book form, three sides enamelled in translucent scarlet over reeding to simulate the pages, the spine divided into four sections each framed by pearls and decorated in taille d'epargne enamelling with trophies of Gardening and Plenty, one end section concealing a vinaigrette with scroll-pierced grille, the other a watch with white enamelled outer ring and arabic numerals, the two central sections opening together to form a key compartment, the hinged covers painted en plein in opaque enamels against a translucent blue sunrayed ground within borders of trailing vines with pearl-set grapes and green-enamelled leaves, the back cover with a peaceful still life of mellow fruits, flowers and an antique urn, the front cover with a restless leopard tensely poised for action, the upper lid opening to reveal a magical theatrical temple dedicated to Music and chased in four-colour golds over an enamelled ground painted with luxuriant verdure: as music plays the spiral glass columns and architrave scintillate with changing colours, the sun spins in the pediment and in the centre of the peristyle double doors open to reveal an articulated dancer and musician perform before a 'gothick' backdrop that slides to reveal an inner sanctuary with a flaming altar to Love width 8.4 cm, 3 1/4 in Quantity: 1

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2000-11-09
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THE GLADSTONE DINNER-SERVICE A GEORGE IV SILVER DINNER-SERVICE

THE GLADSTONE DINNER-SERVICE A GEORGE IV SILVER DINNER-SERVICE MOST WITH MARK OF PAUL STORR, LONDON, 1824 a.) A Pair of Six-Light Candelabra Each on tricorn base with hairy lion's paw feet, engraved on one side with the Gladstone arms, on another with an inscription and on the third with the Liver bird, with six reeded branches and a central foliage cast finial, each marked on base, sockets, wan-pans, nozzles, finial and both tiers of branches, the bases further stamped 'Storr & Mortimer New Bond Street' 27¼ in. (69.2 cm) high 429 oz. 18 dwt. (13,370 gr.) b.) A Pair of Soup-Tureens and Covers Each bombé oval and on foliage capped paw feet, the detachable covers with foliage handles, with conforming plain liners, one side engraved with the Gladstone arms, the other with an inscription, the covers and liners engraved with the Gladstone crest, each marked under base, inside cover, on liner and handle 15 3/8 in. (39 cm.) wide over handles 343 oz. 18 dwt. (10,697 gr.) c.) A Set of Four Entrée-Dishes, Covers and Handles and Old Sheffield Plated Stands Each oblong with gadrooned borders, the domed covers with foliage handles, each engraved on the dish and cover with an inscription, further engraved on the cover with the Gladstone arms and on the dishes with the Gladstone crest, on conforming stands, each marked on dish, inside cover and on handle the stands 14¼ in. (36 cm.) wide over handles d.) A Set Of Four Entreé-Dishes, Covers and Handles and Old Sheffield Plated Stands Each circular with gadrooned borders, the domed covers with foliage handles, each engraved on the dish and cover with an inscription, further engraved on the cover with the Gladstone arms and on the dishes with the Gladstone crest, on conforming stands, each marked on dish, inside cover and on handle the stands 13½ in. (34 cm.) wide over handles 232 oz. 18 dwt. (7,244 gr.) e.) A Set Of Four Wine-Coolers, Collars And Liners Modelled on the Warwick-vase, each on square base and with fruiting grapevine cast borders, engraved on one side with the Gladstone arms and on the other with an inscription, the collars and liners each engraved with the Gladstone crest, each marked near handles, on liner and collar the bases further stamped 'Storr & Mortimer New Bond Street' 9¾ in. (25 cm.) high 13 in. wide over handles 511 oz. 2 dwt. (16,209 gr.) f.) Two sets of Four Salt-Cellars and spoons, one set 1829 Each circular and on lion mask-capped paw feet, one set engraved with the Gladstone arms the other set engraved with the Gladstone crest, with eight King's Husk pattern salt-spoons, engraved with the Gladstone crest, by Mary Chawner, London, 1828-1837, marked under salts and on spoons The salt-cellars 3½ in. (9 cm.) diam. and slightly smaller 56 oz. 6 dwt. (1,753 gr.) g.) A Set Of Four Sauce-Tureens And Covers Each bombé circular and on four foliage-capped paw feet, with gadrooned rims, the detachable covers with foliage finials, each engraved with the Gladstone crest, the covers each engraved with Gladstone crest, each marked underneath, inside covers and on handles 8¼ in. (21 cm.) wide over handles 153 oz. 8 dwt. (4,772 gr.) h.) A Pair of Second-Course Dishes Each shaped circular with gadrooned rim, engraved with the Gladstone arms and an inscription, each marked under border 17 in. (43 cm.) diam. 132 oz. 16 dwt. (4,130 gr.) i.) A Graduated Set of Ten Meat-Dishes Mark of John Houle, London, 1824 Each shaped oval with gadrooned rim, engraved with the Gladstone arms and with an inscription, each marked under rim one 23¼ in.(59.8 cm.) wide one 22¼ in. (56.5 cm.) wide two 20 in.(51 cm.) wide two 18¼ in. (46.4 cm.) wide two 16¼ in. (41 cm.) wide two 15 in. (38 cm.) wide 706 oz. 2 dwt. (21,963 gr.) j.) A Pair of Salvers Each shaped circular and on four foliage-capped feet, with gadrooned rim, engraved with the Gladstone arms and with an inscription 23¾ in. (60.4 cm.) diam. 329 oz. 14 dwt. (10,254 gr.) k.) A Seven-Piece Tea and Coffee-Service Each piece chased with foliage scrolls on a matted ground, engraved on one side with the Gladstone arms, the other with Gladstone crest, comprising: a coffee-pot, stand and lamp, a teapot; a jug, stand and lamp, each with ivory insulated handle; two sugar bowls and two cream jugs, one by John Samuel Hunt, London, 1862 the coffee-pot, stand and lamp 12½ in. (31.7 cm.) high gross weight 190 oz. 12 dwt.(5,928 gr.) gross weight 3,349 oz. 3 dwt. (104,078 gr.) The arms are those of Gladstone impaling Robertson, for Sir John Gladstone (1764-1851) and his second wife Anne MacKenzie, the daughter of Andrew Robertson, who he married in 1800. The inscription on the candelabra reads 'TO JOHN GLADSTONE ESQUIRE, M.P. THIS SERVICE OF PLATE WAS PRESENTED FEBRUARY MDCCCXXIV BY HIS FELLOW TOWNSMEN AND FRIENDS TO MARK THEIR HIGH SENSE OF HIS SUCCESSFUL EXERTIONS FOR THE PROMOTION OF TRADE AND COMMERCE AND IN ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF MOST IMPORTANT SERVICE RENDERED TO THE TOWN OF LIVERPOOL' The inscription on the other pieces reads 'TO JOHN GLADSTONE ESQUIRE M.P. FROM HIS FELLOW TOWNSMEN AND FRIENDS LIVERPOOL 1824' (57)

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2013-07-04
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A large italian parcel-gilt silver torah crown

Of exceptional size, deeply embossed, chased and pierced with rococo scrolls, fruit and flowers under baldachinos applied with emblems including menorah, Tablets of the Law, priestly garment and temple, and applied with blessings, also applied with three-dimensional flowers. Base rim marked by Andrea Zambelli, "L'Honnesta," active 1732-72 and assay master Zuanne Premuda, active 1719-49; the emblems marked MP below lion of San Marco (Piero Pazzi no. 580 or 581). This crown is exceptional for its size and for the depth of its chasing.  The maker, Andrea Zambelli, also created a pair of pinecone-form Torah finials that are part of the trove of Judaica recently rediscovered under a staircase in the Ghetto of Venice and restored through Venetian Heritage, exhibited Sotheby's New York, December 2012-January 2013.  He also contributed to a monstrance in the Church of San Salvador, Venice, 1767-69, suggesting at least a partial speciality in religious silver. The Hebrew inscription translates as, "a crown of glory, and a diadem of beauty [Isaiah 28-5], given from the heart in the spirit of generosity by the important and wealthy, his honor Gabriel Triesti, to do true honor to the Torah in the eyes of God, may He guard him for endless generations, Amen, may it be the will of God."  Another later hand has added, "And now, may his soul be bound up in the bonds of life." Gabriel Trieste (1784-1860) was a prominent Jewish merchant and philanthropist in Padua, president of the Community there.  He established several benevolent foundations, including one of 24,000 Austrian lire for promoting art among young Jewish artists, and another prize of 1,000 gulden, given in 1850 for the publication of a history of the Jews.  See also the Italian gold amulet, lot 205, with the arms of the Trieste family.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-04-29
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The dysart epergne a magnificent george ii silver epergne, paul crespin

The oval stand on double scroll shell supports engraved with the Dysart armorials centred by ribbon tied floral garlands and with eight leaf wrapped scroll branches, the detachable central basket, slide on oval dishes and screw-on circular dishes on branches all engraved with Dysart armorials below an earl's coronet, finely pierced and engraved with flowers, scrolls and shells below gadroon border, all the dishes on scroll supports for use on the table, the four circular dishes interchangeable with candle sconces, eight acorn finials for branch sockets when vacant, all the components and sockets numbered one to four, fully marked and part marked, the drip pans unmarked Lionel Tollemache was born at Helmingham Hall in 1708 and became the 4th Earl of Dysart upon the death of his grandfather in 1727. It was also at this time that the young Earl embarked upon an extensive Grand Tour, visiting France, Switzerland and Italy. In 1729, aged 32, he married Grace Carteret, aged 16, daughter of Lord Cateret, later 1st Earl of Granville. Grace Cateret was a talented amateur artist who painted pastel portraits of the family and applied shell work decoration to furniture. Grace was well known for her colourful dress and also for her strong character, upon which her cousin Mrs Delaney commented, ‘..her gaiety was all external, for a heart she is the most wretched virtuous woman that I know’1. By the time the 4th Earl inherited Ham House it was in a poor state. A detailed structural survey by the 4th Earl’s architect John James concluded that the exterior of Ham required urgent attention, particularly the bay windows and door frontispiece which was ‘gone so far as to endanger even pulling the Roof after it’. The 4th Earl’s account books detail extensive repairs throughout the 1740s and 1750s, during which time the bays were rebuilt, frontispiece removed and sash windows replaced. The 4th Earl also devoted much attention to improving and refurbishing the interior of Ham. The Marble Dining Room was redecorated and a new family drawing room created. The latest furnishings, silver and upholstery were purchased for Ham, as detailed in the surviving account books still retained by the family. The 4th Earl was also clearly a passionate collector, he purchased paintings at auction and was a great bibliophile. The Earl formed one of the finest libraries in Europe, acquiring important works from the Harleian Library, including no less than six books by the earliest English printer, William Caxton (c1422-91). Much of this magnificent library was dispersed in the Buckminster Library sale at Sotheby's, London, 30th May 1938. Horace Walpole referred to the Earl, who was created a Knight of the Thistle in 1743, as 'a strange brute' and 'an indigent usurer'. He died in 1770 at the age of 73 and was buried at Helmingham with great ceremony. At this time a surtout (or epergne) was one of the most important and extravagant pieces of dining plate, ranking, for example, alongside wine coolers. Lord Chesterfield when appointed Ambassador to the Hague included amongst his issue an ‘Aparn with all its appertinencys’ at 820oz together with wine coolers at 388oz. Unfortunately the epergne is now lost, but probably bore similarities to that illustrated in his cook's book, Vincent La Chapelle, The Modern Cook, published in 1736. La Chapelle featured an epergne in his table plans and noted the 'surtout to be left upon the Table till the Dessert is ser'd''. Lady Grisell Baille described how an epergne was used at a dinner for the Duke of Chandos at Cannons, 12th April 1725. For the second course she notes that the three epergne (or rings) had ‘five plates, 4 low and one higher in the middle in each, 1st ring a green goose, a chicken a Rabet. The midle ring blang Mangie, broun Mangie, brunt cream, custart white and custart green or Tanzie. 3rd ring a dukline, turkie port, 2 pigions broiled chicken, rabet’. Thus, whilst the two side epergnes held poultry for the second course, the central tureen contained desserts for later in the meal2. The Dysart epergne is highly sophisticated and would have been greatly admired by those around the table. This epergne belongs to the second phase of development of the surtout, succeeded those examples such as the Kirkleatham epergne at Temple Newsam, Leeds by David Willaume and Anne Tanqueary, 1731, and the Williams surtout, Edward Feline, 1730, sold Sotheby's, New York, 19th October 1995, lot 454, and now in the National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, which have a central soup tureen, cruets and casters attached3. By the mid-18th Century, this had been replaced by a central basket and various sized dishes and candle branches which could be interchanged  according to various courses and desired ambience throughout the dinner (see figures 2, 3 and 5). These versatile centrepieces would have provided a homogeneous decorative dining scheme as the dishes could be seperated and formally placed upon the table. Epergnes of comparable sophistication include: the Hope epergne for John Hope, 2nd Earl of Hopetoun, Eliza Godfrey, 1753 and another by James Schruder, 1742. The Dysart epergne is without doubt one of the finest and best known preserved from this group4. The 4th Earl appears to have patronised the leading Huguenot goldsmiths of the period, in a similar manner to the 2nd Earl of Warrington. However, unlike Warrington’s silver, many of Dysart's pieces reflected the latest contemporary, albeit slightly restrained, rococo taste. The 4th Earl was well educated through his Grand Tour and shown himself to be at the forefront of fashion when he purchased the pair of figural candelabra by pre-eminent Royal Parisan goldsmith, Thomas Germain, Paris, 1732-4 now in the Firestone Collection, Detroit Insitute of Arts5. He had anticipated the importance of this rococo design ahead of his English contemporaries - the model was subsequently adopted with slight variations by Charles Kandler, 1738, by John Hugh le Sage in 1744 for George II and George Wickes for the Earl of Kildare in the same year6. The Germain candelabra were sold in the same sale as this epergne, at J Trevor and Sons, London, 12th May 1955, lot 81. Much of the 4th Earl’s English silver was sold at Christie’s, London, 13 May 1953 and included pieces by the master goldsmiths such as James Schruder, David Willaume, Augustine Courtauld and Anne Tanqueary, as well as others by Paul Crespin. Philippa Glanville has studied the 4th Earl's bills for plate and found that he appears to have acquired splendid household and dining silver through regular orders begun in the late 1720s and into the 1740s7. Glanville identifies an early order for a shaving jug and soap box in 1729, presumably those by Anne Tanqueary, 1729, bearing the arms of the 4th Earl, sold in the Christie's 1953 sale and recently sold at Sotheby’s, New York, 24 October 2000, lots 412 and 413 (see figure 6). Also corresponding with the bills is a 'brade basket' from David Willaume which cost £1014s 9d. This had the arms of the 4th Earl and his wife, David Willaume, 1733 and was sold Sotheby’s, London, 20 November 2003, lot 204 (see figure 7). By the late 1730s Paul Crespin appears to have been the principal supplier of plate to the 4th Earl. Glanville notes in the early 1740s orders for serving dishes which include four of 1743 sold from the Poke Collection, Sotheby's, 20th November 2003 lot 171 and subsequently a pair of 1750, lot 172. Also ordered were three naturalistic scallop shell dishes from Paul Crespin, 1740/1, similar to examples produced by Paul de Lamerie, and which are now in a private collection. With respect to this gradual accumulation of dining plate, Glanville remarks that 'the centrepiece, the largest (259 ounces) and most expensive individual item, came from Crespin only in 1748'. A superb chocolate pot, 1738, was also produced by Crespin for the 4th Earl, and this survives complete with its molinet in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford8. This was intended for the comparatively private occasion of breakfast and thus was produced in finely proportioned plain bottle form and engraved with the arms of the 4th Earl and his wife, Lady Cateret. The family papers record that Crespin supplied this pot on 17th June 1738 at a cost of £14 4s 1d9. Paul Crespin (1694-1759) was one of the foremost Huguenot goldsmiths of the first half of the 18th Century (see figure 1 and 4). He was the son of Daniel Crespin of St Giles in the Fields and apprenticed to the Huguenot Jean Pons in 171310. Crespin registered his first mark by December 1721, when he was described as free of the Longbowstring Makers' Company.  He was closely linked with Paul de Lamerie and his circle of goldsmiths and clients. This is most clearly demonstrated by the magnificent pair of wine coolers issued by the Jewel House for Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (1694-1773) and  Ambassador to the Hague,  sold Sotheby's, London, 4th February 1988 and now divided between the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Gallery of Scotland, which bear Paul Crespin's mark overstriking that of Paul de Lamerie11. Crespin produced works for the Dukes of Portland, Somerset and Devonshire, and the Earls of Rockingham and Albemarle. He also supplied plate for important foreign commissions, including a bathing vessel weighing 6030oz for the King of Portugal and various plate, produced alongside other Huguenot goldsmiths, for Empress Catherine in 1726. A rare surviving portrait of Paul Crespin by Pierre Subleyras, circa 1726, is in the Victoria & Albert Museum. In the painting Crespin, with his shirt sleeves rolled up, holds a baroque vase after the designs of Enea Vico, showing his admiration  for a bold style from which many rococo silversmiths sought inspiration.

  • GBRStorbritannien
  • 2004-05-27
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Silver & Guld

Under denna kategori hittar ni föremål i rent guld och silver ute till auktion. Exempelvis matbestick, bägare, vaser, ljusstakar och kaffeserviser i silver och dosor av guld som är till salu på auktion.